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MT101 Calculus I (3-0-3): Functions, Limit and Continuity, Differential Calculus I, Differential Calculus II, Applications of Derivatives, Integral Calculus, Applications of Integral Calculus, Techniques of Integration, Infinite Series

Pre-requisite(s): None

MT102 Differential Equations and Linear Algebra I (3-0-3): Matrix algebra and general properties of matrices, elementary row operations, reduction of matrices into echelon and reduced echelon form, rank of a matrix, determinants and their properties, solution of system of linear algebraic equations, Gaussian elimination and Gauss-Jordan method, eigenvalues, eigenvectors and their applications, diagonalization, basic definitions involving differential equations, first order ordinary differential equations and their solution techniques, applications of first order differential equations, second and higher order differential equations, superposition principle, some special types of second order differential equations and their solution techniques, applications of second order differential equations , higher order linear differential equations with constant coefficients, complimentary and particular solutions, solutions by undetermined coefficients and variation of parameters, Cauchy-Euler equations, applications of higher order differential equations, systems of linear differential equations, series solutions of ODEs, solutions about ordinary points, Solutions about singular points, Laplace Transforms, Transforms of Derivatives, Application of Transforms in ODEs.

Pre-requisite(s): None

PH101 Applied Physics (3-0-3): Introduction to engineering mechanics problems, Vector Operations, Force Vectors, Motion in one, two and three dimensions, Newton Laws and its applications, Momentum, Rotational dynamics and kinematics, Moment of Force, Principle of Moments, Moment of a Couple, Work and Energy, Electrostatics, Electric Potential, Magnetic Field.

Pre-requisite(s): None
co-requisite (s): PH101L

PH101L Applied Physics Lab (0-3-1):  In this laboratory students perform the experiments related to the Forces (Addition and Resolution), Acceleration due to Gravity, Conservation of Energy using Projectile Launcher, Translational Equilibrium, Study of Average Velocity using Air Track System, Ballistic Pendulum, Variable “g” Pendulum, Rotational Dynamics, Introduction to Electricity &Magnetism Lab, Magnetic Moment in Magnetic Field and Measurement of EMF and Internal Resistance.

Pre-requisite(s): None
co-requisite (s): PH101

ES111 Probability and Statistics (3-0-3): Introduction to Statistics and Data Analysis. Probability Basics, Conditional Probability, Independence, and the Product Rule, Bayes’ Rule. Random Variables and Probability Distributions. Mathematical Expectation: Mean, Variance, Covariance. Chebyshev’s Theorem. Discrete Probability Distributions. Continuous Probability Distributions. Single Sample Sampling Distributions. Single Sample Tests of Hypotheses. Linear Regression and Correlation. Least Squares and the Fitted Model.  Tools: Excel, R, Stata or similar tools.

Pre-Requisite: MT101

MT202 Calculus II (3-0-3): Parametric representation of plane curves; Calculus with parametric curves; Polar coordinates; Graphing polar equations; Conic sections in polar coordinates; Areas and arc lengths in polar coordinates. Vectors in three dimensions. Dot and cross product. Lines and planes. Surfaces. Limits, continuity, Partial derivatives. Increments and differentials, Chain rules. Directional derivatives, gradient. Tangent planes and normal lines to surfaces. Taylor series for functions of several variables. Extrema of functions of several variables. Relative extrema, Lagrange multipliers. Double integrals, Definition, and evaluation. Area and volume. Double integrals in polar coordinates. Surface area. Triple integrals in Cartesian, Cylindrical, and spherical coordinates. Applications to engineering and science.

Pre-requisite(s): MT101

MT203 Complex Variables and Transforms (3 0 3): Introduction to Complex Number System,  Argand diagram, De Moivre’s theorem and its Application Problem Solving Techniques, Complex and Analytical Functions, Harmonic Function, Cauchy-Riemann Equations, Cauchy’s theorem and Cauchy’s Line Integral, Power series, Taylor series, Laurent series, Residual integration, Singularities, Poles, Residues, Contour Integration, Laplace transform definition, Laplace transforms of elementary functions, Properties of Laplace transform, Periodic functions and their Laplace transforms, Inverse Laplace transform and its properties, Convolution theorem, Inverse Laplace transform by integral and partial fraction methods, Heaviside expansion formula, Solutions of ordinary differential equations by Laplace transform, Applications of Laplace transforms, Fourier theorem and coefficients in Fourier series, Even and odd functions, Complex form of Fourier series, Fourier transform definition, Fourier transforms of simple functions, Magnitude and phase spectra, Fourier transform theorems, Inverse Fourier transform, Series solution of differential equations, Validity of series solution, Ordinary point, Singular point, Forbenius method, Indicial equation, Bessel’s differential equation, its solution of first kind and recurrence formulae, Legendre differential equation and its solution, Rodrigues formula.

Pre-requisite(s): MT102

ES211/EE211 Circuit Analysis I (3-0-3): Basic Concepts, resistive circuits, nodal and loop analysis techniques, operational amplifiers, additional analysis techniques such as using superposition, Thevenin’s and Norton’s Theorems, capacitance, and inductance, first- and second-order transient circuits, phasors, AC steady state analysis.

Pre-requisite(s): MT102

ES211L Circuit Analysis Lab (0-3-1): This lab enables the students to analyze DC and AC circuits, variable frequency network performance and sensor network circuits. Students get a hands-on experience of soldering and PCB designing, and demonstrate their ability to design circuits for practical applications.

ES212/EE221 Logic Design (3-0-3): Number systems, codes, set theory, relations, functions, Boolean Algebra, Logic gates, combinational logic, programmable logic devices, sequential logic, latches, flip-flops, finite state machines, counters, shift registers, pseudorandom sequence generators, memories, adders, subtractors, multiplication, division, comparators, fault detection, introduction to programmable logic devices and implementation of the digital circuit using Verilog/HDL.

Pre-requisite(s): None

ES212L Logic Design Lab (0-3-1): This lab introduces logic design and basic building blocks used in digital systems. A study of basic and complex digital logic circuit design, and their implementation is done. Circuit schematic development simulation of digital systems is also performed. Experiments explore designs with combinational and sequential logic. Students work through design activities, which include testing, implementing, troubleshooting, and a final lab project.

ES213 Computer Architecture (3–0–3): Review of Verilog HDL, registers and register transfers, memory basics, computer design basics, instruction set architecture, central processing units, input—output and communication and memory systems.

Pre-requisite(s): CS101, ES212

ES213L Computer Architecture Lab (0-3-1): This lab will give students the ability to simulate combinational and sequential logic using Verilog HDL as well as to design logic and digital computer systems having RISC Based Architecture.

ES214 Circuit Analysis II (3–0–3): AC steady state power analysis, variable-frequency network performance, the Laplace transform and its application to circuit analysis, Fourier analysis techniques and two-port networks.

Pre-requisite(s): ES211/EE211

ES221/CS211 Data Structures and Algorithms (3-0-3): Introduction to data structures and algorithms, arrays, stacks, binary search, queues, linked lists, trees, graphs and operations, algorithm performance, dynamic memory management.

Prerequisite(s): CS112/CS102L

ES231/EE231 Electronics I (3-0-3):  Introduction to electronics, semiconductor diode, diode applications, bipolar junction transistor, transistor configuration, DC biasing, field effect transistor, BJT and FET small signals equivalent circuit models, design of BJT and FET amplifiers and differential amplifiers.

Pre-requisite(s): ES211/EE211

ES231L Electronics I Lab (0-3-1): This lab will demonstrate will help students to analyze and demonstrate the diode-based circuits in various configurations, the operational principle of circuits for bipolar junction transistor (BJT) and field effect transistor (FET).

ES232 Thermodynamics (3-0-3): Fundamentals of thermodynamics including work and heat, laws of thermodynamics, properties of purse substances, energy analysis of closed systems, mass and energy analysis of control volumes, entropy, enthalpy, reversibility, irreversibility, study of some processes and cycles.

Pre-requisite(s): MT101

ES304 Linear Algebra II (3-0-3): Matrices algebra, determinants, linear systems and solutions, vectors in 2 space and 3 space, vector algebra and related theorems, vector spaces, subspaces and related theorems, linear combinations and related theorems, linear dependent and independent vectors, basis and related theorems, rank and nullity, Gram-Schmidt Process, inner product spaces, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, diagonalization of matrices and related theorems, linear transformation, kernel and range of linear transformation, applications to engineering and science.

Pre-requisite(s): MT102

ES314/EE221/CE324 Microprocessor Systems and Interfacing (3–0–3): Introduction to microprocessors; general purpose and embedded features, architecture and assembly language programming of typical micro controllers (such as 8051, PIC, AVR, Raspberry Pi), different types of instructions, addressing modes, time delay, crystal oscillator, I/O port and timer/counter programming, serial port programming, interrupts programming, interfacing to external memory, real world interfacing, LCD, ADC, sensors, and keyboard interfacing, interfacing with 8255 and RTC interfacing, motor control. Introduction to Arduino and Raspberry Pi development boards, their interfacing and programming.

Pre-requisite(s): ES213

ES314L Microprocessor Systems and Interfacing Lab (0-3-1): This lab is meant for the students to learn about typical microprocessor and microcontroller-based systems. It is used in two courses, computer architecture and microprocessor/microcontroller Interfacing. The laboratory is equipped with oscilloscopes, digital trainers, Burners (Programmers), digital multimeters and support electrical and electronics accessories.

ES332/EE351 Signals and Systems (3-0-3): Introduction to continuous and discrete time systems, analysis of continuous time (CT) system using Fourier and Laplace Transforms, ideal and practical CT filters, sampling analysis of discrete time (DT) systems, difference equations and unit sample response, z-transform, DT Fourier transform and linear feedback systems.

Pre-requisite(s): ES211/EE211

ES332L Signals and Systems Lab (0-3-1): This lab is performed in computer simulation lab. All computers are installed with MATLAB software and connected with centralized printer. Student performed signals and systems analysis in frequency and time domain using Signals and Systems toolbox.

ES334 Foundation of Photonics (3-0-3): Introduction to photonics engineering, Optical waveguides and fibers, Fiber optic telecommunication, Nature and properties of light, Light sources and laser safety, Interference, Diffraction, Polarization, Basic geometrical optics, Basic physical optics, Optical instruments, Lasers and applications, Optical modulation and detection, Integrated optics, Nonlinear optics, Organic/inorganic and hybrid photovoltaics,  Holography.

Pre-requisite(s): PH101
ES334L Foundation of Photonics Lab (0-3-1): Laboratory experiments introducing geometrical and physical optics, characterization of LEDs & Laser diodes,  fiber transmission, laser beams,  interferometers,  optical systems (cameras, scanners, sensors), polarization devices, emission & photoabsorption spectroscopy, photo luminance, demonstration and use of high power laser, demonstration and use of Keithley 4200-SCS Semiconductor Characterization System for study of electronic and photonic devices, modeling and simulation of photonic devices.

ES341/CSE342 Numerical Analysis (3-0-3): Error and computer arithmetic, Root-finding for non-linear equations, interpolation and polynomial approximation, solution of system of linear equations, numerical differentiation and integration and numerical solution of ordinary differential equations.

Pre-requisite(s): MT102

ES341L Numerical Analysis Lab (0-3-1): The goal of this lab is to get familiar with discrete Simulation techniques and their uses in various science and engineering applications. It also aims to provide basic knowledge of designing simulation models, simulation algorithms and their implementation on PCs.

ES361/EE333 Solid State Electronics (3-0-3): Introduction to semiconductor materials, band theory of solids, carrier transport in semiconductor, Schrodinger’s equation and wavefunctions, Fermi-Dirac probability, Kronig-Penny model, E-k diagram, pn-junction and metal-junction devices, metal-oxide semiconductor devices,  and bipolar junction transistor.

Pre-requisite(s): PH101

ES361L Solid State Electronics Lab (0-3-1): Students are trained to measure material characteristics such as resistivity measurement, conductivity type and carrier concentration using state-of-the-art modeling software. Experiments on Solar Cell I-V characterization and thermoelectric generator are also conducted in this lab. Major equipment includes Hall Effect board (P/nGe), Hal Effect board (Zn/Cu), Universal Measuring Amplifier and support accessories.

ES371 Engineering Electromagnetics (3-0-3): Vector analysis, static electric and magnetic fields, Maxwell’s equations, electric and magnetic boundary value problems, Poisson’s and Laplace’s equation, displacement current.

Pre-requisite(s): PH101, MT102

ES325 Advanced Statistics (3-0-3): Statistical methods are used for the analysis of different datasets for forecasting the values, predicting the unknowns, relating the variables for getting deeper insights, and relating data differences with real-world complexities. Data Science extracts knowledge from data on the basis of hidden patterns which can be made explicit by incorporating the statistical algorithms in it. This course is designed to prepare students on statistical techniques with a purview of artificial intelligence and data science.

Pre-requisite(s): ES111

ES324 Discrete System Modeling and Simulation (3-0-3): This course covers “Discrete-Event” simulation at an introductory level, preparing students for advanced studies in these fields. The main purpose of the course is to provide an introduction to the modeling and simulation of discrete-state, discrete-event systems (DES). This course will provide an investigation of the steps of a DES simulation study, including problem formulation, conceptual model design, simulation model development, input data modeling, output data analysis, verification and validation, and design of simulation experiments.

Pre-requisite(s): ES111

ES324L Discrete System Modeling and Simulation Lab (0-3-1): This lab is used to simulate and analyze different models of System Design and Engineering Management. The lab is equipped with 20 Core i7 PCs running on Windows 10 operating system. These PCs are interconnected via broadband network and students have access to internet, e-mail, and a high-speed laser printer. Different software tools such as MATLAB and Simulink are used to perform simulations of various engineering designs. Arena, SPSS, and Excel packages are used to perform discrete-event simulations and analysis of output data to solve problems of engineering management.

ES322/EE213/ME202 Instrumentation and Process Control (3-0-3): Precision measurements terminologies principles of different measurement techniques; instruments for measurement of electrical and non‐electrical quantities; systems for signal processing and signal transmission; modern instrumentation techniques; static and dynamic responses of instrumentation and signal conditioning; data acquisition systems; principles of operation, construction and working of different analog and digital meters, Advanced Testing & Measuring instruments recording instruments, signal generators, Input and output transducers; types of bridges for measurement of resistance, inductance, and capacitance; power and energy meters; voltage / current measurements. Programmable Logic Controllers (PLC), SCADA and communication are introduced. After learning the principles of developing PLC programs, examples of control systems are presented.

Pre-requisite(s): ES211

ES322L Instrumentation and process control Lab (0-3-1): In this lab students are trained how to interface the physical world with the computer by using the LabView software. The students are given tasks of sensors interfacing including thermal, mechanical, and optical sensors. They also learn how to develop the graphical user interface. At the end of the semester students are also given the open-ended problem of any electro-mechanical system.

ES426 VLSI Design (3-0-3): Transistor topology, transistor equations, CMOS process steps, design rules, for custom layout; CMOS logic design, complex gates, BiCMOS circuits, pseudo, NMOS, dynamic logic, dynamic cascaded logic, domino logic, 2 and 4 phase logic, pass transistor logic; control and timing, synchronous and asynchronous, self-timed system, multiphase clocks, examples of ALU, shifters and registers; layout, hand layout, graphical layout, low-level languages, design rule checking, placement of cells, simulation of design, test pattern generation, high-level languages, structured design methodology for FLSI, hierarchical design techniques and examples. ultra-fast VLSI circuits and systems, and their design; digital and analog architectures, serial addition, bitserial multipliers, systolic arrays, future integrated circuit processing, effect of scaling circuit dimensions, physical limits of device fabrication. Clocking and Timing Issues. Layout of digital circuits. HDL Programming in Verilog.

Pre-requisite(s): ES361

ES441 Engineering Optimization (3-0-3): Brief review of LP models and simplex algorithm, general transportation model, network models and their tabular representation, transportation and transshipment models, transportation algorithms, assignment models and their various ramifications, Hungarian algorithm, integer linear programming and related models, zero-one programming, standard examples, modeling of various situations occurring in real world, network models, basic terminology of graph theory, spanning tree, minimum path, and maximum flow problems, network optimization algorithms, project management, PERT and CPM, queuing models, distribution of inter-arrival and service times and simple M/M/k systems.

Pre-requisite(s): MT202

ES441L Engineering Optimization Lab (0-3-1): The goal of this lab is to train students to solve real-world optimization problems. In the planning or operation of an engineering system, engineers have to make technological and managerial decisions at several stages. The ultimate objective of all such decisions is to make optimal actions that result in a minimum effort required or to maximize the desired outcomes. This lab will introduce optimization tools, which will help students model an engineering design problem as an optimization problem, and then solve them with appropriate optimization methods.

ES442 Machine Learning (3-0-3): Introduction to machine learning; concept learning: General-to-specific ordering of hypotheses, Version spaces Algorithm, Candidate elimination algorithm; Supervised Learning: decision trees, Naive Bayes, Artificial Neural Networks, Support Vector Machines, Overfitting, noisy data, and pruning, Measuring Classifier Accuracy; Linear and Logistic regression; Unsupervised Learning: Hierarchical Agglomerative Clustering. k-means partitional clustering; Self-Organizing Maps (SOM) k-Nearest-neighbor algorithm; Semisupervised learning with EM using labeled and unlabeled data; Reinforcement Learning: Hidden Markov models, Monte Carlo inference Exploration vs. Exploitation Trade-off, Markov Decision Processes; Ensemble Learning: Using committees of multiple hypotheses. Bagging, boosting

Pre-requisite(s): ES325

ES442L Machine Learning Lab (0-3-1): Artificial Neural Networks, Support Vector Machines, Overfitting, noisy data, and pruning, Measuring Classifier Accuracy; Linear and Logistic regression; Unsupervised Learning: Hierarchical Agglomerative Clustering. k-means partitional clustering; Self-Organizing Maps (SOM) k-Nearest-neighbor algorithm; Semisupervised learning with EM using labeled and unlabeled data; Reinforcement Learning: Hidden Markov models.

ES471 Model Engineering (3-0-3): . The goal of this course is to develop an understanding of the various modeling paradigms appropriate for capturing system behavior and conducting digital computer simulations of many types of systems. The techniques and concepts discussed typically include mathematical modeling of engineering systems based on Linear System of Equations, Nonlinear System of Equations. The course will also cover modeling of Complex Engineering Systems as a set of Differential-Algebraic-Equations (DEAs) models, Graphical Models, Integer Programming, and Stochastic Models.

Pre-requisite(s): MT202

ES471L Model Engineering Lab (0-3-1): The purpose of this lab is to equip students with a set of skills that will enable them to model complex engineering problems as mathematical models. Subsequently, modeling engineering systems as a set of Linear/Nonlinear equations, Differential-Algebraic Equations (DAEs), Differences equations, or stochastic models. In this lab, students will also learn different modeling toolboxes such as Simulink and Mathematica.

ES463 Electronic and Magnetic Materials (3-0-3): Molecular Collisions, Thermal Fluctuations and Noise, The Crystalline State, Defects and their significance, Drude Model, Temperature dependent Resistivity, Matthiessen’s Rule, Nordheim’s Rule, Thermal Conductivity, Electrical Conductivity of nonmetals etc. Origin of magnetic moment of atoms, theories of magnetism such as molecular theory and electron theory, hysteresis and magnetization curve, magnetic domains, domain walls, methods of observation of domains, classification of magnetic materials according to magnetic properties.

Pre-requisite(s): ES361

ES465 Semiconductor Devices and Applications (3-0-3): Semiconductor device fabrication, metal-semiconductor and metal-insulator-semiconductor junctions and devices, photonic devices, transferred- electron devices, switching devices, other semiconductor devices, amorphous semiconductors, band models of amorphous semiconductors, electronic applications, optical applications, magnetic applications, super conductive materials, and devices.

Pre-requisite(s): ES361

ES466 Microelectronics Manufacturing Engineering (3-0-3): Designing of electronic devices and integrated circuits, manufacturing process of electronic devices and integrated circuits, electronic devices processing equipment’s and their manufacturing limit, microlithography masking and pattering by UV lithography technique, electron beam lithography: design and patterning, positive and negative resist systems and resist-materials characterization, oxidation, diffusion, ion implantation, metallization and plasma etching processes.

Pre-requisite(s): None

ES425 Fiber Optic Communication: This course is related to the principles of optical fiber communication systems. The course covers three topics: 1) The optical fiber as a transmission channel. 2) Optoelectronic devices used in transmitters, receivers, and multiplexers. 3) Design of the overall communication system and assessment of its performance. In part 1, step-index and graded-index multimode and single-mode optical fibers are described and their attenuation and dispersion characteristics are determined. The transfer function of the fiber system is determined. Part 2 introduces the basic principles of interaction of light with semiconductor materials, including absorption and electroluminescence. Light emitting diodes, laser diodes, and photodiodes are introduced as the basic components of optical transmitters and receivers. Semiconductor and fiber optical amplifiers are also introduced. Part 3 deals with the design of the digital fiber communication system, including derivation of the bit error rates for attenuation- and dispersion-limited systems and determination of the maximum data rates possible for a given length. Introductions to wavelength-division multiplexing (WDM) and optical fiber networks are also provided.

Pre-requisite(s): ES323

ES425L Fiber Optic Communication Lab (0-3-1): In this lab students are trained fiber optics patch cards, optical modulators, WDM and directional couplers. They also learn how to develop the graphical user interface based simulations for optical systems. The facilities include Newport fiber optics kits, fiber optics patch cards, optical modulators, WDM and directional couplers.

ES443 Laser Engineering (3-0-3): It is an introductory course on lasers which covers principles of laser amplification and oscillations, design of lasers, and general characteristics of excitation systems. It is suitable for students with backgrounds in physics, electrical engineering, materials and other disciplines who require a fundamental knowledge of lasers and how they operate. The course covers the basic physics of laser operation, and includes understandings of resonator theory, pulsed and continuous wave operation of lasers. Most popular lasers are described, as well as a pulsed techniques such as Q-switching, mode-locking and harmonic generation. The student is also introduced to the exciting types of new lasers being developed.

Pre-requisite(s): ES334

ES444 Geometric Optics (3-0-3): Geometric optics is the study of light in its simplest form by treating light as rays. Light rays travel in straight lines until they encounter an interface (such as a mirror or a lens) where they may be redirected by reflection and refraction. This course describes the physical principles that determine how rays behave at various interfaces. These principles are then used to model simple optical systems with varying degrees of fidelity. Natural optical phenomena (rainbows, mirages, total-internal reflection, etc.) and classic optical systems (prisms, telescopes, cameras, etc.) will be analyzed throughout the course. Linear systems will be introduced to analyze more complex optical systems. This course provides the fundamentals needed for optical system design.

Pre-requisite(s): ES334

ES445 Biophotonics (3-0-3): This course is an introduction to photobiology (interaction of light with biological matter), tissue optics, light-induced cellular processes, optical biosensors, and cellular and molecular imaging. Biophotonics is an emerging multidisciplinary field where light-based methods are utilized to reveal biological mechanisms and diagnose or treat several diseases. This course introduces the basics of biology and photonics and provides the most relevant and important application examples selected from chemistry, biology, pharmacology and medicine. For examples, it includes how to detect and identify new viruses and how to manipulate the brain of mouse with light, etc.

Pre-requisite(s): ES334

ES461 Imaging & Displays (3-0-3): This course introduces the basic principles of two- and three-dimensional imaging systems. It begins with the mathematical description of image formation as a linear system and draws on the student’s knowledge of signals and systems to introduce the concepts of point spread function, transfer function, resolution, and restoration. Actual physical imaging systems (such as microscopes, telescopes, and copiers) operating in the gazing and scanning configurations are subsequently modeled and their resolution assessed. Interferometric imaging systems and their applications in metrology are described. Techniques for depth profiling are then introduced including point-by-point scanning (as in laser scanning fluorescence microscopy), echo ranging (as in sonar and radar imaging), and interferometry (as in optical coherence tomography). This is followed by an introduction to computational imaging, including the techniques of computed tomography (CT), range tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Hyperspectral imaging systems and their various configurations are then described including applications in detection (of tumors, for example) and classification (of different targets). Performance measures such as sensitivity and specificity are introduced. Applications for remote sensing, nondestructive testing, and biology and medicine are highlighted.

Pre-requisite(s): ES334

ES462/MM391 Nanomaterials and Nanotechnology (3-0-3): Introduction to Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Physical chemistry of solid surfaces, surface energy, electrostatic stabilization, steric stabilization , zero-dimensional nanostructures: nanoparticles, quantum dots, one dimensional nanostructures: nanowires and nanorods, template–based synthesis, two dimensional nanostructures. Thin films by physical and chemical methods, three-dimensional nanostructures: nano-carbons, fullerenes, CNTs and graphene, core shell nanostructures, nanomaterials hazards and safety procedures.

Pre-requisite(s): ES361

ES474 Optoelectronics (3-0-3): This module introduces the main components of modern day optoelectronic systems. This will include active devices for the generation, detection, amplification and modulation of optical signals and the key passive components in modern optical communication systems. The working principle for different types of optoelectronic devices such as optical modulators, LCDs, etc are studied in detail. The optoelectronic characteristics of transmitters (LED, Lasers, Laser diodes, optical amplifiers) and receivers (pin photodiode, avalanche PD, heterojunction PD, solar cell) are analyzed.  This module also covers modeling and analysis of optoelectronic devices via a series of lab sessions.

Pre-requisite(s): ES361

ES474L Optoelectronics Lab (0-3-1): Laboratory experiments introduce principles of optical waveguiding, optical network analysis, characterization of lasers, optical modulators, and WDM components. Laboratory facilities include Michelson interferometer kits, advanced optics kits, spectrometers, DSP lock-in-amplifiers, He-Ne lasers, high power Nd:YAG laser, diode lasers, laser power meters, PIN diodes, APDs, phototransistors, computers with DAQ cards, Oscilloscopes, analog and digital trainers, photonic device fabrication & characterization, software tools for the modeling & simulation photonic devices and systems, and a wide range of other photonic components and kits.

ES467 Analysis for Modeling and Simulation (3-0-3): An introduction to analysis techniques appropriate to the conduct of modeling and simulation studies. Topics include input modeling, random number generation, output analysis, variance reduction techniques, and experimental design. In addition, techniques for verification & validation are introduced. Course concepts are applied to real systems and data.

Pre-requisite(s): ES111

ES446 Heat Transfer and Modeling (3-0-3): Introduction and basic concepts of heat and mass transfer mechanisms and their physics, Modeling and simulation of heat and mass transfer mechanisms using the modern tools, Analysis of heat and mass transfer mechanisms using mathematical models and equations, Impacts and applications of heat and mass transfer mechanisms on humans and environment and Recent trends and innovations in the heat and mass transfer mechanisms.

Pre-requisite(s): MT102

ES447 Financial Engineering Models (3-0-3): Corporate finance and financial evaluation, financial statements modeling, building a pro forma model, portfolio models, calculating efficient portfolios, efficient portfolios without short sales, portfolio optimization, the binomial option pricing model, the Black-Scholes model, immunizing strategies, modeling the term structure, Monte Carlo methods, simulating stock prices, Monte Carlo simulations for investments, simulating options and option strategies and Monte Carlo methods for option pricing.

Pre-requisite(s): ES441

ES481 and ES482 Senior Design Project Part – I and II (0-18-6):  The aim of this course is to sharpen the skills of the engineering science students by participating in projects that are to be identified in collaboration with the industry. Every project will be assigned a faculty advisor. The students may work independently or jointly (in small groups) on the projects. The duration of the project team is one full year. The progress will be monitored through interim presentations and reports. A final report will be due at the end of the term.

Course Details and Related Material

PH101 Applied Physics

 
 

PH 101 – Applied Physics

Pre-Requisite:  None

Instructor:

 

Course Introduction

This course covers the fundamentals of engineering applying the concepts of basic mathematics and physics but at advanced level. The aim of this subject is to develop an understanding of real-world engineering applications and problem solving.

Course Content

·        Introduction to engineering mechanics problems

·        Vector Operations, Force Vectors

·        Motion in one, two and three dimensions

·        Newton Laws and its applications

·        Momentum

·        Rotational dynamics and kinematics

·        Moment of Force, Principle of Moments, Moment of a Couple

·        Work and Energy

·        Electrostatics

·        Magnetic Field

Mapping of Class Learning Outcome (CLOs) to Program Learning Outcomes (PLOs)

S. No

CLOs

PLOs

BT Level

 

After completing this course, the student will be able to…

 

CLO1

Apply Newton’s Laws to problems of translational motion and rotational motion

PLO1

C3

CLO2

Apply fundamental conservation laws(momentum, angular momentum, work done and energy) to the problems of mechanics

PLO1

C3

CLO3

To apply the fundamental equations and concepts of electricity and magnetism to solve related problems.

PLO1

C3

 

 

 

 

Grading Policy (Subject to change upon the discretion of the instructors)

Assessment Items

% Marks

1.

Assignment

5%

2.

Quizzes

20%

3.

Mid-Term Exam

25% (After 8th week)

5.

Final Exams

50% (After 15th week)

Text and Reference Books

Textbooks:

1.      R.Resnick, D.Halliday & K.S. Krane, “Physics Volume-1”, 5th Edition, 2002

2.      R.Resnick, D.Halliday & K.S. Krane, “Physics Volume-2”, 5th Edition, 2002

3.      R.C. Hibbeler; Engineering mechanics, Statics, 14th Edition, Pearson Education

Reference books:

1.      Hugh D. Young & Roger A. Freedman, “University Physics”, 12th Edition, 2012

2.      Frederick J.Keller,W.Edward Gettys & Malcolm J.Skove, “Physics: Classical and Modern”

3.      Raymond A. Serway and John W.Jewett, “Physics for Scientists and Engineers”, 6th Edition

4.      Feynmann Lectures on Physics

Administrative Instruction

·        Student Attendance is expected to be 100%, and minimum 80% (mandatory) attendance that is required to sit in the final exams

·        Student must pay the attention for reading the textbooks chapter for course assessment

·        All the direct assessment tools i.e., Quizzes, Assignment, Midterms, Project and final Exams must be attempted.  Failure to attempt in any of the assessment tools without any medical reasons may results to fail in that particular assessment.  All quizzes would be taken together for all sections.

·        Students are advised to study the previous lecture before next class for better understanding.

·        Class participation is highly encouraged. It develops more interest. Students are also advised to spare some time for group discussion with their classmates to explore new ideas.

·        Handouts and related notes will available on FES internet course portal.

·        For any query please contact instructor during office time.

Lecture Breakdown

Lecture#1

Introduction to classical Mechanics and its applications

Lecture#2

Vectors and its properties, Scalars and vectors, Vector operations, vector addition of forces

Lecture#3

Addition of a system of coplanar forces

Lecture#4

Cartesian vectors, position vectors

Lecture#5

Force vector directed along a line, dot product.

Lecture#6

Position, velocity and acceleration, Straight line motion

Lecture#7

Motion with constant acceleration, Freely falling bodies

Lecture#8

Newton’s Laws and its applications

Lecture#9

Newton’s Laws and Motion in 3 dimensions with constant acceleration

Lecture#10

Continued with problems

Lecture#11

Tension and Normal Forces

Lecture#12

Frictional Forces

Lecture#13

Linear Momentum

Lecture#14

Conservation of momentum

Lecture#15

Continued with problems

Lecture#16

Rotational Motion (Kinematics),

Lecture#17

Rotation with constant angular acceleration

Lecture#18

Continued with problems

Lecture#19

Rotational Motion (Dynamics)

Lecture#20

Continued with problems

Lecture#21

Rotational Inertia and Newton’s second Law

Lecture#22

Center of Mass

Lecture#23

Moment of a force (scalar formulation)

Lecture#24

Cross product, moment of a force (vector formulation),

Lecture#25

Principle of moments,

Lecture#26

Moments of a force about a specified axis

Lecture#27

Continued with problems

Lecture#28

Work done by a constant force

Lecture#29

Work done by a variable force and power

Lecture#30

Kinetic energy and work – Energy Theorem

Lecture#31

Potential Energy

Lecture#32

Conservation of Energy

Lecture#33

Electric charge. Conductors and insulators. Coulomb’s law.

Lecture#34

Continuous charge distributions. Conservation of charge.

Lecture#35

The electric field: conception of the electric field. The electric field of point charges.

Lecture#36

Electric field of continuous charge.

Lecture#37

Electric field lines.  A charge in an electric field.

Lecture#38

A dipole in an electric field.

Lecture#39

Gauss’ law: the flux of a vector field.

Lecture#40

The flux of the electric field. Gauss’ law. Applications of Gauss’ law.

Lecture#41

Gauss’ law and conductors.

Lecture#42

The Hall effect.

Lecture#43

Faradays law of induction, Lenz law

Lecture#44

Motional EMF

Lecture#45

Ampere’s law

       

 

MT101 Calculus I

 

MT-101Calculus I

Pre-Requisite(s): None                                                                                                                                                                     

Instructors: Dr Minhaj Zaheer
Email: minhaj.zaheer@giki.edu.pk

Office : G-11, FES

 

Office hours:  (2:30pm- 5pm) Working day

Or  Take appointment by email

 

Course Introduction

This is an introductory course of ‘Calculus’ required for all engineering students. The pre-requisite is the mathematics taught at intermediate / A level to students in Pakistan. There will be quick review of the Calculus studied by the students in their intermediate (F.Sc. / A level) classes but at a much-advanced level, with introduction of many new topics and material. The emphasis will be on the application of ‘Differential and Integral Calculus’ to problems of physical sciences and engineering. At the end of the course, the students should be able to tackle the problems in other disciplines that require calculus tools for their solution.

Course Contents

•        Functions: Real numbers; Functions and their graphs; Basic elementary functions; Combining functions; Elementary functions; Domain and range of functions; Shifting and scaling of graphs.

 

•        Limit and Continuity: Limit of a function; Calculation of limits and limit laws; Limits involving infinity; One-sided limits; Continuous and discontinuous functions; Types of discontinuity; Asymptotes of graphs.

•        Differential Calculus I: Rate of change and tangents to curves; Derivative at a point; Geometric interpretation; Differentiation rules; Derivative as rate of change; Derivatives of basic elementary functions; The chain rule; Implicit differentiation; Related rates; Linearization and differentials.

 

•        Differential Calculus II: Derivatives of transcendental functions; Inverse functions and their derivatives; Exponential and logarithmic functions; Trigonometric and inverse trigonometric functions; Hyperbolic functions; Logarithmic differentiation; Intermediate forms and L’Hopital’s rule.

•        Applications of Derivatives: Mean value theorem; Monotonic functions and the first derivative test; Extreme values of functions; Concavity and the second derivative test; Applied optimization.

•        Integral Calculus: Anti-derivatives and indefinite integrals; Elementary integration techniques; Sigma notation and limits of finite sums; The definite integral; The fundamental theorem of calculus; Elementary properties and calculation of definite integrals.

•        Applications of Integral Calculus: Area under a curve and between curves; Volumes using cross-sections; Volumes using cylindrical shells; Arc length; Areas of surfaces of revolution; Calculation of work; Center of gravity of plane laminas.

•        Techniques of Integration: Use of basic integration formulas; integration by substitution and by parts; Trigonometric integrals; Trigonometric substitutions; Integration of rational functions by partial fractions; Numerical integration; Improper integrals.

•        Infinite Series: Definitions, convergence, properties. Integral test, basic and limit comparison tests, ratio and root tests. Alternating series and absolute convergence. Power series. McLaurin and Taylor series. Applications of power series.

 

 

 

 

Mapping of Class Learning Outcome (CLOs) to Program Learning Outcomes (PLOs)

S. No

CLOs

PLOs

Bloom Taxonomy

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

CLO-1

Solve problems related to limit and continuity of a function and their inter-relationship.

PLO-1

C3 (Applying)

CLO-2

Calculate the derivative and differential of a function and apply them in different applied problems.

PLO-1

C3 (Applying)

CLO-3

Use different techniques of integration to solve different applied problems.

PLO-1

C3 (Applying)

CLO-4

Apply different tests to discuss the convergence of sequences and series.

PLO-1

C3 (Applying)

Direct Assessment tools based on CLOs

Assessment Tools

CLO-1

CLO-2

CLO-3

CLO-4

Quizzes

30%

25%

20%

20%

Assignments

5%

25%

20%

20%

Midterm Exam

40%

30%

20%

20%

Final Exam

25%

20%

40%

40%

Grading Policy

Assessment Items

% Marks

1.

Announced Quizzes

20%

3.

Assignments

10%

4.

Mid-Term Exam

30%

5.

Final Exam

40%

Text and Reference Books

Text books:

•        “Thomas’ Calculus” by George B. Thomas, Jr., Maurice D. Weir, Joel R. Hass. 13th Edition 2010. Pearson, USA.

Reference books:

•        “Calculus: Early Transcendentals” by James Stewart. 6th Edition 2008. Brooks/Cole USA.

•        “Calculus” by Swokowski, Olinick, Pence. 6th Edition 1994. PWS, USA.

 

Administrative Instruction

•        According to institute policy, 80% attendance is mandatory to appear in the final examination.

 

•        All quizzes/examinations will be closed book. No calculators and mobile phones will be allowed.

 

•        In any case, there will be no retake of scheduled/surprise quizzes.

 

•        Students may work on home assignments in collaboration with each other, but they must submit their own work; no copying from others. Violation of this will adversely affect their quiz/exam results.

       

Lectures Breakdown

Lecture

Topic

Chapter

01

Real numbers and points. Constants and variables. Absolute values and inequalities. Intervals.

1

02

Functions and graphs. Direct and inverse functions. Symmetry.

1

03

Shifting and scaling of graphs. Classification of functions. Basic elementary functions.

Composite function. Elementary functions.

1

04

Intuitive concepts of limit and continuity. Limits involving infinity. Right and left limits.

2

05

Continuity of functions. Properties of continuous functions.

2

06

Checking for continuity at a point and on an interval. Types of discontinuities.

2

07

Quick review of differentiation. Algebraic and geometric interpretations.

3

08

Derivatives of basic elementary functions. Differentiation rules

3

09

Differentiation of composite functions and chain rule. Implicit differentiation.

3

10

Differentiation of trigonometric, inverse trigonometric, hyperbolic and inverse hyperbolic functions

7

11

Quick revie of functions of 2 & 3 variables and their partial derivatives

14

12

Quick revie of functions of 2 & 3 variables and their partial derivatives. Continue

14

13

Indeterminate forms and L’Hopital rule

7

14

Applied maximum and minimum problems: first derivative test.

4

15

Applied maximum and minimum problems: second derivative test. Points of inflection.

4

16

Intervals of convexity and concavity. Points of Inflection.

4

17

Applied maximum and minimum problems: applications.

4

18

Applied maximum and minimum problems: applications (continued…).

4

19

Indefinite integrals and basic techniques of integration.

5

20

Basic techniques of integration continued.

5

21

Riemann sums and definite integrals.

5

22

The fundamental theorem of calculus. Area under a curve.

5

23

 Properties of definite integrals.

5

24

Calculation of areas bounded by continuous curves.

5

25

Volume of solids of revolution: disk method.

6

26

Volume of solids of revolution: cylindrical shell method.

6

27

Calculation of length of an arc and surface areas of solids of revolution.

6

28

Calculation of work by definite integrals.

6

29

Calculation of work by definite integrals.

6

30

Centre of gravity and centroid of plane laminas.

6

31

Calculation of moments of inertia of solids of revolution.

6

32

Techniques of integration.

8

33

Techniques of integration (continued…).

8

34

Techniques of integration (continued…).

8

35

Convergent and divergent sequences.

10

36

Convergent and divergent series; their basic properties.

10

37

Positive term series; geometric and p-series.

10

38

Integral test and basic comparison test.

10

39

Ratio and root tests.

10

40

Alternating series and its properties.

10

41

Conditional and absolute convergence.

10

42

Power series and radius of convergence.

10

43

Power series representation of function.

10

44

McLaurin and Taylor series.

10

45

Convergent and divergent sequences.

10

 

Note:   This outline serves only as a rough guidance of the course. It may be changed or modified as and when deemed necessary by the instructor. The Instructor is at liberty to best distribute number of lectures and/or change the sequence of topics to cover the entire course.

 

MT102 Calculus II

Syllabus/Course Outline

Calculus II (MT 202)

Fall Semester 2023

Pre-Requisite(s):       MT 101

Instructor:                  Mr. Zahid Ahmed

Office:        Room G-13, FES

Phone:        2536

Email:         zahid.ahmed@giki.edu.pk

Office Hours:             Posted outside office door of course instructor. Also by appointment.

Course Introduction

This course is continuation of MT 101 course. The main objective of the course is to make students proficient in techniques and skills of multivariate and vector calculus. The emphasis will be on application of learned techniques to the solution of problems of science and engineering. The students will learn necessary mathematical skills with an understanding of basic concepts and a working knowledge of applications. It is hoped that, on completion of this course, the students will be trained enough to apply these mathematical tools to solve problems in their area of specialization.

Course Contents

·        Parametric Equations and Polar Coordinates: Parametric representation of plane curves; Calculus with parametric curves; Polar coordinates; Graphing polar equations; Conic sections in polar coordinates; Areas and arc lengths in polar coordinates.

·        Vector Algebra: Vectors in three dimensions; Dot and cross product; Lines and planes; Three dimensional quadric surfaces.

·        Functions of Several Variables: Limits and continuity; Partial derivatives; Increments and differentials; Chain rules; Directional derivatives, gradient; Tangent planes and normal lines to surfaces; Extrema of functions of several variables; Relative extrema, Lagrange multipliers.

·        Multiple Integrals: Double integrals, definition, and evaluation; Area and volume; Double integrals in polar coordinates; Surface area; Triple integrals in Cartesian, cylindrical and spherical coordinates; Applications.

Mapping of CLOs to PLOs

CLO No

Course Learning Outcomes

PLOs

Blooms Taxonomy

CLO 1

Apply calculus of parametric and polar curves to solve engineering problems related to areas, arc lengths and conics.

PLO 1

C3 (Applying)

CLO 2

Demonstrate the understanding of analytic geometry of three dimensions and geometric surfaces of linear and quadratic functions

PLO 1

C3 (Applying)

CLO 3

Apply the techniques of multivariate differential calculus to geometrical and physical problems in science and engineering.

PLO 1

C3 (Applying)

CLO 4

Apply different techniques of multivariate integral calculus of scalar and vector functions to various applied problems.

PLO 1

C3 (Applying)

CLO Assessment Mechanism

Assessment tools

CLO 1

CLO 2

CLO 3

CLO 4

Quizzes

25%

25%

25%

25%

Assignments

5%

5%

5%

5%

Midterm Exam

60%

50%

 

 

Final Exam

10%

20%

70%

70%

Overall Grading Policy

Assessment Items

Percentage

Announced Quizzes

20%

Assignments

10%

Midterm Exam

30%

Final Exam

40%

There will be four announced quizzes. Three best quiz results of each student will be counted for grading purpose.

Text and Reference Books

Textbook:

·        “Thomas’ Calculus” by George B. Thomas, Jr., Maurice D. Weir, Joel R. Hass. 13th Edition 2015. Pearson, USA.

Reference Books:

·        “Calculus: Early Transcendentals” by James Stewart. 6th Edition 2008. Brooks/Cole USA.

·        “Calculus” by Swokowski, Olinick, Pence. 6th Edition 1994. PWS, USA.

·        “Calculus and Analytic Geometry” by Thomas et al 9th Edition, USA.

Administrative Instructions

·        According to institute policy, 80% attendance is mandatory to appear in the final examination.

·        All quizzes/examinations will be closed book. No calculators will be allowed.

·        In any case, there will be no retake of scheduled/surprise quizzes.

·        Assignments must be submitted as per instructions given by the course instructor or mentioned in the assignments.

·        Students may work on home assignments in collaboration with each other, but they must submit their own work; no copying from others. Violation of this will adversely affect their quiz/exam results.

Computer Usage

Students are encouraged to solve some assigned homework problems using the available software such as Mathematica and MATLAB.

Lecture Breakdown

Lecture

Topic

Chapter

01

Parametric representation of plane curves. Calculus with parametric curves.

Chapter 11

02

Parametric representation of plane curves. Calculus with parametric curves.

Chapter 11

03

Polar coordinate system. Sketching of simple polar curves.

Chapter 11

04

Some important polar curves

Chapter 11

05

Conic sections in polar coordinates.

Chapter 11

06

Conic sections in polar coordinates (continued…).

Chapter 11

07

Conic sections in polar coordinates (continued…).

Chapter 11

08

Area and arc length in polar coordinates.

Chapter 11

09

Vectors in two dimensions and problems.

Chapter 12

10

Vectors in three dimensions and problems.

Chapter 12

11

Scalar product.

Chapter 12

12

Vector product.

Chapter 12

13

Analytic Geometry of planes.

Chapter 12

14

Straight lines in three dimensions.

Chapter 12

15

Quadric surfaces.

Chapter 12

16

Quadric surfaces (continued…).

Chapter 12

17

Quadric surfaces (continued…).

Chapter 12

18

Functions of several variables

Chapter 14

19

Limit of functions of several variables.

Chapter 14

20

Continuity of functions of several variables.

Chapter 14

21

Partial derivatives and related questions.

Chapter 14

22

Increments, differentials, and chain rules.

Chapter 14

23

Directional derivatives and gradient.

Chapter 14

24

Tangent planes and normal planes.

Chapter 14

25

Extrema of function of several variables.

Chapter 14

26

Extrema of function of several variables (continued…).

Chapter 14

27

Lagrange multipliers and their applications.

Chapter 14

28

Lagrange multipliers and their applications (continued…).

Chapter 14

29

Double integrals.

Chapter 15

30

Area and volume by double integrals.

Chapter 15

31

Area and volume by double integrals (continued…).

Chapter 15

32

Area and volume by double integrals (continued…).

Chapter 15

33

Change of variables in double integrals.

Chapter 15

34

Change of variables in double integrals (continued…).

Chapter 15

34

Double integral in polar coordinates.

Chapter 15

36

Surface area and problems.

Chapter 15

37

Applications of double integrals.

Chapter 15

38

Triple integrals of all types.

Chapter 15

39

Volume by triple integrals.

Chapter 15

40

Volume by triple integrals (continued…).

Chapter 15

41

Change of variables in triple integrals.

Chapter 15

42

Triple integrals in cylindrical coordinates.

Chapter 15

43

Triple integrals in spherical coordinates.

Chapter 15

44

Volumes by using cylindrical and spherical coordinates.

Chapter 15

45

Revision and exercises.

 

          

Note:   This outline and lecture distribution serves only as rough guidance of the course. It may be changed or modified as and when deemed necessary by the instructor. The instructor is at liberty to best distribute the number of lectures and/or change the sequence of topics to cover the entire course.

ES111 Probabiity and Statistics

 

 

ES111 Probability and Statistics (3 Credit Hours) – Spring 2023

Pre-Requisite: MT 101 Calculus I

Instructors: Dr. M. Omer Bin Saeed

Email: omer.saeed@giki.edu.pk  

Office Hours:  Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday 10:30 – 11:30. Or by appointment.

Course Introduction

This course introduces the students to the fundamentals of probability theory, engineering statistics, and data analysis. The first one half of the course develops necessary “Probability Theory” that is used to analyze the random processes occurring in natural sciences and engineering. The second half of the course is about “Inferential Statistics” where the students learn the techniques of analyzing the statistical data and making inferences about population using sample data. Statistical tests are developed using the probability theory learned in first half of the course. The emphasis is on using statistical methods to the problems of applied science and engineering. Students are expected to have good background of analytical skills for this course. On completion of this course, the students will be trained enough to appreciate the power of statistical techniques and apply these tools to analyze problems in their areas.

Course Contents

·        Introduction to Probability: Basic definitions, axioms of probability, addition and multiplication rules, conditional probabilities, independence, and Bayes’ rule, revision of permutations and combinations.

·        Probability Distributions: Random variables and probability distributions, discrete and continuous RVs, probability mass function, density function, and cumulative distribution function, mean, variance, higher moments, and their calculation.

·        Discrete Distributions: Binomial, Poisson, and hyper geometric distributions, mean and variance of standard discrete distributions.

·        Continuous Distributions: Uniform, exponential, and normal distributions, standard normal distribution and calculation of normal probabilities using tables, mean and variance of standard continuous distributions.

·        Joint Distributions: Joint distributions of two random variables, discrete and continuous joint probability distributions, marginal probability distributions, independence and covariance of joint probability distributions.

·        Descriptive Statistics and Random Sampling: Data arrangement, measures of central tendency, spread and variability, frequency distributions and histograms, plots of data, random sampling, distribution of sample mean and variance.

·        Estimation Theory: Estimation of unknown parameters of a population distribution, point estimation, interval estimation, standard error of estimation and margin of error, confidence intervals of mean and proportion, calculation of sample size, small sample theory and t-distribution, comparison of two populations and two sample estimation, confidence interval of population proportions and variance, chi-square and f-distributions.

·        Hypothesis Testing: Statistical hypotheses, one and two tail tests, significance and confidence levels, relationship with interval estimation, critical regions, type I and type II errors, chi-square test.

·        Regression Analysis: Simple linear regression, the method of least squares, inferences based on least-square estimators, curvilinear regression, adequacy of the regression model, correlation.

·        Design of Experiments: One-factor experiments, response variable, pairwise comparisons in one-factor experiments, two-factor experiments, error correction, case study and use of statistical tools.

Mapping of CLOs & PLOs

By the end of the course, the student will be able to:

CLOs

Course Learning Outcomes

PLOs

Blooms Taxonomy

CLO-1

Calculate probabilities of events, joint probabilities, conditional probabilities using set operations and definition of probability. Justify valid and invalid probability assignments and independence of events.

PLO-2

(Problem analysis)

Cognitive Level-3 (Applying)

 

CLO-2

Calculate probability mass/density function parameters, moments and functions of random variables.

PLO-2

(Problem analysis)

Cognitive Level-3 (Applying)

 

CLO-3

Draw inferences about population and sample data using techniques of “Inferential Statistics”.

PLO-2

(Problem analysis)

Cognitive Level-4 (Analyzing)

CLO-4

Solve problems related to basic estimators and design of experiments

PLO-2

(Problem analysis)

Cognitive Level-3 (Applying)

CLO-5

Demonstrate ability to implement learned concepts in a modern tool (such as R, Python)

PLO-2

(Problem analysis)

Cognitive Level-3 (Applying)

CLOs Direct Assessment Mechanism

CLO #

Assessment Tools

CLO1

Quizzes, Assignments, Midterm Exam, Final Exam

CLO2

Quizzes, Assignments, Midterm Exam, Final Exam

CLO3

Quizzes, Assignments, Final Exam

CLO4

Quizzes, Assignments, CEP, Final Exam

CLO 5

Assignments, CEP

 

 

Overall Grading Policy

Assessment Tools

Percentage

Quizzes (Surprise + Scheduled)

15%

Assignments

10%

CEP

5%

Midterm Examination

30%

Final Examination

40%

Text and Reference Books

Text Book:

1.      Probability and Statistics for Engineers & Scientists by R. E. Walpole (9th Ed., Prentice-Hall, 2012).  

Reference Books:

1.      Probability and Statistics for Engineers (Miller & Freund’s) by Richard A. Johnson (9th Ed., Pearson USA, 2017).

2.      Probability and Statistics for Engineering and Sciences by Jay L. Devore, (8th Ed., Brooks/Cole USA, 2012).

Administrative Instructions

§  According to institute policy, 80% attendance is mandatory to appear in the final examination.

§  Assignments must be submitted as per instructions given for each assignment.

§  In any case, there will be no retake of (scheduled/surprise) quizzes.

§  Mobile phones are not allowed during quizzes and exams.

§  Bring calculator/statistical tables in lecture classes.

Computer Usage

Students are encouraged to solve some assigned homework problems using the available statistical software.

 

Lecture Breakdown (subject to change)

Lecture

Topics

CLO

1

Overview of Probability and Statistics

 

1, 5

2

Revision of set algebra and simple combinatorics

3

Basic definitions and axioms of probability

4

Addition and multiplication rules of probability

5

Conditional probabilities and independence

6

Law of total probability and Baye’s rule

7

Joint probability distributions

8

Marginal distributions

9

Indenpendence and covariance in joint distributions

10

Random Variables and Probability Distributions

 

2, 5

11

Discrete and continuous RVs

12

Probability mass function, density function

13

Cumulative distribution function

14

Expected value of a random variable and its calculation

15

Variance of a random variable and its calculation

16-17

Binomial distribution and its mean and variance

18-19

Poisson distribution and its mean and variance

20

Hypergeometric distribution and its mean and variance

21

Uniform distribution and its mean and variance

22

Exponential distribution and its mean and variance

23-24

Normal distribution and its mean and variance

25

Data arrangement and central tendency

3, 5

26

Spread and variability

27

Frequency distributions and histograms, plots of data

28

Random sampling, distribution of sample mean and variance

29

Point estimation, standard error and MSE

30

Problems on point estimation

31-32

Confidence intervals of mean and variance in different situations

33

Sample size, small sample theory and t-distribution

34

Confidence interval of population proportion

35

Statistical hypotheses and one and two tail tests

36

Type I and type II errors, critical regions

37

Hypothesis testing on mean, variance and population proportion

38

Simple linear regression, the method of least squares

4, 5

39

Inferences based on least-square estimators

40

Curvilinear regression, adequacy of the regression model, correlation

41

One-factor experiments, response variable

42

Pairwise comparisons in one-factor experiments

43

Two-factor experiments, error correction

44-45

Revision

 

 

***All the Best***

ES202 Engineering Statistics

ES-202 Engineering Statistics (Spring 2022)

Pre-Requisite:  MT-101 (Calculus I)                                                                                                                                                                        

Instructor: Ms. Sana Tahir (Section C)

                    Office: Room G-21, FES

                    Email: sana.tahir@giki.edu.pk

Discussion Hours: By appointment.

Course Introduction

This course is a basic engineering course that introduces the students to the fundamentals of probability theory, engineering statistics, and data analysis. The first one half of the course develops necessary “Probability Theory” that is used to analyze the random processes occurring in natural sciences and engineering. The second half of the course is about “Inferential Statistics” where the students learn the techniques of analyzing the statistical data and making inferences about population using sample data. Statistical tests are developed using the probability theory learned in first half of the course. The emphasis is on using statistical methods to the problems of applied science and engineering. Students are expected to have good background of analytical skills for this course. On completion of this course, the students will be trained enough to appreciate the power of statistical techniques and apply these tools to analyze problems in their areas.

Course Contents

Introduction to Probability: Basic definitions, axioms of probability, addition and multiplication rules, conditional probabilities, independence, and Baye’s rule, revision of permutations and combinations.

Probability Distributions: Random variables and probability distributions, discrete and continuous RVs, probability mass function, density function, and cumulative distribution function, mean, variance, higher moments and their calculation.

Discrete Distributions: Binomial, Poisson, geometric, hyper geometric, negative binomial, and multinomial distributions, mean and variance of standard discrete distributions.

Continuous Distributions: Exponential, gamma, and normal distributions, mean and variance of standard continuous distributions.

Normal Distribution: Normal distribution and its mean and variance, standard normal distribution and calculation of normal probabilities using tables, approximation of binomial distribution by normal distribution.

Descriptive Statistics and Random Sampling: Data arrangement, measures of central tendency, spread and variability, frequency distributions and histograms, plots of data, random sampling, distribution of sample mean and variance.

Estimation Theory: Point estimation and estimators of unknown parameters, estimation of unknown parameters of a population distribution, methods of moments and method of maximum likelihood, unbiased point estimators of mean and variance, interval estimation, standard error of estimation and margin of error, confidence intervals of mean and proportion, calculation of sample size, small sample theory and -distribution, comparison of two populations and two sample estimation, confidence interval of population proportions and variance, chi-square and f-distributions.

Hypothesis Testing: Statistical hypotheses, one and two tail tests, significance and confidence levels, relationship with interval estimation, critical regions, type I and type II errors, chi-square test.

Mapping of Class Learning Outcome (CLOs) to Program Learning Outcomes (PLOs)

CLOs

Course Learning Outcomes

PLOs

Bloom’s Taxonomy

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

CLO-1

Calculate probabilities of events, joint probabilities, conditional probabilities using set operations and definition of probability. Justify valid and invalid probability assignments and independence of events.

PLO-2

(Problem analysis)

C3 (Applying)

CLO-2

Calculate the probability mass/density function parameters, moments and functions of random variables.

PLO-2

(Problem analysis)

C3 (Applying)

 

CLO-3

Draw inferences about population and sample data using techniques of “Inferential Statistics”.

PLO-2

(Problem analysis)

C5 (Evaluating)

CLOs Direct Assessment Mechanism

CLO #

Assessment Tools

CLO1

Quizzes, Assignments, Midterm Exam, Final Exam

CLO2

Quizzes, Assignments, Midterm Exam, Final Exam

CLO3

Quizzes, Assignments, Final Exam

Grading Policy

Assessment Items

% Marks

1.

Assignments

10%

2.

Quizzes

20%

3.

Mid-Term Exam

30%

4.

Final Exams

40%

Text and Reference Books

Textbook:

·        Probability and Statistics for Engineers and Scientists by Ronald E. Walpole, Raymond H. Myers, Sharon L. Myers & Keying Ye (9th Edition, Pearson USA, 2011).

Reference books:

·        Probability and Statistics for Engineering and Sciences by Jay L. Devore (9th Edition 2015, Brooks/Cole USA).

·        Probability and Statistics for Engineers (Miller & Freund’s) by Richard A. Johnson (9th Edition, Pearson USA, 2017).

Computer Usage

Students are encouraged to solve some assigned homework problems using the available statistical software.

Administrative Instructions

·       Student Attendance is expected to be 100%, and minimum 80% (mandatory) attendance that is required to appear in the final exams

·       All direct assessments, i.e., Quizzes, Assignments, Midterm and Final, must be attempted.

Lecture Breakdown

Lecture

Topic

Lecture 01

Overview of Engineering Statistics

Lecture 02

Revision of set algebra and simple combinatorics

Lecture 03

Basic definitions and axioms of probability

Lecture 04

Addition and multiplication rules of probability

Lecture 05

Conditional probabilities and independence

Lecture 06

Law of total probability and Baye’s rule

Lecture 07

Random variables and probability distributions

Lecture 08

Discrete and continuous RVs

Lecture 09

Probability mass function, density function

Lecture 10

Cumulative distribution function

Lecture 11

Expected value of pdf and its calculation

Lecture 12

Variance of pdf and its calculation

Lecture 13

Binomial distribution and its mean and variance

Lecture 14

Continue binomial distribution

Lecture 15

Poisson distribution and its mean and variance

Lecture 16

Continue Poisson distribution

Lecture 17

Geometric and hypergeometric distribution and their mean and variance

Lecture 18

Negative binomial distribution and its mean and variance

Lecture 19

Normal distribution and its mean and variance

Lecture 20

Continue normal distribution

Lecture 21

Approximation of binomial by normal distribution

Lecture 22

Exponential distribution and its mean and variance

Lecture 23

Gamma distribution and its mean and variance

Lecture 24

Calculation of normal probabilities using tables

Lecture 25

Approximation of binomial distribution by normal distribution

Lecture 26

Data arrangement and central tendency

Lecture 27

Spread and variability

Lecture 28

Frequency distributions and histograms, plots of data

Lecture 29

Random sampling, distribution of sample mean and variance

Lecture 30

Point estimation & estimators of unknown parameters

Lecture 31

Estimation of unknown parameters of a population distribution

Lecture 32

Types of estimator, standard error and MSE

Lecture 33

Methods of moments

Lecture 34

Method of maximum likelihood

Lecture 35

Further problems on point estimation

Lecture 36

Confidence intervals, calculation of small sample theory and -distribution

Lecture 37

Confidence intervals of mean and variance in different situations

Lecture 38

Continue confidence intervals of mean and variance

Lecture 39

Sample size, small sample theory and t-distribution

Lecture 40

Confidence interval of population proportion

Lecture 41

Statistical hypotheses and one and two tail tests

Lecture 42

Type I and type II errors

Lecture 43

P-values and critical regions

Lecture 44

Hypothesis testing on mean, variance and population proportion

Lecture 45

Problems on hypothesis testing

       

 

Note: This outline serves only as a rough guidance of the course. It may be changed or modified as and when deemed necessary by the instructor. The instructor is at liberty to best distribute number of lectures and/or change the sequence of topics to cover the entire course.

ES 211  Circuit Analysis I  

 

ES 211  Circuit Analysis – I          Fall 2023

Pre-Requisite(s): MT101, MT102 (co-requisite)

Instructor:  Dr. Usman Habib

Email: usman.habib@giki.edu.pk

Office G 26 FES Building

Office hours: Tuesdays and Wednesdays [10am – 2pm]  

Course Introduction

The course deals with the fundaments of Circuit Analysis Techniques. Students after the completion of the course should be able to analyze dc circuits by using the laws of electric circuits and employing various techniques such as Mesh analysis, Nodal analysis, and Equivalent Resistance Combinations, along with theorems such as Superposition, Thevenin’s, and Norton’s theorems.; and do transient analysis of circuits containing inductors and Capacitors.  Operational Amplifier is also introduced to enable students to model it and analyze circuits containing operational amplifiers. Finally, the frequency domain analysis of the DC circuits is discussed.

 

Course Content

Basic Concepts, resistive circuits, nodal and loop analysis techniques, operational amplifiers, additional analysis techniques such as using superposition, Thevenin’s and Norton’s Theorems, capacitance and inductance, first- and second-order transient circuits.

Mapping of  Course Learning Outcomes (CLOs) to  Program Learning Outcomes (PLOs)

S. No

CLOs

PLOs

Bloom Taxonomy

CLO1

Use basic electrical concepts and theorems to analyze circuits

PLO1 (Engineering Knowledge)

C3 (Application)

CLO2

Identify the key characteristics and limitations of operational amplifiers and be able to analyze and design simple circuits based on

operational amplifiers

PLO1 (Engineering Knowledge)

C4 (Analysis)

CLO3

Compute the behavior of energy storing elements and their transient response analysis

PLO1 (Engineering Knowledge)

C3

(Application)

CLO4

Justify the impact of electric circuits on environment and demonstrate their knowledge and need for sustainable development

PLO7 (Environment and Sustainability)

A3 (Valuing)

CLO5

Communicate effectively about practical uses of electric circuits

PLO10 (Communication)

A2 (Responding)

Grading Policy

Assessment Items

% Marks

1.

Quizzes (5 Quizzes)

15 %

2.

Assignments (5 Assignments)

5 %

3.

Technical Reports (2 reports)

5 %

4.

Presentation

5 %

5.

Mid-Term Exam

25 %

6.

Final Exams

45 %

 

Text and Reference Books

Text books:  

·        Basic Engineering Circuit Analysis, by J. David Irwin and Robert M. Nelms, 11th Edition, ©2015

·        Engineering Circuit Analysis 8th Edition by William Hayt, Jack Kemmerly and Steven Durbin

Reference books:

1.      Circuit Analysis for Dummies, by John Santiago, ©2013

2.      Circuit Analysis Demystified, by David McMahon, ©2007

 

Administrative Instruction

·       Student Attendance is expected to be 100%,  and minimum 80% (mandatory) attendance that is required to sit in the final exams

·       Student must pay the attention for reading the text books chapter for course assessment rather than lecture slides.

·        All the direct assessment tools i.e., Quizzes, Assignment, Midterm and final Exams must be attempted.  Failure to attempt in any of the assessment tools without any medical reasons may results to fail in that particular assessment.

·        For queries, kindly follow the office hours in order to avoid any inconvenience. However I may be contacted anytime by getting appointment using email or telephonically

 

Lecture Breakdown (Every lecture is 1 CH)

Lecture # 1

Introduction to the course contents, benchmarks and basic definitions

Lecture # 2

Units and Basic Quantities, Basic Concepts of charge, voltage and current

Lecture # 3

Power, Conductance, sign conventions, polarity and direction of flow of current

Lecture # 4

Circuit Elements, independent and dependent sources, Tellegen’s theorem

Lecture # 5

Basics of Kirchhoff’s Voltage Law (KVL) and Current Law (KCL)

Lecture # 6

Resistive Circuits in series and parallel: Ohm’s Law, Single loop circuits

Lecture # 7

Voltage Division Law and Current Division Law

Lecture # 8

Wye ↔ Delta Transformations, Source Transformations

Lecture # 9

Nodal Analysis

Lecture # 10

Nodal Analysis (circuits containing dependent sources)

Lecture # 11

Super Node

Lecture # 12

Loop Analysis

Lecture # 13

Loop Analysis (circuits containing dependent sources)

Lecture # 14

Super mesh

Lecture # 15

Problem solving

Lecture # 16

Operational Amplifiers: Introduction, Op-Amp Model and its circuits

Lecture # 17

Inverting and non-inverting operation

Lecture # 18

Differential and comparator operation

Lecture # 19

Problem Solving for Op-Amp circuits

Lecture # 20

Superposition Theorem

Lecture # 21

Problem Solving

Lecture # 22

Circuits with dependent sources

Lecture # 23

Thévenin’s Theorem

Lecture # 24

Thévenin’s Theorem, cont’d

Mid Term Exam

Lecture # 25

Norton’s Theorem

Lecture # 26

Norton’s Theorem, cont’d

Lecture # 27

Source Transformation

Lecture # 28

Circuits with dependent sources only

Lecture # 29

Circuits with dependent  and independent sources

Lecture # 30

Maximum Power Transfer Theorem and problem solving

Lecture # 31

Capacitor

Lecture # 32

Inductor

Lecture # 33

Capacitor and Inductor in series and parallel

Lecture # 34

Capacitor and Inductor Combinations

Lecture # 35

Problem solving

Lecture # 36

First order circuits with natural response only

Lecture # 37

First order circuits with constant excitation Differential Equation Approach

Lecture # 38

Step by step approach to solve first order circuits

Lecture # 39

Step by step approach with dependent sources

Lecture # 40

Second-Order Circuits

Lecture # 41

Second-Order Circuits, Cont’d, Problem solving for chapter 7

Lecture # 42

Bridge circuits, op-amp bridge amplifier circuits

Lecture # 43

Frequency domain analysis (Phasors)

Lecture # 44

Circuit analysis techniques for Frequency domain networks

Lecture # 45

Problem solving for frequency domain analysis

Final Term Exam

 

Benchmark for course contents: https://eng.ox.ac.uk/media/4093/course-handbook-prelims-17-18-accessible.pdf

 

ES214 Circuit Analysis II

 

ES 214 Circuit Analysis – II             Spring 2023 (3 Credit Hours)

Pre-Requisite(s): ES211/EE211 Instructor: Dr Usman Habib

Email: usman.habib@giki.edu.pk

Office G 21 FES Building (Ext 2290)

Office hours: Tuesdays [12.30 pm– 2.30pm]; Thursdays [12.30pm –2.30pm]

Course Introduction

This is a 3 credit hour course; offered as an extension to DC Circuit Analysis. In this course, advanced techniques such as Frequency Domain Analysis via poles and zeroes in the complex plane, Variable-frequency network performance, Laplace and Fourier transformation techniques to analyze AC circuits in steady-state conditions. Other topics include analysis of magnetically coupled circuits, three phase circuits, Input – output characterization of a circuit as a two-port network.

Course Content

AC Steady-State Power Analysis, Phasors, Steady-State Power Analysis, Variable-Frequency Network Performance, Complex impedance, power factor, mutual inductance and ideal transformers, frequency response of AC networks including Bode diagrams, second-order and resonant circuits, damping and Q factors. Laplace transform methods for transient circuit analysis with zero initial conditions, Fourier analysis Techniques, Impulse and step responses of second-order networks and resonant circuits, Two-Port Network

Mapping of Class Learning Outcome (CLOs) to Program Learning Outcomes (PLOs)

S. No

CLOS

PLOs

Bloom Taxonomy

CLO1

To be able to solve AC circuits in frequency domain by applying circuit analysis techniques

PLO 2: Problem Analysis

C3 (Apply)

CLO2

Ability to model and solve the transient circuits in frequency domain using Laplace transform and apply the Fourier transform for steady-state analysis

PLO 2: Problem Analysis

C3 (Apply)

CLO3

Be able to analyze RLC circuits for variable frequency networks

PLO 4 (Investigation)

C4 (Analyze)

CLO4

To evaluate a solution for environment and sustainability (such as redesigning a circuit for power factor correction)

PLO 7: Environment and Sustainability

A3 (Valuing)

CLO5

To be able to identify a solution for an engineering circuits problem to improve the quality of life in society (such as filter design for a daily use application or improving fault protection for personnel)

PLO 6: The Engineer and Society

C4 (Analyze)

CLOs Direct Assessment Mechanism

 

CLO #

Assessment Tools

CLO1

Quizzes, Assignments, Midterm Exam

CLO2

Quizzes, Assignments, Midterm Exam, Final Exam

CLO3

Quizzes, Assignments, Final Exam

CLO4

Quizzes + Report

CLO5

Quizzes + Short Report + Presentation

 

 

Assessment Items

% Marks

1.

Quizzes

23 % (6 Quizzes in total)

2.

Assignments

7 %

3.

Technical Reports and presentation

5 %

4.

Mid-Term Exam

25 %

5.

Final Exams

40 %

Text and Reference Books

Text book:

Engineering Circuit Analysis, by J. David Irwin and Robert M. Nelms, 11th Edition, ©2015

Reference books:

1.      Engineering Circuit Analysis, 8th Edition by W.H. Hayt & J.E. Kemerly; McGraw Hill; Aug 2011

2.      Electric circuits, 10th Edition Author(s): Nilsson and Riedel, Pearson Publishers, 2019

3.      Circuit Analysis Demystified, by David McMahon, ©2007

 

Administrative Instruction

·       Student Attendance is expected to be 100%, and minimum 80% (mandatory) attendance is  required to sit in the final exams

·        All the direct assessment tools i.e., Quizzes, Assignment, Midterm and final Exams must be attempted. Failure to attempt in any of the assessment tools without any medical reasons may results to fail in that particular assessment.

·        In any case, there will be no retake of (scheduled/surprise) quizzes

·        For queries, kindly follow the office hours in order to avoid any inconvenience. However I may be  contacted anytime by getting appointment using email or telephonically

Lecture Breakdown (Every lecture is 1 CH)

Lecture # 1

Introduction to the course contents, benchmarks and review of circuit analysis I

Lecture # 2

Sinusoidal and complex forcing functions

Lecture # 3

Solving a circuit with forcing function represented as complex number, exponential and phasor

Lecture # 4

Phasor relation for circuit elements

Lecture # 5

Impedance and admittance, Phase Diagrams

Lecture # 6

Solving circuits with reactance in series and parallel

Lecture # 7

Phasor analysis using Kirchhoff’s laws (KVL and KCL)

Lecture # 8

Problem solving with phasors (Thevenin, Norton, Superposition)

Lecture # 9

Maximum average power transfer

Lecture # 10

Instantaneous, average, RMS, effective and complex power

Lecture # 11

Power factor and its correction

Lecture # 12

Single phase three wire circuits, Safety considerations

Lecture # 13

Problem solving for steady state power analysis

Lecture # 14

Magnetically coupled networks

Lecture # 15

Mutual inductance, energy analysis

Lecture # 16

Transformers

Lecture # 17

Problem solving for power analysis

Lecture # 18

Equivalent circuit for transformers

Lecture # 19

Three phase circuits and connections

Lecture # 20

Source and load connections

Lecture # 21

Problem analysis for different configuration of sources and loads

Lecture # 22

Power relationship and power factor correction in three phase circuits

Lecture # 23

Review of chapter 8,9,10 and 11 with important concepts for solving complex problems

Lecture # 24

Extra topics related to power generation and transmission circuits

Mid Term Exam

Lecture # 25

Variable Frequency Response Analysis, Network Functions

Lecture # 26

Poles and Zeros, Sinusoidal Frequency Analysis

Lecture # 27

Bode Plots of simple factors

Lecture # 28

Finding H(jω) from Bode Plot

Lecture # 29

Resonant Circuits; Series Resonance

Lecture # 30

Problem solving for resonant circuits

Lecture # 31

Filter Networks

Lecture # 32

Problem solving for filters

Lecture # 33

Filter design problem

Lecture # 34

The Laplace Transform; Basics, Singularity Functions etc.

Lecture # 35

Properties of the Transform, Inverse transform

Lecture # 36

Problem solving using Laplace Transform

Lecture # 37

Solving differential equation with Laplace

Lecture # 38

Applications of Laplace Transform

Lecture # 39

Steady state response using Laplace, Transfer function

Lecture # 40

Fourier Series

Lecture # 41

Frequency spectral contents, waveforms

Lecture # 42

Circuit analysis using Fourier method

Lecture # 43

Fourier Transform

Lecture # 44

Two port network (AC analysis)

Lecture # 45

Problem solving using two port network

Final Term Exam

       

 

Benchmark for the course contents:

https://eng.ox.ac.uk/media/4093/course-handbook-prelims-17-18-accessible.pdf

ES 231 Electronics I

 
 

 

ES231-Electronics – I Spring 2023

Pre-Requisite(s): ES211/EE211

Instructor:  Engr. Muhammad Saqib

Email: muhammd.saqib@giki.edu.pk

Office G 64, FES Building

Office hours:  Mondays [10.30 – 11.30 am and 12.30 – 1.30pm]; Wednesdays [10.30 – 11.30am and 12.30 – 1.30pm]; Thursdays [10.30am – 12.30pm]

Website: https://giki.edu.pk/personnel/muhammad-saqib/

Course Introduction

This is a 3-credit hour course that introduces electronic devices; diodes, bipolar junction transistors (BJTs) and field effect transistors (FETs). The terminal behavior of these devices is discussed. The main focus is to develop the ability to analyze and design basic analog electronic circuits. Small signal analysis and low frequency operation is mainly considered.

Course Content

Introduction to electronics, semiconductor diode, diode applications, bipolar junction transistor, transistor configuration, DC biasing, field effect transistor, BJT and FET small signals equivalent circuit models, design of BJT and FET amplifiers and differential amplifiers.

Mapping of  Class Learning Outcome (CLOs) to  Program Learning Outcomes (PLOs)

S. No

CLOS

PLOs

Bloom Taxonomy

CLO1

Ability to analyze the diode circuits with various type of configurations

PLO2 (Problem Analysis)

C4 (Analysis)

CLO2

Ability to analyze the circuits containing bipolar junction transistors (BJTs)

CLO3

Ability to analyze the circuits containing field effect transistors (FETs).

Grading Policy

Assessment Items

% Marks

1.

Quizzes

20%

2.

Assignments and Complex Engineering Problem

10%

3.

Mid-Term Exam

30%

4.

Final Exams

40%

Text and Reference Books

Text book:

Electronic Devices and Circuit Theory, R. L. Boylestad and L. Nashelsky, 11th Edition,  © 2013

Reference books:

·   Microelectronic Circuits, Adel S. Sedra, Kenneth C. (KC) Smith, Tony Chan Carusone, and Vincent Gaudet, 8th Edition, Publication Date – November 2019

·   Microelectronic Circuits, Adel S. Sedra, Kenneth C. (KC) Smith, 7th Edition ©2015

·   Engineering Circuit Analysis, by J. David Irwin and Robert M. Nelms, 11th Edition, ©2015

Administrative Instruction

·       Student Attendance is expected to be 100%,  and minimum 80% (mandatory) attendance that is required to sit in the final exams

·       Student must pay the attention for reading the text books chapter for course assessment rather than lecture slides.

·        All the direct assessment tools i.e., Quizzes, Assignment, Midterm and final Exams must be attempted.  Failure to attempt in any of the assessment tools without any medical reasons may results to fail in that particular assessment.

·        In any case, there will be no retake of (scheduled/surprise) quizzes

·        For queries, kindly follow the office hours in order to avoid any inconvenience. However I may be contacted anytime by getting appointment using email or telephonically

Lecture Breakdown

Lecture#1

Introduction. Semiconductor Diode, Ideal Versus Practical Diode

Lecture#2

Energy diagram for solids (conductors, Semiconductors and Insulators)

Lecture#3

The properties of N-type and P-type materials, explanation with various examples

Lecture#4

Formation of PN junction, Biasing of PN junctions

Lecture#5

Basic characteristics of ideal and non-ideal PN-diode

Lecture#6

Problems

Lecture#7

Load-Line Analysis

Lecture#8

Problems

Lecture#9

Series Diode Configurations, Parallel and Series–Parallel Configurations

Lecture#10

Half Wave Rectifier

Lecture#11

Full Wave Rectifier

Lecture#12

Series Clipper

Lecture#13

Parallel Clipper

Lecture#14

Series Clamper

Lecture#15

Parallel Clamper

Lecture#16

Introduction to BJTs; §3.3,3.4

Lecture#17

Common Base and Emitter Configuration§3.4 and 3.5

Lecture#18

Common Collector Configuration§3.6 and 3.7

Lecture#19

Diode Clippers and Clampers (reviewed) §2.8 & 2.9

Lecture#20

Fixed Biasing of Common Emitter Transistor§4.3

Lecture#21

Load line Analysis, and Emitter Bias Configuration §4.3 & 4.4

Lecture#22

Voltage Divider Bias Configuration §4.5

Lecture#23

Problems and Revision

Lecture#24

Problems and Revision

 

Lecture#25

Review of Mid Exam question paper

Lecture#26

§5.1 – 5.4; Introduction to AC Analysis of BJTs and  BJTs Modeling

Lecture#27

§5.4(review), 5.5 and 5.6; Modeling of CE Fixed bias and Resistive division circuit

Lecture#28

§5.7; (CE amplifier with RE) and other types CC, CB, Darlington pair etc discussed.

Lecture#29

§6.1 and 2; (JFET Introduction, construction and operation)

Lecture#30

§6.3 and §6.7; ( Characteristic curve of JFET, Shockley equation; and Depletion mode MOSFET)

Lecture#31

§6.8 – 6.10; ( Enhancement mode MOSFET, VMOS and UMOS)

Lecture#32

§6.11 and 6.12; ( CMOS Logic and MESFET)

Lecture#33

§7.1 – 7.3; FET biasing, JFET Fixed-bias and Self-bias configurations

Lecture#34

§7.4 – 7.7; JFET – voltage divider bias and Depletion Mode MOSFET biasing

Lecture#35

§7.8 – till end; Enhancement Mode MOSFET biasing techniques and summary

Lecture#36

§8.1 and 2; FET amplifier introduction and JFET small signal model

Lecture#37

§8.3; Fixed Bias Configuration

Lecture#38

§9.1 – 9.6; Frequency response plots

Lecture#39

§9.6; Low frequency analysis

Lecture#40

§9.7 and 9.8; Low frequency response – BJT Effects of CS, CE CC and RS

Lecture#41

Problems

Lecture#42

§9.9 and 9.10; Low Frequency Response of FETs and Miller Effect

Lecture#43

Chapter 9 Overview

Lecture#44

Revision and Problem Solving

Lecture#45

Revision and Problem Solving

       

 

INSTRUCTIONS/SUGGESTIONS FOR STUDENTS:

  • Class participation will develop more interest and understanding about the course.
  • Solving assignment will help in surprise & announced quizzes. 
  • Group discussion explores new ideas and always recommended.
  • Students must bring their text book or reading materials in every lecture.  
  • Questions are always welcomed and students can visit office in office hours or email their queries.

 

 

ES 332 Signals and Systems

You can download full lecture notes here and view lecture recordings here. Sample exams here.
ES332 Signals and Systems (3 Credit Hours) – Fall 2022

Pre-Requisite: ES214 Circuit Analysis II

Instructors: Dr. Naveed R. Butt

 Office # G-6 FES, GIK Institute, Email: naveed.butt@giki.edu.pk

Office Hours:  1300 – 1500 Hrs.

Course Introduction
The aim of this course is to introduce the students to basic types of signals and systems encountered in engineering and to various important properties of these systems. The focus will be on methods for characterizing and analyzing continuous-time and discrete-time signals and systems. Students are also exposed to some mathematical techniques (Laplace transform, z-transform, and Fourier transform) that are useful for the understanding of higher-level courses in communications, control, and signal processing.
Course Contents

·                            Introduction to signals and systems

·                            Continuous-time signals and systems

·                            Discrete-time signals and systems

·                            The Laplace transforms

·                            The z-transform

·                            Frequency Analysis: The Fourier series and transforms

·                            Selected applications

Mapping of CLOs & PLOs
By the end of the course, the student will be able to:
CLOsCourse Learning OutcomesPLOsBlooms Taxonomy
CLO-1Apply knowledge of signals and systems to categorize, and perform basic operations on, signals and systems.

PLO-1

(Engineering Knowledge)

Cognitive Level-3 (Applying)

 

CLO-2Calculate parameters related to continuous-time and discrete-time signals and systems in the time domain.

PLO-1

(Engineering Knowledge)

Cognitive Level-3 (Applying)

 

CLO-3Analyze continuous-time and discrete-time signals and systems in the transform domains including Laplace, Fourier, and Z transforms

PLO-2

( Problem Analysis )

Cognitive Level-4 (Analyzing)
CLO-4Investigate applied problems  related  to signals and systems and formally present the results.

PLO-4

(Investigation)

Cognitive Level-5 (Evaluating)

 

CLO-5Attend three engineering, science, and technology related seminars/talks (physical, online, recorded) and critically analyze their strong and weak points.

PLO-12

(Lifelong Learning)

Affective Level-4 (Valuing)
CLOs Direct Assessment Mechanism
CLO #Assessment Tools
CLO1Quizzes, Assignments, Viva, Midterm Exam, Final Exam
CLO2Quizzes, Assignments, Viva, Midterm Exam, Final Exam
CLO3Quizzes, Assignments, Viva, Midterm Exam, Final Exam
CLO4Report + Viva + Presentation
CLO5Assignment

 

Overall Grading Policy
Assessment ToolsPercentage
Quizzes (Surprise + Scheduled) + Viva15%
Assignments + Viva12%
Midterm Examination20%
Course Project (Complex Engineering Problem)13%
Final Examination40%
Text and Reference Books

Besides the handouts given in class, following reference materials shall be used:

Text Book:

1.                Lathi, B. P., and Green R. A., Linear Systems and Signals (3rd ed.), NY: Oxford University Press (2018)

Reference Books:

1.                Oppenheim, A.V., Willsky, A.S., Nawab, H., Signals and Systems (2nd ed.), Prentice Hall (1996)

2.                Phillips, C. L., Parr, J. M., Riskin, E. A. Signals, Systems, and Transforms. (4th ed.), NJ: Prentice Hall. (2008).

3.                Buck, J.R., Daniel, M.M., Singer, A., Computer explorations in signals and systems using MATLAB. NJ: Prentice Hall (2002)

4.                HSU, H.P., Schaum’s Outlines, Signals and Systems, McGraw-Hill (1995)

5.                Haykin, S., Veen, B.V., Signals and Systems, (2nd ed.), John Wiley & Sons (2007)

 

Administrative Instructions + Online Teaching SOPs

§  According to institute policy, 80% attendance is mandatory to appear in the final examination.

§  In any case, there will be no retake of (scheduled/surprise) quizzes.

§  For queries, kindly follow the office hours to avoid any inconvenience.

Computer Usage
Students are encouraged to solve some assigned tasks using the available engineering software, such as MATLAB
Lecture Breakdown
WeekTopicsReading & Practice
1-2

Introduction to the Course

Course Vocabulary: Signal vs System, Continuous-Time vs Discrete-Time, Impulse vs Step, Transform, Time-Domain vs Frequency Domain, Response, Convolution.

Signal Basics I: Classifications of signals; continuous time and discrete time signals, analog and digital signals, real and complex signals, deterministic and random signals, even and odd signals, periodic and non-periodic signals, Size of a signal, energy and power signals.

Chapter B:

Self-Reading

Course Vocabulary

Lecture Slides

Chapter 1:

1.1, 1.3, 1.5

Practice:

Related examples and end-of-chapter problems

3

 

Signal Basics II (Continuous Time): Basic signal operations, Some common signal models: Unit step function, operations with a Unit step, unit impulse function and its sampling property.

Signal Basics III (Continuous Time): A quick revision of complex numbers and operations, sinusoidal signals, the complex sinusoid, the complex exponential.

Chapter 1:

1.2, 1.4

Practice:

Related examples and end-of-chapter problems

4System Basics: Definition, classification of systems; continuous and discrete time systems, system with memory and without memory, causal and non-causal systems, linear systems and non-linear systems, time invariant and time varying systems, linear time invariant systems, stable systems, feedback systems.

Chapter 1:

1.6, 1.7

Practice:

Related examples and end-of-chapter problems

5-6Discrete Time (DT) Signals and Systems: Definition, DT signal properties and operations, some common DT signal models, Response of a discrete time LTI system and the convolution sum; impulse response, step response, response with any arbitrary input signal. Properties of discrete time LTI systems; system with and without memory, causality, stability. Eigen functions of discrete time LTI systems.

Chapter 3:

3.1, 3.2, 3.3, 3.4, 3.5, 3.6, 3.7, 3.8, 3.9

Practice:

Related examples and end-of-chapter problems

7-8z-Transform and Discrete Time LTI Systems: Introduction, z-transforms; definition, the region of convergence (ROC), Poles and zeros, properties of ROC. z-transforms of some common sequences, properties of z-transform.  Computing inverse z-transform; partial fraction expansion. System Function

Chapter 5:

5.1, 5.2, 5.3, 5.8

Practice:

Related examples and end-of-chapter problems

9

Continuous Time Linear Time Invariant (CT-LTI) Systems: Response of a continuous time LTI system and the convolution integral; impulse response, step response, response with any arbitrary input signal.

Properties of CT-LTI Systems: Properties of continuous time LTI systems; system with and without memory, causality, stability. Eigen functions of continuous time LTI systems.

Chapter 2:

2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.4, 2.5

Practice:

Related examples and end-of-chapter problems

 Mid-Term Examination 
10-11

Laplace transform and CT-LTI Systems: Introduction, Laplace transforms; definition, the region of convergence (ROC), Poles and zeros, properties of ROC. Laplace transforms of some common signals, properties of Laplace transform.

Inverse Laplace transform: Computing inverse Laplace transform; Inversion formula, use of tables of Laplace transform pairs, partial fraction expansion. System Function.

Chapter 4:

4.1, 4.2, 4.3, 4.7, 4.11

Practice:

Related examples and end-of-chapter problems

12An Intuitive Introduction to Fourier Transform: Interpretation and elements of a Transform, need for the Transform Domain, some common Transform Pairs.Lecture Slides
13-14

The Fourier transform: Definition, Fourier transform pairs, Fourier spectra, convergence of Fourier transform, connection between Fourier, Laplace, and Z transforms, properties of Fourier transforms.

Fourier series representation of CT/DT periodic signals: Complex exponential Fourier series representation, trigonometric Fourier series representation, harmonic form Fourier series, Convergence of Fourier series, amplitude and phase spectra of periodic signal, power content of periodic signal. Properties of Fourier series and LTI Systems

Chapter 6:

6.1, 6.3

Chapter 7:

7.1, 7.2, 7.3, 7.4

Practice:

Related examples and end-of-chapter problems

15Selected applications of Fourier, Laplace, and Z Transforms:  Sampling, Filtering, Communication and Control System.Lecture Slides
16Final Examination 

 

ES 332L Signals and Systems Lab

A toggle box content area

ES342 Modeling Processes

Syllabus/Course Outline

Modeling Processes (ES 342)

Fall Semester 2022

Pre-Requisite(s):       MT 201 – Differential Equations and Linear Algebra I

Instructor:                  Dr. Minhaj Zaheer

Office: Room G-11, FES

Email:  minhaj.zaheer@giki.edu.pk

Office Hours:             10:00-12:30. Also, by appointment.

Course Introduction

This is a first course in a series of courses designed for undergraduate students of engineering sciences specializing in “Modeling and Simulation” one of emerging stream offered by the Faculty of Engineering Sciences. The main purpose of the course is to make students proficient in modern techniques of mathematical modeling and in solving optimization problems encountered in real situations. Students are expected to have good background in calculus, linear algebra, and probability theory for this course. On completion of this course, the students will be trained enough to appreciate different modeling situations and apply the mathematical tools to model and solve similar problems in other areas.

Course Contents

·        Introduction to modeling; Types of models; Systems concept; Open and closed systems.

·        Review of mathematics of modeling.

·        Continuous models and classical optimization techniques.

·        Non-continuous and discrete models.

·        Linear Models and Linear Programming. Simplex algorithm.

·        Modeling of basic mechanical systems; translational and rotational systems, analysis of vibrations.

·        Modeling of basic electrical systems; series and parallel LRC circuits.

·        Modeling of experimental data and curve fitting to experimental data.

·        Interpolation and extrapolation.

·        Regression analysis and error analysis.

Text and Reference Books

Text/Reference Books:

·        A First Course in Mathematical Modeling by Frank R. Giordano, William P. Fox, Steven B. Horton, (5th Edition, Brooks/Cole USA, 2014).

·        Introduction to Operations Research by Frederick S. Hillier and Gerald J. Lieberman (10th Edition, McGraw-Hill Education USA, 2015).

·        A First Course in Differential Equations with Modeling Applications by Dennis G. Zill (11th edition, Brooks/Cole, USA, 2017)

·        Advanced Engineering Mathematics by Erwin Kreyszig (10th Edition, John Wiley & Sons, Inc. USA, 2011)

Overall Grading Policy

Assessment Items

Percentage

Announced Quizzes

15%

Assignments

10%

Project

15%

Midterm Exam

20%

Final Exam

40%

Mapping of CLOs to PLOs

Sr. No

Course Learning Outcomes

PLOs

Blooms Taxonomy

CLO-1

Be able to classify the variety of physical situations and their appropriate models.

PLO-1 (Knowledge)

C2 (Understanding)

CLO-2

Be able to formulate a given problem in terms of appropriate model and solve a modeled problem by applying the appropriate technique for optimal solution.

PLO-2 (Analysis)

C3 (Applying)

CLO-3

To be able to model the optimization problems from various inter disciplinary engineering problem.

PLO-3 (Design/Development of Solutions)

C3 (Applying)

CLO-4

To comply with the data protection and privacy policies related to the provided data.

PLO-8 (Ethics)

C6 (Responding)

CLO-5

Codify the knowledge of mathematical modeling on modeling project.

PLO-6 (The Engineer and Society)

A4(Organizing)

Administrative Instructions

·        According to institute policy, 80% attendance is mandatory to appear in the final examination.

·        Assignments must be submitted as per instructions given for each assignment.

·        In any case, there will be no retake of (scheduled/surprise) quizzes.

·        Mobile phones are not allowed during quizzes and exams.

Lecture Breakdown

Lecture 1:    Introduction to models and modeling.

Lecture 2:    Sytems; Static and dynamic systems; Open and closed systems.

Lecture 3:    Symmetry and proportionality; Dimensional analysis.

Lecture 4:    Functions and graphs in two and three dimensions; Symmetry of graphs; Scaling and shifting.

Lecture 5:    Rate of change and derivatives.

Lecture 6:    Differential equations.

Lecture 7:    Modeling using calculus Part I.

Lecture 8:    Modeling using calculus Part II.

Lecture 9:    Optimization using calculus Part I.

Lecture 10: Optimization using calculus Part II.

Lecture 11: Examples of discrete models.

Lecture 12: Difference equations for discrete models.

Lecture 13: Linear programming problems and models.

Lecture 14: Examples on formulation of LP models.

Lecture 15: Geometric solution for problems involving two decision variables.

Lecture 16: Algebraic solution and complexity issues.

Lecture 17: More examples of LP model formulation.

Lecture 18: Basic and non-basic variables, basis, standard and canonical forms.

Lecture 19: Conversion of LP model into standard and canonical forms.

Lecture 20: Simplex tableau and simplex algorithm.

Lecture 21: Discussion on simplex algorithm, examples.

Lecture 22: Problem of selecting initial basis for minimization problems, artificial variables.

Lecture 23: Big M method and two-phase method.

Lecture 24: Special cases of LP problems and their identification during simplex algorithm.

Lecture 25: Summing up simplex algorithm.

Lecture 26: Regression analysis and its type.

Lecture 27: Simple Linear regression

Lecture 28: Multiple linear regression.

Lecture 29: Error Analysis of results (loss function, Residuals, Overfittting, outliers, noisy data etc.)

Lecture 30: Polynomial Regression analysis.

Lecture 31: Linear VS Logistic Regression analysis.

Lecture 32: Support vector regression

Lecture 33: Review and problem session.

Lecture 34: Basic components of electrical systems.

Lecture 35: Series and parallel LRC circuits

Lecture 36: Modeling of basic engineering systems; Translational systems.

Lecture 37: Basic elements of mechanical systems; Springs and dampers.

Lecture 38: Rotational systems.

Lecture 39: Static moments and moments of inertia.

Lecture 40: Combination of systems.

Lecture 41: Analysis of vibrations.

Lecture 42: Examples of modeling a mechanical system.

Lecture 43: Similarity of electrical and mechanical systems.

Lecture 44: Resonance in electrical systems.

Lecture 45: Examples of modeling an electrical system.

     

 

ES 341 Numerical Analysis

Syllabus/Course Outline of ES 341 (Numerical Analysis)

Fall Semester 2023

Course Code         :         ES 341

Course Title          :         Numerical Analysis

Credit Hours          :         3+0

Instructors             :         Prof. Dr. Sirajul Haq, Sec: A & B, Office:  Room G-4, FES

Phone (Ext.)           :          2257,                                       Email: siraj@giki.edu.pk

Course Introduction

This course is required for engineering students. The pre-requisite is the Differential Equations and linear Algebra taught in third semester. The aim of this subject to develop the understanding of numerical techniques for solving linear and nonlinear equations and differential equations of real world engineering.

Course Contents

·       Mathematical Preliminaries and Errors Analysis

·       Iterative methods of root finding

·       Solution of system of linear equations

·       Interpolation and polynomial approximation

·       Numerical Differentiation and Integration

·       Numerical Solution of Ordinary Differential Equation

Mapping of CLOs and PLOs

S.No

CLOs

PLOs

Bloom Taxonomy

After the end of this course, students will be able to

CLO1

Apply different polynomial approximation methods

PLO1

C3

CLO2

find the roots of linear and nonlinear equations

PLO1

C3

CLO3

Use various numerical methods for differentiation, integration and solution of ordinary differential equations

PLO1

C3

CLO4

Write efficient, well-documented code and present numerical results in an informative way.

PLO1

C3

Direct Assessment Tools Based on CLOs

Assessment Tools

CLO-1

CLO-2

CLO-3

CLO-4

Quizzes

30%

20%

20%

10%

Assignments

20%

20%

20%

50%

Midterm Exam

30%

30%

30%

20%

Final Exam

20%

30%

30%

20%

 

Grading Policy

Assessment Items

Weightage

Assignments

5%

Announced Quizzes

20%

Midterm Exam

30%

Final Exam

45%

Text and Reference Books

Text Book:

Numerical Analysis (9th edition) by R. L. Burden and J. D. Fairs, Books/Cole

Reference Books:

  1. Numerical Analysis by D. Kincaid and W. Cheney
  2. Numerical Methods, for Computer Science, Engineering and Mathematics by John H. Mathew

Administrative Instruction

·       Student Attendance is expected to be 100%, and minimum 80% (mandatory) attendance that is required to sit in the final exams

·       Student must pay the attention for reading the text books chapter for course assessment

·       All the direct assessment tools i.e., Quizzes, Assignment, Midterms, Project and final Exams must be attempted. Failure to attempt in any of the assessment tools without any medical reasons may results to fail in that particular assessment. All quizzes would be taken together for all sections.

·       Students are advised to study the previous lecture before next class for better understanding.

·       Class participation is highly encouraged. It develops more interest. Students are also advised to spare some time for group discussion with their classmates to explore new ideas.

·       For any query please contact instructor during office time.

·       All quizzes/examinations will be closed book. No graphical calculators will be allowed.

·       There will be five announced quizzes. Out of these five, four best quiz results of each student will be counted for grading purpose.

·       Assignments must be submitted as per instructions mentioned in the assignments.

·       In any case, there will be no retake of scheduled/surprise quizzes.

Lecture Breakdown

Lecture 01

Introduction to Numerical Analysis, Review of Calculus

Lecture 02

Types of errors. Measuring size of errors, Round-off errors and floating point arithmetic. Chopping and rounding

Lecture 03

The Bisection Method and related theorems, Numerical Examples using Bisection Method

Lecture 04

Fixed point iterations and related theorems, Numerical Examples using Fixed point iterations

Lecture 05

The Newton and Secant Methods and their applications

Lecture 06

Error Analysis and Modified Newton’s Method with examples

Lecture 07

Aitken’s delta square & Steffensen’s Methods

Lecture 08

Multiple roots, Horner’s Method and Algorithms for Iterative Techniques

Lecture 09

Introduction to matrices and Linear System of Equations

Lecture 10

Gaussian Elimination with Backward Substitution and Gauss-Jordan Method, Pivoting Strategies, Partial and Scaled Partial Pivoting

Lecture 11

LU Factorization

Lecture 12

Interpolation and Lagrange Polynomial, Taylor Polynomial

Lecture 13

Newton’s Forward and Backward divided differences and Polynomials

Lecture 14

Newton’s Forward and Backward differences

Lecture 15

Centered divided difference and Polynomials

Lecture 16

Hermite interpolation

Lecture 17

Splines, Construction of Splines (Natural  and Clamped Splines)

Lecture 18

Applications of Splines, Algorithm for interpolation

Lecture 19

First order derivatives using two, three and five points

Lecture 20

Formulas for higher derivatives and Round-Off Instability

Lecture 21

Richardson’s Extrapolation

Lecture 22

Trapezoidal & Composite Trapezoidal rules rules of integration and examples

Lecture 23

Simpson’s Rule of integration and examples

Lecture 24

Composite Simpson’s Rule of integration and examples

Lecture 25

Romberg integration

Lecture 26

Algorithm for Numerical Differentiation and Integration

Lecture 27

Review of Ordinary Differential Equations, Initial and Boundary

Conditions, Euler’s Method for the Solution of well-posed initial-value Problem

Lecture 28

Taylor’s Method of Orders two and Four

Lecture 29

Modified Euler and Runge-Kutta Method of Order Four Methods

Lecture 30

Algorithm for Numerical Solution of Ordinary Differential Equations

          

Note:     This outline serves only as a rough guidance of the course. It may be changed or modified as and when deemed necessary by the instructor.

ES451 Instrumentation

Syllabus/Course Outline

Instrumentation (ES 451)

Fall Semester 2023

Pre-Requisite(s):       ES 211 Circuit Analysis I

Instructor:                  Dr. M. Omer Bin Saeed

                                    Email:   omer.saeed@giki.edu.pk

Office Hours:             10:30 AM – 12 PM (Thursday, Friday) OR By appointment.

Course Introduction

Precision measurements terminologies principles of different measurement techniques; instruments for measurement of electrical and non-electrical quantities; systems for signal processing and signal transmission; modern instrumentation techniques; static and dynamic responses of instrumentation and signal conditioning; data acquisition systems; principles of operation, construction and working of different analog and digital meters, Advanced Testing & Measuring instruments recording instruments, signal generators, Input and output transducers; types of bridges for measurement of resistance, inductance, and capacitance; power and energy meters; voltage/current measurements. The Programmable Logic Controllers (PLC), SCADA and communication are introduced. After learning the principles of developing PLC programs, examples of control systems are presented.

Course Contents

·        Introduction to electrical measurements and instrumentation, and their characteristics

·        Signal conditioning and sensor loading

·        Different types of sensors and circuits

·        PID control, relays and PLCs SCADA systems

Text and Reference Books

Textbooks:

·        Measurements and Instrumentation, 1st Edition, by U A Bakshi 

·        Modern Control Technology: Components and Systems, 3rd Ed. by Christopher Killian

Reference Books:

·        Fundamentals of Industrial Instrumentation and Process Control, by William C. Dunn, McGraw-Hill, 2005.

Mapping of CLOs to PLOs

Sr. No

Course Learning Outcomes

PLOs

Blooms Taxonomy

 

After completion of this course the student will be able to:

 

CLO-1

Apply knowledge of Measurements and Instrumentation, signal conditioning and systems to perform calculations of basic instrumentation and signal conditioning circuits.

PLO-1

(Engineering Knowledge)

C2 (Applying)

CLO-2

Analyze and design sensors/actuators for various applications.

PLO-2

(Problem analysis)

C3 (Applying)

 

CLO-3

Analyze sensors based PID control system, and design & implement PLC based control solutions.

PLO-3

(Design/Development of Solutions)

C4 (Analyzing)

CLO-4

Demonstrate basic knowledge of Communication, SCADA, and latest trends in sensing, controls, and actuations.

PLO-1

(Engineering Knowledge)

C2 (Applying)

CLO-5

Attend an industry-based workshop about instrumentation and SCADA and critically analyze the strong and weak points.

PLO-12

(Lifelong Learning)

A4 (Organization)

Grading Policy

Assessment Items

Percentage

Quizzes

15%

Assignments

10%

CEP

15%

Midterm Exam

20%

Final Exam

40%

Administrative Instructions

·        As per institute policy, 80% attendance is mandatory to appear in the final examination. No exceptions.

·        Assignments must be submitted on due date as per instructions given for each assignment.

·        In any case, there will be no retake of (scheduled/surprise) quizzes.

Lecture Breakdown

Week

Topics

CLO

1

Introduction to Electrical Measurements and Instrumentation.

1

2

Measurement system and its static, dynamics and random  characteristics

3

Signal Conditioning and sensor loading

4-8

Different types of sensors and their functionality

2

 

Mid-Term Examination

 

9

Galvanometer, Voltmeter, Ampere meter, power meter

2

10

Introduction to PID Control, relays and relay based logic implementation.

3

11-12

Introduction to PLCs and Ladder Diagrams design development

13-14

Industrial Communication, SCADA, Latest trends in instrumentation

4

15

Workshop

5

 

ES314 Microprocessor Interfacing

 

ES-314: Microprocessor Interfacing (3 Credit Hours)                                                              Fall-2023

Pre-Requisite: Computer Architecture (ES213)

Instructor:      Dr. Muhammad Sadiq

                         Office # G-16, FES, GIKI.

                         Email: muhammad.sadiq@giki.edu.pk

Course Description

This course provides basic knowledge necessary to understand the hardware operation and programming of PIC based commercial microcontrollers (RISC architecture). This course also emphasizes understanding the hardware architecture, memory organization, input/output interface, peripherals interfacing and software flow (assemblers, compilers, and debugging tools) of the microprocessors/microcontrollers. The course will also enable the students to have 1) working knowledge of a modern computer system architecture along with supporting devices 2) utilizing and programming of microcontrollers/microprocessors for any real-world application and 3) interface and control devices using microcontrollers/microprocessors.

Course Contents

  • Introduction to microcontrollers and microprocessors
  • PIC families of microcontrollers and their features and application areas
  • Registers and Modules in PIC18 microcontroller RISC based architecture description
  • Data and Program BUS, Memory Organization, and Addressing Techniques
  • Instruction format and types, Fields, and Instruction Set of PIC18
  • Instruction Cycle, Machine Cycle, and Pipelining
  • Assembly Language Programming of PIC18
  • I/O ports’ programming and arithmetic/logic functions
  • PIC18 Internal Peripherals (ADC, DAC, CCP, ECCP) Programming using Assembly and embedded C language

Mapping of CLOs & PLOs

CLO

Course Learning Outcomes

PLO

Blooms Taxonomy

 

CLO-1

Be able to explain a basic processor architecture and its components, ALSU, operations, and types of memory architecture; and understand registers and modules in PIC18 architecture, Memory organization, Addressing techniques, and Instruction format and structure.

PLO-1

C-2 (Comprehension)

CLO-2

Be able to develop codes for PIC18 microcontroller using the basic techniques of Assembly Language & Embedded C.

PLO-3

C-3 (Application)

CLO-3

Be able to design systems for real life applications using PIC18 internal peripherals and interfacing of external devices.

PLO-3

C-4 (Analysis)

Overall Grading Policy

Assessment Tools

Percentage

Scheduled + Surprise Quizzes

15%

Assignments

05%

Midterm Examination

30%

Final Examination

40%

Complex Engineering Problem

10%

Text and Reference Books

TEXTBOOKS:

·        PIC Microcontroller and Embedded Systems, M.A. Mazidi, R.D. McKinlay, (Prentice Hall).

·        PIC18 Family Detailed Reference Manual (Latest Edition)

·        PIC18F47K42 Datasheet

REFERENCE BOOKS:

·        PIC Microcontrollers Programming in BASIC, MikroElectronika

·        PIC Microcontrollers Programming in C, MikroElectronika

·        Programming dsPIC Microcontroller in C, MikroElectronika

Additional Resources

·        electricaltechnology.org/2020/05/types-of-microcontrollers.html

·        youtube.com/playlist?list=PLMmOAJ4LMgOJ1ATfP7k-ICV6zXPmAUqGU

·        www.allaboutcircuits.com/latest/digital-ics/processors/

·        www.allaboutcircuits.com/latest/embedded/microcontroller/

·        people.ece.cornell.edu/land/courses/ece4760/

General/Administrative Instructions

·        We will focus both on theory and practical applications and implementation of what we are learning.

·        There will be no compromise on discipline and attendance. 80% attendance is mandatory to appear in final.

·        There will be both announced and surprise quizzes. Both will have equal weightage.

·        The above table showing the grading policy can be updated any time during the course by the instructor.

·        Plagiarism and use of unfair means will lead to minimum course “F” and up to semester “F” grades.

·        Kindly take appointment via email before coming to office, unless it’s urgent.

Weekly Lecture Breakdown

Week No.

Topics to be covered

Week # 01

Introduction (Microprocessors, Microcontrollers, Microchip PIC controller families, features, and applications), Registers and Modules in PIC18 (RISC based architecture description)

Week # 02

Data and Program BUS, Memory Organization, and Addressing Techniques in PIC18 family.  Instruction format and types, Fields, and Instruction Set of PIC18.

Week # 03

Instruction Cycle, Machine Cycle, and Pipelining. Assembly Language Programming of PIC18 using the given instruction set, Structure of PORTs

Week # 04

I/O ports’ programming, Arithmetic/logic instructions, BCD numbers and display, DAW, Rotate

Week # 05

Loops using assembly and jump/branch instructions, subroutines, stack operation using call instructions, Time delay using loops and jumps

Week # 06

PIC programming in embedded C language, Mixed embedded C, and assembly programming

Week # 07

Interrupts, Interrupts Sources in PIC18, Interrupt Handling, Interrupt Vector Table, ISR.

Week # 08

Timers/Counters programming in PIC18

Week # 09

CCP/ECCP programming in PIC18. Internal PWM Modules Programming.

Week # 10

Internal ADC with Compute (ADCC) programming in PIC18

Week # 11

Motor Control: Relays, PWM, Steppers, Position Control

Week # 12

Serial protocols, serial communication using PIC18 USART, LCD Interfacing with PIC18

Week # 13

Other Peripherals of PIC18 including DAC, Comparator, CWG, NCO, CLC, etc.

Week # 14

Interfacing and programming of various sensors and actuators for real-life applications

Week # 15

Introduction to RISC-V Instruction Set Architecture

 

 

EE334 Introduction to Photonics

EE334 Introduction to Photonics (3 Credit Hours) – Fall 2023

Pre-Requisite: PH102 Electricity and Magnetism

Instructors: Dr. Usman Habib

 Office # G-26 FES, GIK Institute, Ext: 2290

Email: usman.habib@giki.edu.pk

Office Hours: 10:00  – 2:00 pm (Tuesdays and Wednesdays)

Course Introduction

The students are expected to learn the necessity as well as the basic science and engineering of photonics. The course enlarges on the wave-particle duality of light, electromagnetic wave theory, physical optics, geometrical optics, laser operation and optic fiber theory. At the end of the course, students are supposed to be knowledgeable on the theory of photonics and be able to study advanced courses and perform complex tasks in the field of optics and photonics.

Course Contents

·        Physical/Wave Optics:

Nature and properties of light, Electromagnetic waves

Propagation of light, Scattering, Reflection, Refraction, Fresnel equations, Boundary Conditions

Wave equations, superposition, coherence, interference, Interferometers

Diffraction, Fraunhofer Diffraction, Diffraction Grating

·        Geometric Optics

Image formation, Reflection/refraction from spherical mirrors/lenses

Prisms, Microscope, Camera, Telescope

Aberration, optics of the eye

·        Additional Topics:

Lasers operation, characteristics of laser beam, Mode lock lasers, Holography

Optical waveguides and fibers

Basics of fiber optic telecommunication, optical modulation and detection

Polarization, Birefringence, Optical activity, Electro-optic effect, LCD, Matrix treatment of Jones Vectors

 

Mapping of CLOs & PLOs

By the end of the course, the student will be able to:

CLOs

Course Learning Outcomes

PLOs

Blooms Taxonomy

CLO-1

Solve problems related to propagation, properties and behavior of light and its interaction with matter.

PLO-2

(Problem Analysis)

C3 (Apply)

CLO-2

Analyze the operation of different optical devices based on the theory of physical optics.

PLO-4

(Investigation)

C4 (Analyse)

CLO-3

Apply the principles of geometric optics to interpret several practical optical instruments.

PLO-3

( Design and development of solutions )

C3 (Apply)

CLO-4

Communicate effectively about the working principle and applications of photonic systems.

PLO 10 (Communication)

A2 (Respond)

CLO-5

·        Describe a relevant engineering application of photonics which can be useful for the society.

PLO6

 (The Engineer and Society)

A3 (Value)

CLOs Direct Assessment Mechanism

CLO #

Assessment Tools

CLO1

Quizzes, Assignments, Midterm Exam

CLO2

Quizzes, Assignments, Midterm Exam, Final Exam

CLO3

Quizzes, Assignments, Final Exam

CLO4

Report + Presentation

CLO5

Report + Viva

 

 

Overall Grading Policy

Assessment Tools

Percentage

Announced quizzes

15 %

Course Project (CEP)

15 %

Assignment

5 %

Midterm exam

25 %

Final exam

40 %

Text and Reference Books

Besides the handouts given in class, following reference materials shall be used:

Textbooks:

1.      Eugene Hecht, A. R. Ganesan, “Optics” 5th Edition. (Global Edition) (2017)

2.      Frank L. Pedrotti, Leno S. Pedrotti, “Introduction to Optics”, 3rd Edition, 2006

Reference books:

1.      Georg A. Reider “Photonics: An Introduction” 1st ed, Springer, 2016.

 

 

Administrative Instructions

§  According to institute policy, 80% attendance is mandatory to appear in the final examination.

§  For queries, kindly follow the office hours to avoid any inconvenience or email the instructor.

Computer Usage

Students are encouraged to solve some assigned tasks using the available engineering softwares, such as MATLAB, Optiwave Optisystem

 

 

Lecture Breakdown

Week

Topics

1

Introduction to photonics engineering (Textbook 1, Chapter 2)

Wave motion, Harmonic waves, Plane waves, Spherical waves, 3D wave equation, Phase velocity

2

Electromagnetic Waves (Textbook 1, Chapter 3)

Basics of EMT, Maxwell’s equations

3

Interaction of light with matter, Physical Optics (Textbook 1, Chapter 3)

Scattering, Reflection, Refraction, TIR, Fresnel equations

4

 

Superposition of Waves (Textbook 1, Chapter 7)

Standing waves, Beats, Fourier series, Fourier Integrals, Group velocity

5

Polarization (Textbook 1, Chapter 8)

Basics of plane and circular polarization, Birefringence, Optical Activity

6

Interference (Textbook 1, Chapter 9)

Conditions for interference, splitting interferometer

7

Diffraction (Textbook 1, Chapter 10)

Fraunhofer diffraction, Fresnel diffraction

8

Geometric Optics (Textbook 2, Chapter 2)

Huygens and Fermat principles, Imaging in optical systems,

9

Mid Exam

10

Geometric Optics continued (Textbook 2, Chapter 2)

Reflection and Refraction at a spherical surface, Lenses

11

Optical Instrumentation (Textbook 2, Chapter 3)

Aberration, Prisms, Camera,  Microscopes, Telescopes

12

Fiber Optics (Textbook 2, Chapter 10)

Propagation, Bandwidth, waveguide dispersion, Modes, Attenuation, Distortion

13

Optical Communication System (Textbook 2, Chapter 10)

WDM, Mach-Zehnder Interferometer, Optical modulation and detection, Performance analysis of a transmission system

14

Characteristics of Laser Beam (Textbook 2, Chapter 27)

Basic laser operation, laser safety, Gaussian beam, Divergence

 

15

Special topics in Photonics

·        Integrated optics, non-linear optics

·        Optical sensors, organic/inorganic/hybrid Photovoltaics, biophotonics, nanophotonics, and optical mems

 

 

Final Examination

 

ES333 Fluid Mechanics

 

ES 333 Fluid Mechanics

Pre-Requisite: ES-232: Thermodynamics

Instructor: Nayab (G-51, FES)

Email: nayab@giki.edu.pk

Course Introduction

This course covers the fundamentals of fluid mechanics with physical and analytical principles. The course develops an ability to identify, predict and evaluate the flow regime and hydrostatic forces in any engineering system. The principles of conservation of mass, momentum and energy are also included to analyze the differential flow of fluids. This understanding is subsequently carried over to mechanical, environmental and bio-medical systems.

 

Course Content

·        Introduction to Fluid Mechanics

·        Basic Properties of Fluids and Viscous Effects

·        Pressure and Fluid Statics

·        Hydrostatic Forces

·        Fluid Kinematics

·        Fluid Dynamics

·        Momentum Analysis of Flow Systems

·        Dimensional Analysis

·        Pipe Flows

·        Differential Analysis of Fluid Flow

 

Mapping of  Class Learning Outcome (CLOs) to  Program Learning Outcomes (PLOs)

S. No

CLOs

PLOs

Bloom Taxonomy

 

After completing this course the student will be able to…

 

CLO1

Apply basic principles of fluid mechanics to fluid statics and elementary fluid dynamics.

 

PLO2

C3

CLO2

Apply vector calculus to elementary problems in fluid kinematics.

PLO1

C3

CLO3

Perform dimensional analysis and apply similitude analysis between a model and a prototype. 

PLO2

C3

CLO4

Explore the role of fluid mechanics in the world around us.

PLO6

A2 (Responding)

CLO5

Explore the evolution of fluid mechanics as a discipline in conjunction with the development of human civilization.

PLO12

A3 (Valuing)

Grading Policy (Subject to Change)

Assessment Items

% Marks (Subject to the constraint of 100 Marks)

1.

Assignment

5%

2.

Quizzes

15%

3.

Mid-Term Exam

30% (After 8th week)

4.

Presentations/Project

10% (Before Final)

4.

Final Exams

40% (After 15th week)

Text and Reference Books

Text book:

Fundamentals of Fluid Mechanics, 7th Edition, Bruce R. Munson (2012)

 

Reference books:

1.      Fluid Mechanics, Fundamentals and Applications, 3rd Edition, Yunus. A.Cengel (2013)

2.      P. K. Kundu, I. M. Cohen David, & R. Dowling, “Fluid Mechanics”, 5th Edition, Elsevier, Academic Press, (2012)

Administrative Instruction

·        Student Attendance is expected to be 100%,  and minimum 80% (mandatory) attendance that is required to sit in the final exams

·        Student must pay the attention for reading the text books chapter for course assessment

·        All the direct assessment tools i.e., Quizzes, Assignment, Midterms, Project and final Exams must be attempted.  Failure to attempt in any of the assessment tools without any medical reasons may results to fail in that particular assessment.  All quizzes would be taken together for all sections.

·        Students are advised to study the previous lecture before next class for better understanding.

·        Class participation is highly encouraged. It develops more interest. Students are also advised to spare some time for group discussion with their classmates to explore new ideas.

·        Handouts and related notes will available on FES internet course portal.

·        For any query please contact instructor during office time.

Lecture Breakdown

Lecture#1

Introduction of the basis of Fluid Mechanics and its practical Applications

Lecture#2

Fluid behavior at static and dynamic conditions

Lecture#3

Governing laws to obey while solving fluid mechanics

Lecture#4

Parameters describing the fluid flow and introduction to basic fluid properties

Lecture#5

No slip condition, viscosity and its effects

Lecture#6

Types of fluids in terms of viscous effects, fluid flow analysis

Lecture#7

Reynolds’s no., compressibility of fluids

Lecture#8

Speed of sound and its relation with compressibility of fluids

Lecture#9

Surface tensions and capillary effects

Lecture#10

Pressure and its measurements

Lecture#11

Pressure at a point and its variation with depth

Lecture#12

Pressure in compressible and in-compressible fluids

Lecture#13

 Pressure measurements in a rigid body

Lecture#14

Pressure measurements (continue)

Lecture#15

Hydrostatic forces on submerged plan surfaces

Lecture#16

Hydrostatic forces on submerged curved surfaces

Lecture#17

Buoyancy and stability

Lecture#18

Control volume and system representations

Lecture#19

Eulerian and Lagrangian Description

Lecture#20

Eulerian and Lagrangian Description (continue)

Lecture#21

Steady effects of flow

Lecture#22

Unsteady effects of flow

Lecture#23

Material Derivative

Lecture#24

Types of pressure, Momentum Equations

Lecture#25

Newton’s second law, conservation of mass principle

Lecture#26

Bernoulli equation and its restrictions

Lecture#27

Reynolds Transport Theorem

Lecture#28

Reynolds Transport Theorem (continue)

Lecture#29

Continuity Equation, Energy Equation

Lecture#31

Energy Equation (continue)

Lecture#32

Comparison of Energy Equations with Bernoulli equation

Lecture#33

Irreversible fluid flows

Lecture#34

Dimensions and Units,

Lecture#35

Dimensional homogeneity, Experimental testing

Lecture#36

Modelling and similitude

Lecture#37

Modelling similitude (continue)

Lecture#38

Fluid element kinematics

Lecture#39

Conservation of linear momentum

Lecture#40

mass conservation

Lecture#41

In-viscid and viscous flow

Lecture#42

Navier Strokes Equation

Lecture#43

Application of Navier Stokes Equation on a fluid flow

Lecture#44

General Characteristics of pipe flows

Lecture#45

Fully developed laminar and Turbulent flow

       

 

ES474 Optoelectronics (till 2022)

 
 

ES474 Optoelectronics (3 CH), Spring 2023

Pre-Requisite:  ES376 Optical Engineering

Instructor:     Dr. Usman Habib (Room G-26, FES)

Email:             usman.habib@giki.edu.pk Phone: Ext 2290

Office Hours: Tuesdays and Thursdays (1230  ~ 1430 HRS)

Course Introduction

This module introduces the main components of modern day optoelectronic systems. This will include active devices for the generation, detection, amplification and modulation of optical signals and the key passive components in modern optical communication systems. The working principle for different types of optoelectronic devices such as optical modulators, LCDs, etc are studied in detail. The optoelectronic characteristics of different type of transmitters (LED, Lasers, Laser diodes, optical amplifiers) and receivers (pin photodiode, avalanche PD, heterojunction PD, solar cell) are analyzed.  This module also covers modeling and analysis of optoelectronic devices in a modern engineering software.

Course Content

·        Polarization

·        Light Propagation in an Anisotropic Medium

·        Liquid Crystal Displays

·        Electro-Optic Effects and Applications

·        Integrated Optics,  Optical sensors, Optical Analog Signal Processing

·        Acousto-optic effect and applications

·        Magneto-optic effect and applications

·        Nonlinear Optics and Second Harmonic Generation

·        Light-Emitting Diodes, Laser Diodes, Q-switched and mode-locked lasers

·        Photodetectors, Noise in Photodetectors

·        Photovoltaic Devices: Solar Cells

·        Optical Amplifiers

·        Organic Optoelectronics

 

Mapping of  Class Learning Outcome (CLOs) to  Program Learning Outcomes (PLOs)

S. No

 

CLOs

PLOs

Bloom Taxonomy

CLO1

Explain the fundamental concepts associated with the optical properties materials, devices and processes used to produce, detect, or control light.

PLO2

Problem Analysis

C2

Understanding

CLO2

Analyze the device architecture, characteristics, performance and parameters of optoelectronic devices

PLO 4

Investigation

C4

Analyzing

CLO3

Model and compare the performance of optoelectronic phenomena, devices and systems using modern simulation tools

PLO5

Modern Tool Usage

C4

Analyzing

CLO4

·        Appraise the latest research work in optoelectronics by attending seminars and workshops, and relate your understanding to state-of-the-art

PLO 12: Lifelong Learning

A3 Valuing

CLO5

Investigate the role of optoelectronic devices in environment friendly applications and specify the organic optoelectronics to achieve a sustainable future

PLO 7

Environment and Sustainability

A4 Organization

 

Grading Policy (Subject to change upon the discretion of the instructors)

Assessment Item

% Marks

 

1.

Assignment

4 %

2.

Technical Report (1 and 2)

2 %

3.

Quizzes

12 %

4.

CEP (Viva and Presentation)

12 %

5.

Mid-Term Exam

30 % (After 8th week)

6.

Final Exams

40 % (After 15th week)

 

Text and Reference Books

Text book:

1.      S. O. Kasap, “Optoelectronics and Photonics: Principles and Practices,” 2nd Edition, Pearson, NJ, USA, 2013.

2.      Adrian Kitai, “Principles of Solar Cells, LEDs and Diodes: The role of the PN junction”, John Wiley, 2011.

Reference books:

1.      B. E. A. Saleh and M. C. Teich, “Fundamentals of Photonics”, John Wiley, 2nd ed. 2007.

2.      J-M. Liu, “Photonic Devices”, Cambridge University Press, 2009.

3.      Khare, R. P., ed. Fiber optics and optoelectronics. Oxford University Press, USA, 2004.

4.      Clifford Pollock, “Optoelectronics, Irwin, 1995.

5.      Wilson and Hawkes, “Optoelectronics”, Prentice Hall, 2nd ed.1995.

Administrative Instruction

·        Student Attendance is expected to be 100%, and minimum 80% (mandatory) attendance that is required to sit in the final exams

·        Student must pay the attention for reading the text books chapter for course assessment

·        All the direct assessment tools i.e., Quizzes, Assignment, Midterms, Project and final Exams must be attempted.  Failure to attempt in any of the assessment tools without any medical reasons may results to fail in that particular assessment.  All quizzes would be taken together for all sections.

·        Students are advised to study the previous lecture before next class for better understanding.

·        Class participation is highly encouraged. It develops more interest. Students are also advised to spare some time for group discussion with their classmates to explore new ideas.

·        Handouts and related notes will available on FES internet course portal.

·        For any query please contact instructor during office time.

 

Lecture Breakdown

Lecture#1

Optoelectronics: An Overview

Lecture#2

Polarization of Light

Lecture#3

Malus’s Law

Lecture#4

Birefringence

Lecture#5

Birefringent Optical Devices

Lecture#6

Optical Activity and Circular Birefringence

Lecture#7-9

Liquid Crystal Displays

Lecture#10-12

Electro-Optic Effects

Lecture#13

Phase-Shift Modulation

Lecture#14

Longitudinal  Electro-Optic Modulator

Lecture#15

Transverse  Electro-Optic Modulator

Lecture#16

Integrated Optics: An Introduction 

Lecture#17

Waveguides and Integrated Optic Phase Shifter

Lecture#17

Integrated Optic Phase Shifter

Lecture#18

Integrated Mach-Zehnder Modulators, Coupled Waveguide Modulators and  Modulated Directional Coupler

Lecture#18

Coupled Waveguide Modulators

Lecture#18

Modulated Directional Coupler

Lecture#19

Acousto-Optic Modulators and Photoelastic Effect

Lecture#20

Acousto-Optic Modulation Regime,  Raman-Nath Regime, Bragg Regime

Lecture#21

Frequency Shift,  Analog and Digital AO Modulators,  SAW Based Waveguide AO Modulator

Lecture#22

Faraday Rotation and Optical Isolators

Lecture#23

Nonlinear Optics and  Second Harmonic Generation (SHG)

Lecture#23

Second Harmonic Generation (SHG)

Lecture#24

Second Harmonic Generation (SHG)

The Photonic View

Lecture#25

Quick review of  topics from Semiconductor Physics such as Energy Bands, Intrinsic and Extrinsic Material, pn Junctions and Direct and Indirect Bandgaps (also covered in ES 475)

Lecture#26

LED Principles, Materials and Structures, LED Efficiencies and Luminous Flux (also covered in ES 475)

Lecture#27

Principle of the Laser Diode, Heterostructure Laser Diodes, Quantum Well Devices, Elementary Laser Diode Characteristics

Lecture#28

The Laser Diode Equation,  Laser Diode Equation, Optical Gain Curve, Threshold, and Transparency Conditions

Lecture#29

Single Frequency Semiconductor Lasers (Distributed Bragg Reflector LDs, Distributed Feedback LDs)

Lecture#30

Principle of the pn Junction Photodiode, Shockley–Ramo Theorem and External Photocurrent, Absorption Coefficient and Photodetector Materials

Lecture#31

Quantum Efficiency and Responsivity, The pin Photodiode, Avalanche Photodiode Principles and Device Structures, Heterojunction Photodiodes

Lecture#32

Schottky Junction Photodetector, Phototransistors, Photoconductive Detectors and Photoconductive Gain, Basic Photodiode Circuits

Lecture#33

Noise in Photodetectors

Lecture#34

Noise in Photodetectors

Lecture#35

Photovoltaic Devices: Solar Cells,  Basic Principles

Lecture#36

Operating Current and Voltage and Fill Factor, Equivalent Circuit of a Solar Cell, Solar Cell Structures and Efficiencies.

Lecture#37

Q-switched and mode-locked lasers

Lecture#38

Optical MEMs

Lecture#39

  EDFAs

Lecture#40

Raman Amplifiers, Semiconductor Amplifiers

Lecture#41

Organic Optoelectronics: An Overview

Lecture#42

Organic Semiconductors, Level Structure of Organic Semiconductors

Lecture#43

UV-Vis Spectroscopy of Organic Semiconductors

Lecture#44

Organic Optoelectronic Devices: OLEDs, PLEDs, LDs

Lecture#45

Organic Optoelectronic Devices: Organic Solar Cells

       

 

ES465 Semiconductor Devices and Applications

ES465 Semiconductor Devices and Applications (3 CHs)

Pre-Requisite: Semiconductor Materials and Devices (ES-462)

Instructor: Dr. Muhammad Usman

Office # G-1, FES, GIK Institute, Ext. 2279

                    Email: m.usman@giki.edu.pk

                    Office Hours: 10:00 a.m. ~ 12:00 p.m.

Course Introduction

This course is organized to bring students with a background in freshmen physics to a level of understanding which will allow them to understand the basics and working of semiconductor devices and their applications in the specialized fields. The first half of the course deals with the  basics and working of semiconductor devices. The second half of the course deals with the applications of semiconductor devices. At the end of the course, students are supposed to be knowledgeable on the  semiconductor devices and their applications and may implement them in their future academic as well as industrial professions.

Course Contents

1.       Introduction to semiconductor devices and their physics

2.       Applications of various semiconductor devices

3.       Modeling and simulation of semiconductor devices

4.       Impacts of semiconductor devices on humans and environment swabi

5.       Recent trends and innovations in the semiconductor industry

Mapping of CLOs and PLOs

Sr. No

Course Learning Outcomes

PLOs

Blooms Taxonomy

CLO-1

Analyze the characteristics (such as physical, electrical, thermal, and optical) of various semiconductor devices.

PLO-2

Problem Analysis

Cognitive Level 4 (Analyzing)

CLO-2

Describe the applications of various semiconductor devices.

PLO-1

Engineering Knowledge

Cognitive Level 2 (Understanding)

CLO-3

Design semiconductor devices using modern engineering tools.

PLO-5

Modern Tool Usage

Cognitive Level 5 (Creating)

CLO-4

Discuss the impacts of semiconductor devices on human environment.

PLO-7

Environment and Sustainability

Cognitive Level 2 (Understanding)

CLO-5

Attend seminars/talks (physical, online, recorded) related to semiconductor devices and applications. Critically analyze their strong and weak points.

PLO-12

Lifelong Learning

Affective Level-2 (Responding)

Overall Grading Policy

Assessment Items

Percentage

Quizzes

15%

Assignments

5%

Midterm Exam

30%

Final Exam

40%

Project

10%

CLOs Direct Assessment Mechanism

CLO #

Assessment Tools

CLO1

Quizzes, Assignments, Midterm Exam, Final Exam

CLO2

Quizzes, Assignments, Midterm Exam, Final Exam

CLO3

Project, Viva, Presentation

CLO4

Assignments,  Midterm Exam, Final Exam

CLO5

Assignments

 

 

Text and Reference Books

Textbook(s):

  • Semiconductor Physics and Devices (Basic Principles), 4th Edition, by Donald A. Naemen (2012)

Reference book(s):

·        S. O. Kasap, Principles of Electronic Materials and Devices – Third Edition – (2008)

·        Solid State Electronic Devices, 7th Edition, by Ben G. Streetman and Sanjay Kumar, Prentice Hall (2018)

Supporting Tools for Course Delivery

Tools:

  • MS Teams, Turnitin, Nanohub.org Virtual Tool, COMSOL, MS Excel

Administrative Instruction

§  According to institute policy, 80% attendance is mandatory to appear in the final examination.

§  Assignments must be submitted as per instructions mentioned in the assignments.

§  Student must pay attention on reading the textbooks for course assessments rather than relying solely on the lecture slides.

§  In any case, there will be no retake of (scheduled/surprise) quizzes.

§  For queries, kindly follow the office hours to avoid any inconvenience.

Lecture Breakdown

Week 1

·        Introduction to Course

·        Introduction to Semiconductor Devices

Week 2

·        Introduction to pn junctions and pn junction diodes

·        Operation of pn junction diode

Week 3

·        Applications of pn junction diode

Week 4

·        Introduction to Metal Semiconductor and Semiconductor Heterojunctions

·        Schottky barrier diodes

Week 5

·        Applications of  Metal Semiconductor and Semiconductor Heterojunctions

Week 6

·        Introduction to Bipolar Junction Transistors

·        Operation of Bipolar Junction Transistors

Week 7

·        Applications of Bipolar Junction Transistors

Week 8

·        Introduction to Metal Oxide Semiconductor Field Effect Transistors (MOSFETs)

·        Operation of MOSFET

Week 9

·        Applications of MOSFETs

Week 10

·        Optical Absorption

·        Recombination, Generation

Week 11

·        Introduction to Optoelectronic Devices

·        Light-emitting diodes, Laser Diodes

Week 12

·        Solar Cells

·        Applications of Optoelectronic Devices

Week 13

·        Introduction to Semiconductor Microwave & Power Devices

Week 14

·        Applications of Semiconductor Microwave & Power Devices

Week 15

·        Miscellaneous

The above outlines serve only as a rough guideline of the course contents and may be changed as and when deemed necessary by the instructor. The instructor is at a liberty to best distribute number of lectures to cover the entire course

 

 

ES376 Optical Engineering

ES376 Optical Engineering (3 CH)

Pre-Requisite:ES371

Instructor: Prof. Dr. Muhammad Hassan Sayyad

Office # G-11 FES, GIK Institute, Ext. 2279

               Email: sayyad@giki.edu.pk

               Office Hours:      10:00  ~ 11:00 a.m.

Course Introduction

This course introduces students to the theory of optical engineering. The students are expected to learn the necessity as well as the basic physics of optical engineering. The course enlarges on the geometrical optics, wave-particle duality of light, electromagnetic wave theory and quantum behavior of the light. At the end of the course, students are supposed to be knowledgeable on the theory of optical engineering and may implement them in their future academic as well as industrial professions.

Course Contents

1.       Optical beams (Textbook sections 1.1-1.4)

2.       Total internal reflection (Textbook sections 1.5)

3.       Fresnel’s Formulae for amplitude coefficients (Textbook sections 1.6A)

4.       Reflected and transmitted energy (Textbook sections 1.6B)

5.       Polarization by reflection (Textbook sections 1.6B)

6.       Optical resonators (Textbook section 1.7)

7.       Principles of interference (Textbook section 1.10)

8.       Principles of diffraction (Textbook section 1.12)

9.       Geometrical optics and wave optics

10.    Fermat’s Principles

11.    Laser dynamics and advanced topics (Textbook sections 4.1-4.8)

12.    Principles of operation and applications of lasers

 

 

Mapping of CLOs and PLOs

Sr. No

Course Learning Outcomes

PLOs

Blooms Taxonomy

CLO1

Describe and explain the generation and propagation of light and its interaction with matter

PLO1

( Engineering Knowledge)

C1, C2

(Knowledge, Comprehension)

CLO2

Solve the optical engineering problems numerically

PLO1

( Engineering Knowledge)

C3 (Application)

CLO3

Compare and illustrate optical engineering theories and techniques

PLO2

( Problem Analysis)

C4

(Analysis)

CLO4

Describe a relevant engineering application of optical engineering which can be useful for the Pakistani society.

PLO6

 The Engineer and Society

C3

(Application)

CLO5

Active participation on the part of the student. Formally present the results of an investigation/project related to Optical Engineering Applications

PLO10

Communication

C5

(Evaluating)

 

 

 

Overall Grading Policy

Assessment Items

Percentage

Announced Quizzes

15%

Assignments

5%

Project

10%

Midterm Exam

30%

Final Exam

40%

 

Text and Reference Books

Text books:

  • S. O. Kasap “Optoelectronics and Photonics: Principles and Practices,” 2nd Edition, Pearson, NJ, USA (2013)

Reference books:

·        Frank L. Pedrotti, Leno S. Pedrotti, “Introduction to Optics” (2007)

·        Ronald G. Driggers, “Encyclopedia of Optical Engineering” (2003)

·        Bruce H. Walker, “Optical Engineering Fundamentals” (1998)

·        Allen Nussbaum, Richard A. Phillips, “Contemporary Optics for Scientists and Engineers” (1976)

Administrative Instruction

§  According to institute policy, 80% attendance is mandatory to appear in the final examination.

§  Short of attendance students must not bother the instructor at the end of the semester.

§  Assignments must be submitted as per instructions.

§  Late submission of assignments will not be entertained

§  Student must pay attention on reading the recommended course text books rather than relying only on the lecture slides

§  In any case, there will be no retake of (scheduled/surprise) quizzes.

§  Regularly check your official email for important announcements.

§  For queries, kindly follow the office hours in order to avoid any inconvenience.

Lecture Breakdown

§  Lectures 01-03: Optical beams

§  Lectures 04-06: Total internal reflection

§  Lectures 07-09: Fresnel’s Formulae for amplitude coefficients

§  Lectures 10-12: Reflected and transmitted energy Polarization by reflection

§  Lectures 13-15: Optical resonators

§  Lectures 16- 20: Simulation, modeling and demonstration of optical engineering principles, phenomena, devices and systems

§  Lectures 21-22: Fermat’s Principles,  Principles of interference and  diffraction

§  Lectures 23-24: Multiple interference and optical resonators

§  Lectures 25-39 Laser dynamics

§  Lectures 40-45 Principles of operation and applications of lasers

 

The above outlines serve only as a rough guideline of the course contents and may be changed as and when deemed necessary by the instructor. The Instructor is at a liberty to best distribute number of lectures to cover the entire course

 

ES466 Microelectronics Manufacturing Engineering

 
 

 

ES466-Microelectronics Manufacturing EngineeringSpring 2023

Pre-Requisite(s): None

Instructor:  Engr. Muhammad Saqib

Email: muhammd.saqib@giki.edu.pk

Office G 64, FES Building

Office hours:  Mondays [10.30 – 11.30 am and 12.30 – 1.30pm]; Wednesdays [10.30 – 11.30am and 12.30 – 1.30pm]; Thursdays [10.30am – 12.30pm]

Website: https://giki.edu.pk/personnel/muhammad-saqib/

Course Introduction

The microelectronics manufacturing engineering course cover major aspects of microelectronics manufacturing technology, such as wafer processing, oxidation, diffusion, ion implantation, thin films deposition, chemical vapor deposition, lithography, metallization, plasma etching, etc. This course emphasizes design and fabrication of silicon-based devices and integrated circuits, learn how to utilize most of the semiconductor processing equipment. Also, the processes involved in microlithography masking and pattering by UV lithography technique. Positive and negative resist systems as well as processes for IC application will also be studied. Advanced topics will include projection-system design, resist-materials characterization, process optimization, and electron-beam lithography patterning.

Course Content

•             Designing of electronic/micro devices and integrated circuits.

•             Manufacturing process of electronic devices.

•             Electronic devices processing equipment’s and their manufacturing limit.

•             Microlithography masking and pattering by UV lithography technique.

•             Electron beam lithography: Design and patterning. 

•             Positive and negative resist systems and resist-materials characterization.

•             Oxidation, diffusion, ion implantation, metallization and plasma etching processes.

Mapping of  Class Learning Outcome (CLOs) to  Program Learning Outcomes (PLOs)

S. No

CLOS

PLOs

Bloom Taxonomy

CLO1

Describe the fundamentals and techniques of thin film processing for microelectronics manufacturing engineering

PLO1 (Engineering Knowledge)

C2 (Comprehension)

CLO2

Discuss and analyze different types of lithography and etching processes for microelectronics manufacturing engineering

PLO1 (Engineering Knowledge)

C2 (Comprehension)

CLO3

Design, simulate and analyze micro/solid state devices to meet a set of geometric and processing parameters

PLO3 (Design and development of solutions)

C5 (Synthesis)

CLO4

Formulate the solutions as an Individual and Team to meet the specifications of the design project.

PLO9 (Individual and teamwork)

C5 (Synthesis)

CLO5

Explain the results and findings of the proposed design solution in the design project effectively.

PLO10 (Communication)

C5 (Synthesis)

Grading Policy

Assessment Items

% Marks

1.

Quizzes

10%

2.

Assignments

5%

3.

Mid-Term Exam

30%

4.

CEP

15%

5.

Final Exams

40%

Text and Reference Books

Text Books:

·        Fundamentals of Semiconductor Fabrication, by Gray S. May, Simon S. Sze, John Wiley Publishers, 2004.

·        Fundamentals of Semiconductor Manufacturing and Process Control, by Gray S. May, Costas J. Spanos, John Wiley Publishers, 2006.

Reference books:

·        Semiconductor Integrated Circuits processing technology by W.R. Runyan and K. E. Bean

·        The Science and Engineering of Microelectronic Fabrication by Stephen A. Campbell, Second Edition.

·        Foundations of MEMS by Chang Liu, Second EDITION

·        Silicon VLSI Technology, Fundamentals, Practice and Modeling by James D. Plummer, Michael D. Deal, Peter B. Griffin.

·        Introduction to Semiconductor Materials and Devices by M.S.Tyagi

·        Introduction to Semiconductor Manufacturing Technology by Hong Xiao, SPIE Press, 2012

 

Administrative Instruction

·       Student Attendance is expected to be 100%, and minimum 80% (mandatory) attendance that is required to sit in the final exams.

·       Student must pay the attention for reading the text books chapter for course assessment rather than lecture slides.

·        All the direct assessment tools i.e., Quizzes, Assignment, Midterm and final Exams must be attempted.  Failure to attempt in any of the assessment tools without any medical reasons may results to fail in that particular assessment.

·        In any case, there will be no retake of (scheduled/surprise) quizzes

·        For queries, kindly follow the office hours in order to avoid any inconvenience. However I may be contacted anytime by getting appointment using email or telephonically

Lecture Breakdown

Week 1

Course overview and introduction of microelectronics manufacturing engineering.

·        Generic IC manufacturing Systems

Types and Goals of Manufacturing Systems

Week 2

Basic structure of electronic devices.

·        P-N Junction Fabrication

·        Making of EGS, Czechrolski method

Float Zone method, basic steps of wafer fabrication

Week 3

Device manufacturing process

·        Oxidation of Silicon, Principle Uses of Silicon Dioxide

·        Thermal Oxidation of Silicon

Oxidant Sources

Week 4

·        Chemical Vapor Deposition of Silicon Dioxide

·        PECVD of Silicon Dioxide

Sputtering and Evaporation

Week 5

Thin-film Processing

·        Epitaxial Growth of Silicon

·        Growth Steps in VPE

·        Equilibrium Growth/deposition Modes

Critical Thickness and Stresses in thin Films

Week 6

·        Liquid Phase Epitaxy

·        Molecular Beam Epitaxy

Vacuum Pumps

Week 7

Doping in thin films

·        Diffusion

Ion Implantation

Week 8

Microlithography masking and pattering by UV lithography technique

Week 9

·        Mask designing

·        pattern transfer

exposure tools for device structures

Week 10

Electron beam lithography

Design and patterning

Week 11

Advanced Lithography Techniques

Week 12

Positive and negative resist systems,

resist-materials and their characterization

Week 13

Etching

·        wet chemical and dry etching

·        reactive plasma etching

·        silicon etching

·        silicon oxide etching

aluminum etching and their characterization

Week 14

Device processing equipment’s and utilization.

Week 15

Designing of electronic/micro devices.

      

 

INSTRUCTIONS/SUGGESTIONS FOR STUDENTS:

  • Class participation will develop more interest and understanding about the course.
  • Solving assignment will help in surprise & announced quizzes. 
  • Group discussion explores new ideas and always recommended.
  • Students must bring their textbook or reading materials in every lecture.  
  • Questions are always welcomed, and students can visit office in office hours or email their queries.

 

__________________________

Signature

 

MT203 Complex Variables and Transforms

Syllabus/Course Outlines 

MT 203 (Complex Variables and Transforms)

Spring Semester 2023

Course Code         :         MT 203

Course Title          :         Complex Variable and Transforms

Credit Hours          :         3+0

Instructors             :         Prof. Dr. Sirajul Haq,   Sec: A & B        Office:  Room G-4, FES

Phone (Ext.)           :          2257,                                              Email: siraj@giki.edu.pk

              

 

                                            

Course Introduction

This course is required for engineering students. The pre-requisite is the Calculus II taught in second semester. The aim of this subject to develop the understanding of Complex variables, Laplace and Fourier Transforms for the solutions of many mathematical problems including ordinary and partial differential equations.  .

Course Contents

·       Complex variables

·       Laplace Transforms and its applications in ordinary differential equations

·       Fourier Transforms and its applications

·       Special functions

·       Use of transforms in partial differential equations

Mapping of CLOs and PLOs

S.No

CLOs

PLOs

Bloom Taxonomy

After the end of this course, students will be able to

CLO1

To solve basic problems related to complex numbers and functions

PLO1

C3

CLO2

Apply various techniques to evaluate integrals of complex functions on different paths

PLO1

C3

CLO3

Use Laplace Transform for the solution of ordinary and integral equations

PLO1

C3

CLO4

Apply Fourier Transform for the solution of differential equations

PLO1

C3

Grading Policy

Assessment Items

Weightage

Assignments

5%

Announced Quizzes

20%

Midterm Exam

30%

Final Exam

45%

 

Text Book:

Advanced Engineering Mathematics (10th edition) by Erwin Kreyszig, John Wiley

Reference Books:

  1. Complex variables and applications by J.W. Brown and R.V. Churchill

Administrative Instruction

·       Student Attendance is expected to be 100%, and minimum 80% (mandatory) attendance that is required to sit in the final exams

·       Student must pay the attention for reading the text books chapter for course assessment

·       All the direct assessment tools i.e., Quizzes, Assignment, Midterms, Project and final Exams must be attempted. Failure to attempt in any of the assessment tools without any medical reasons may results to fail in that particular assessment. All quizzes would be taken together for all sections.

·       Students are advised to study the previous lecture before next class for better understanding.

·       Class participation is highly encouraged. It develops more interest. Students are also advised to spare some time for group discussion with their classmates to explore new ideas.

·       For any query please contact instructor during office time.

·       All quizzes/examinations will be closed book. No graphical calculators will be allowed.

·       There will be five announced quizzes. Out of these five, four best quiz results of each student will be counted for grading purpose.

·       Assignments must be submitted as per instructions mentioned in the assignments.

·       In any case, there will be no retake of scheduled/surprise quizzes.

Lecture Breakdown

Lecture 01

Complex Analysis: Complex numbers and functions, , ,

Lecture 02

Limit and derivative, Analytic function, Cauchy-Remain equations

Lecture 03

Line integrals in the complex plane

Lecture 04

Continued

Lecture 05

Taylor and Laurent series

Lecture 06

Continued

Lecture 07

Residues, Evaluation of real integrals using Residue theorem.

Lecture 08

Continued

Lecture 09

Laplace Transforms: Laplace Transforms and Inverse Transforms

Lecture 10

Linearity, transforms of derivatives and integrals, shifting theorem

Lecture 11

Continued

Lecture 12

Unit Step function, Differentiation and Integration of transform, Convolution

Lecture 13

Continued

Lecture 14

Continued

Lecture 15

Partial fractions, Applications of Laplace transform to the solution of differential and integral equations

Lecture 16

Continued

Lecture 17

Continued

Lecture 18

Continued

Lecture 19

Fourier Series, Integrals and Transforms: Fourier series, Coefficients, Orthogonality, function of period, Complex Fourier series,

Lecture 20

Continued

Lecture 21

Continued

Lecture 22

Continued

Lecture 23

Fourier integrals, Fourier cosine and sine integrals,

Lecture 24

Continued

Lecture 25

Fourier cosine and sine transforms,

Lecture 26

Continued

Lecture 27

Continued

Lecture 28

Complex form of Fourier transform, Convolution

Lecture 29

Continued

Lecture 30

Continued

Lecture 31

Continued

Lecture 32

Special functions

Lecture 33

Bessel’s equations, Bessel’s functions of the second kind

Lecture 34

Modified Bessel functions

Lecture 35

Sturm Liouville problem, Orthogonality of Bessel function

Lecture 36

Continued

Lecture 37

Partial differential equations

Lecture 38

Use of Fourier-Bessel series

Lecture 39

Solution of heat equation using Fourier Transform

Lecture 40

Solutions of heat and wave equations using Laplace transform

Lecture 41

Continued

Lecture 42

Solution of heat and wave equations using Fourier Transform

Lecture 43

Continued

Lecture 44

Legendre differential equation and its solution

Lecture 45

Continued

      

Note:     This outline serves only as a rough guidance of the course. It may be changed or modified as and when deemed necessary by the instructor.

ES205 Advance Linear Algebra

ES-205: Advance Linear Algebra                                                                                                Fall 2023

Pre-Requisite:   MT-201

Instructor: Dr. Babar Zaman

Email: babar.zaman@giki.edu.pk Office: G-22, FES

Phone: 2244

Consultation hours: During office hours, or by appointment for long consultation

 

Course Introduction

We are passing through the ‘information age’ in which information extraction and processing plays a vital role in many disciplines from engineering to computer science, economics, biology etc. Vectors and matrices provide a useful framework for the storage and processing of information. The language of vectors and matrices is known as Linear Algebra in mathematics. This course aims to introduce the basic notions and concepts related to vectors and matrices and the operations that are performed on them which allows them to be applied to real-world problems. Application examples will also be discussed to demonstrate the importance of linear algebra in different fields such as engineering, computer science and economics. The essential goal of the course is thus to make the students comfortable with the language of matrices and vectors so that not only they are familiar with the important terms and notions related to vectors and matrices, but that they are also able to apply important operations on vectors and matrices to different type of problems including physical and

real-world problems.

 

Course Contents

1.     Linear equations in Linear Algebra – Systems of Linear Equations, Row Reduction and Echelon Forms, Vector and Matrix Equations, Solution Sets of Linear Systems, Applications of Linear, Linear Independence, Introduction to Linear Transformations

2.     Matrix Algebra – Matrix inverse, Characterization of invertible matrices, Partitioned matrices, and Matrix factorization

3.     Determinants– Properties of determinants, Cramer’s rule, and linear transformations

4.     Vector Spaces– Vector spaces and subspaces, null space, linearly independent sets, Bases, and linear transformations

5.     Eigenvalues and Eigenvectors -Eigenvalues and eigenvectors, characteristic equation, diagonalization

6.     Orthogonality and least squares – Inner product and orthogonality, Gram Schmidt process, Least-squares Problems

7.     Symmetric matrices and quadratic forms (if time permits) – Diagonalization of symmetric

matrices, quadratic forms, singular value decomposition

 

CLOs and PLOs

Sr.

No.

Course Learning Outcomes

PLOs

Blooms

Taxonomy

CLO1

Be able to solve systems of linear equations, perform important matrix algebra operations

and demonstrate associated understanding.

PLO1 (Engineering Knowledge)

C3 (Application)

CLO2

Be able to demonstrate understanding of vector spaces and solve problems related to vector spaces, including eigenspace and its associated parameters.

PLO1 (Engineering Knowledge)

C3 (Application)

CLO3

Be able to demonstrate understanding of advanced linear algebra concepts, such as Gram-Schmidt, Singular Value Decomposition etc., and solve associated problems

PLO1 (Engineering Knowledge)

C3 (Application)

CLO4

Analyze and solve applied engineering problem requiring tools from advanced linear algebra.

PLO 4 (Investigation)

C5 (Evaluating)

CLO5

Efficiently work in a team to investigate and

solve problems related to applied linear algebra.

PLO 9 (Individual and Teamwork)

A2 (Respond)

 

Tentative CLOs Assessment Mechanism

 

 

 

CLO1

CLO2

CLO3

CLO4

CLO5

Quizzes

1-2 Quiz

1-2 Quizzes

1-2 Quizzes

 

 

Midterm Exam

1 Mid Qs.

1 Mid Qs.

1 Mid Qs..

 

 

Final Exam

1-2 Final Qs.

1-2 Final Qs.

1-2 Final Qs.

 

 

Project

 

 

 

1 Project on a Complex Engineering

Problem (CEP)

1 Project Report Section

 

Grading policy

Assessment items

Weightage

5*Announced Quizzes

15%

5*Assignments

10%

Project on Complex Engineering Problem

10%

Midterm exam

25%

 

Final exam

40%

 

 

 

Text and Reference Books

Text book:

·       Linear Algebra and its Applications – David C. Lay, Steven R. Lay, Judi J. McDonald (6th Edition

– Global Edition, 2022, Pearson, USA).

Reference book:

·       Elementary Linear Algebra with Applications – Howard Anton, Chris Rorres (11th Edition 2013, Wiley, USA).

·       • Linear Algebra and Its Applications – Gilbert Strang (4th Edition 2005, USA).

 

Administrative Instructions

·       Preparing for the announced quizzes (based on assignments) is the best way to do well in this course, as they will be interspersed throughout the semester, and you will have ample amount to prepare IF you plan nicely. Anyone who has done the assignments himself/herself is expected to do well in quizzes, midterm and final exam.

·       All the lectures as well as the assessments including, assignments, quizzes, midterm, and final exam) will be made from the book topics covered in the lectures. Hence, make sure that you read the book topics thoroughly and NOT rely ONLY on the slides, which are made only to assist in lecturing.

·       Quizzes/Assignments due dates will be announced well in advance. The dates will not be changed, hence make sure to plan your other commitments accordingly.

·       All course material (lecture slides, assignments, marks, announcements etc.) will be communicated to students via CMS portal. It is the responsibility of the students to regularly check the portal for important information and material.

·       Please do not make the class noisy. As 3rd year students, it is expected of you to act maturely in the classes. You are allowed to go out of the class quietly if there is something urgent that needs your attention.

·        80% attendance is mandatory to be allowed to sit in the final examination as per institute’s

policy. No relaxations will be allowed

 
  

 

ES212 Logic Design

ES-212: (Digital) Logic Design                                                                                                     Fall 2023

Pre-Requisite:   None

Courses for which this course is a Pre-requisite: Computer Architecture (ES-213) Instructor: Dr. Asad Mahmood

Email: asad.mahmood@giki.edu.pk Office: G-9, FES Faculty Area Phone: 2285

Consultation hours: During office hours, or by appointment for long consultation

 

Course Introduction

We are passing through the era of ‘digital’ revolution. From small devices such as watches, calculators to more complex devices, like a microprocessor in a Personal Computer, all of these devices are based on digital data. These devices require representation of input and output data in a digital/binary format, and then processing (addition, multiplication etc.) of this data. The course of digital logic designs aims to provide an understanding of basic concepts related to digital data representation and processing. Concepts such as binary representation of numbers, basic operations (e.g. addition, multiplication etc.) on the binary numbers and fundamental building blocks of a digital system which are known as ‘logic gates’, will be introduced in the first half of this course. The latter half of the course will deal with the construction of more advanced devices such as counters, digital data storage devices etc. The concepts learned in this course will act as fundamentals for higher level courses in digital system design such as Computer Architecture (ES-213) and Microprocessor Interfacing (ES-314)

 

Course Contents

1.     Introduction to the Analog and Digital System

2.     Number System, Operations and Codes

3.     Logic gates

4.     Boolean Algebra and Logic Simplification

5.     Analysis and Functions of Combinational Logic

6.     Latches and Flip-Flops

7.     Shift Registers

8.     Counters

9.     Programmable Logic (if time permits)

 

CLOs and PLOs

Sr.

No.

Course Learning Outcomes

PLOs

Blooms

Taxonomy

CLO1

Represent and process (e.g. add, multiply etc.) data in different data representation formats (e.g. binary, hexadecimal etc.) and perform interconversions between them.

PLO1 (Engineering Knowledge)

C3 (Application)

CLO2

Analyze and design combinational logic circuits

PLO3

(Design/Development of Solutions)

C4 (Analyzing)

CLO3

Analyze and design sequential logic circuits

PLO3

(Design/Development of Solutions)

C4 (Analyzing)

CLO4

Communicate effectively via a written report on the design project given in logic design lab

PLO10

(Communication)

C4 (Analyzing)

CLO5

Discuss the relevance of the logic design project with the concerned UN’s sustainable

development goals (SDGs)

PLO 7 (Environment and Sustainability)

C2

(Understanding)

 

Tentative CLOs Assessment Mechanism

 

 

 

CLO1

CLO2

CLO3

CLO4

CLO5

Quizzes

1-2 Quiz

1-2 Quizzes

1-2 Quizzes

 

 

Midterm Exam

1 Mid Qs.

1 Mid Qs.

.

 

 

Final Exam

 

1-2 Final Qs.

2-4 Final Qs.

 

 

Project

 

 

 

1 Project Report

1 Project

Report Section

 

Grading policy

Assessment items

Weightage

5*Announced Quizzes

15%

5*Assignments

10%

Lab Project Report

10%

Midterm exam

25%

Final exam

40%

 

Text and Reference Books

Text book:

·       Thomas L. Floyd, “Digital Fundamentals”, 11th Global Edition, 2015, Pearson Prentice Hall

Reference book:

·       M. M. Mano, C. R. Kime and T. Martin, “Logic and Computer Design Fundamental”, 5th Edition, 2015, Pearson Prentice Hall.

 

Administrative Instructions

·       Preparing for the announced quizzes (based on assignments) is the best way to do well in this course, as they will be interspersed throughout the semester, and you will have ample amount to prepare IF you plan nicely. Most of the questions in the Quizzes, Midterm and Final examination will be made like those given in the assignments., and thus anyone who has done the assignments himself/herself is expected to do well in these assessments.

·       All the lectures as well as the assessments including, assignments, quizzes, midterm, and final exam) will be made from the book topics covered in the lectures. Hence, make sure that you read the book topics thoroughly and NOT rely ONLY on the slides, which are made only to assist in lecturing.

·       Quizzes/Assignments due dates will be announced well in advance. The dates will not be changed, hence make sure to plan your other commitments accordingly.

·       All course material (lecture slides, assignments, marks, announcements etc.) will be communicated to students via CMS portal. It is the responsibility of the students to regularly check the portal for important information and material.

·       Please do not make the class noisy. As 2nd year students, it is expected of you to act maturely in the classes. You are allowed to go out of the class quietly if there is something urgent that needs your attention.

·        80% attendance is mandatory to be allowed to sit in the final examination as per institute’s

policy. No relaxations will be allowed

 

Tentative Lectures Breakdown:

·       Week 1 Lectures            Introduction to the course, introductory concepts and number system (Chapter 1)

·       Week 2 Lectures            Binary arithmetic and binary codes (Chapter 2)

·       Week 3 Lectures            Binary arithmetic and binary codes (Chapter 2)

·       Week 4 Lectures            Logic Gates (Chapter 3)

·       Week 5 Lectures            Boolean algebra and Boolean analysis of logic circuits (Chapter 4)

·       Week 6 lectures            Boolean algebra and Boolean analysis of logic circuits (Chapter 4)

       Week 7 lectures  Combinational Logic Circuits (Chapter 5)

       Week 8 lectures  Functions of combinational logic (Chapter 6)

 
 

MID-TERM

·       Week 9 lectures        Functions of combinational logic (Chapter 6) Week 10 lectures      Latches, Flip-flops and Timers (Chapter 7)

·       Week 11 lectures      Latches, Flip-flops and Timers (Chapter 7)

·       Week 12 lectures      Shift Registers (Chapter 8)

·       Week 13 lectures      Shift Registers (Chapter 8)

·       Week 14 lectures      Counters (Chapter 9)

·       Week 15 lectures      Counters (Chapter 9)

 

 

ES232 Thermodynamics

ES232 Engineering Thermodynamics

Pre-Requisite:

Instructor: Misbah Shaheen Email: ges2302@giki.edu.pk Office: G- 30

Office hours: 10:00 am to 12:30 pm

Course Introduction

An understanding of thermal physics is crucial to almost all modern physics (from astrophysics, atmospheric physics, laser physics, condensed matter physics and information theory) and to the important technological challenges which face us in this century.

 

It includes the fundamentals of classical thermodynamics (which was founded largely in the nineteenth century and motivated by a desire to understand the conversion of heat into work using engines) and also statistical mechanics (which was founded by Boltzmann and Gibbs, and is concerned with the statistical behaviour of the underlying microstates of the system); but the traditional focus of thermodynamics on steam engines seems remote and largely irrelevant to a twenty-first century student.

 

This course provides an introduction to the key concepts in thermal physics, fleshed out with plenty of modern examples. The relevant mathematical principles, particularly concerning probability and statistics, will be introduced with in the first two weeks.

Course Content

·        Mathematical preliminaries (Combinatorics and Probability)

·        Macrostates and microstates

·        Kinetic theory of gases (Maxwell Boltzmann distribution)

·        Zeroth and First Law of Thermodynamics

·        Second law of thermodynamics

·        Entropy

·        Maxwell relations

·        Introductory statistical mechanics

Mapping of Class Learning Outcome (CLOs) to Program Learning Outcomes (PLOs)

S. No

CLOS

PLOs

Bloom Taxonomy

 

During this course the students will…

 

 

CLO1

Apply the ensemble approach to the kinetic theory of gases, finding the velocity and speed distributions and mean free

path in the process.

PLO1

C3 (Applying)

CLO2

Apply the laws of Thermodynamics to classical (i.e. non-

quantum mechanical) systems.

PLO1

C3 (Applying)

CLO3

Use statistical methods to classical (i.e. non-quantum

mechanical) systems.

PLO1

C3 (Applying)

CLO4

Explore the contribution of thermodynamics to societal

issues of historic or contemporary significance

PLO6

A2 (Responding)

CLO5

Explore the contribution of thermodynamics to problems of

wider philosophical significance

PLO12

A3 (Valuing)

Grading Policy (Subject to change)

 

Assessment Items

% Marks (Subject to the constraint of 100 marks)

1.

Quizzes (Surprised +Announced)

20 %

2.

Mid-Term Exam

30%

3.

Assignments

4%

4.

Final Exams

40%

5.

Viva/Group Discussions/Presentations

6% (For CLOs 3 and 4)

Text and Reference Books

Text book:

–        Blundell Stephen and Katherine M Blundell. 2010. Concepts in Thermal Physics. 2nd ed. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

 

Reference books:

–        Use the ‘Further Reading’ sections at the end of each chapter.

–        For a different approach towards Thermodynamics

o   Fundamentals of Thermodynamics by Claus Borhnakke and Richard E. Sonntag (7th Edition), 2008

o   Thermodynamics: An Engineering Approach by Yunus A. Çengel and Boles (8th Edition), 2014

Administrative Instruction

·        Student Attendance is expected to be 100%, and minimum 80% (mandatory) attendance that is required to sit in the final exams

·        Student must pay attention for reading the text books chapter for course assessment rather than lecture slides

·        All the direct assessment tools i.e., Assignments, Quizzes, Midterms, and Final Exams must be attempted. Failure to attempt in any of the assessment tools without any medical reasons may results to fail in that particular assessment.

·        For any query please contact with me during office time or via email.

Lecture Breakdown

Lecture#1

Mathematical Preliminaries: Permutations and Combinations

Lecture#2

Mathematical Preliminaries: Permutations and Combinations

Lecture#3

Mathematical Preliminaries: Probability (Continuous and Discrete)

Lecture#4

Mathematical Preliminaries: Probability (Mean and Variance)

Lecture#5

Heat Capacity

Lecture#6

Temperature and the Boltzmann factor: Thermal equilibrium

Lecture#7

The microstates and macrostates

Lecture#8

A statistical definition of temperature

Lecture#9

The Maxwell–Boltzmann distribution

Lecture#10

The velocity and speed distribution

Lecture#11

mean free path, mean collision time, collision cross-section

Lecture#12

Energy and the First Law of Thermodynamics

Lecture#13

Energy and the First Law of Thermodynamics

Lecture#14

Energy and the First Law of Thermodynamics

Lecture#15

Isothermal and adiabatic processes, Reversibility

Lecture#16

Isothermal and adiabatic expansion of an ideal gas

    

Lecture#17

Heat engines and the second law

Lecture#18

The second law of thermodynamics

Lecture#19

The Carnot engine

Lecture#20

Carnot’s theorem

Lecture#21

Equivalence of Clausius’ and Kelvin’s statements

Lecture#22

Examples of heat engines

Lecture#23

Entropy, Irreversible change

Lecture#24

The first law revisited, Joule expansion

Lecture#25

The statistical basis for entropy

Lecture#26

The entropy of mixing, thermodynamic potentials

Lecture#27

Internal energy, U; Enthalpy, H;

Lecture#28

Helmholtz function, F; Gibbs function, G

Lecture#29

Constraints

Lecture#31

Electric and magnetic dipoles

Lecture#32

Paramagnetism

Lecture#33

The third law

Lecture#34

Different statements of the third law

Lecture#34

Consequences of the third law

Lecture#36

Equipartition of energy

Lecture#37

Equipartition theorem

Lecture#38

Applications

Lecture#39

Assumptions made

Lecture#40

Brownian motion

Lecture#41

The partition function

Lecture#42

Writing down the partition function

Lecture#43

Obtaining the functions of state

Lecture#44

Combining partition functions

Lecture#45

Statistical mechanics of an ideal gas

 

ES304 Linear Algebra II

ES-304: Linear Algebra II                                          Fall 2023

Pre-Requisite:   MT-201

Courses for which this course is a Pre-requisite: n/a Instructor: Dr. Asad Mahmood

Email: asad.mahmood@giki.edu.pk Office: G-9, FES Faculty Area Phone: 2285

Consultation hours: During office hours, or by appointment for long consultation

 

Course Introduction

 

We are passing through the ‘information age’ in which information extraction and processing plays a vital role in many disciplines from engineering to computer science, economics, biology etc. Vectors and matrices provide a useful framework for the storage and processing of information. The language of vectors and matrices is known as Linear Algebra in mathematics. This course aims to introduce the basic notions and concepts related to vectors and matrices and the operations that are performed on them which allows them to be applied to real-world problems. Application examples will also be

discussed to demonstrate the importance of linear algebra in different fields such as engineering, computer science and economics.

 

Course Contents

1.     Linear equations in Linear Algebra – Review (Systems of Linear Equations, Row Reduction and Echelon Forms, Vector and Matrix Equations, Solution Sets of Linear Systems), Applications of Linear Systems, Linear Independence, Introduction to Linear Transformations

2.     Matrix Algebra – Review (Matrix inverse), Characterization of invertible matrices, Partitioned matrices, and Matrix factorization

3.     Determinants– Properties of determinants (Review)

4.     Vector Spaces– Vector spaces and subspaces, null space, linearly independent sets, Bases, and linear transformations

5.     Eigenvalues and Eigenvectors – Review (Eigenvalues and eigenvectors), characteristic equation, diagonalization

6.     Orthogonality and least squares – Inner product and orthogonality, Gram Schmidt process, Least-squares Problems

7.     Symmetric matrices and quadratic forms (if time permits) – Diagonalization of symmetric matrices, quadratic forms, singular value decomposition

 

CLOs and PLOs

Sr.

No.

Course Learning Outcomes

PLOs

Blooms

Taxonomy

CLO1

Be able to solve systems of linear equations, perform important matrix algebra operations and demonstrate associated understanding.

PLO1 (Engineering Knowledge)

C3 (Application)

CLO2

Be able to demonstrate understanding of vector spaces and solve problems related to vector spaces, including eigenspace and its

associated parameters.

PLO1 (Engineering Knowledge)

C3 (Application)

CLO3

Be able to demonstrate understanding of advanced linear algebra concepts, such as Gram-Schmidt, Least-Squares, Singular Value

Decomposition etc., and solve associated problems

PLO1 (Engineering Knowledge)

C3 (Application)

CLO4

Analyze and solve applied engineering problem requiring tools from advanced linear algebra.

PLO 4 (Investigation)

C5 (Evaluating)

CLO5

Efficiently work in a team to investigate and solve problems related to applied linear

algebra.

PLO 9 (Individual and Teamwork)

A2 (Respond)

 

Tentative CLOs Assessment Mechanism

 

 

 

CLO1

CLO2

CLO3

CLO4

CLO5

Quizzes

2-3 Quizzes

2 Quizzes

1-2 Quizzes

 

 

Midterm Exam

2-3 Mid Qs.

1 Mid Qs.

 

 

 

Final Exam

 

1-2 Final Qs.

2-3 Final Qs.

 

 

Project

 

 

 

1 Project on a Complex Engineering

Problem (CEP)

1 Project Report Section

 

Grading policy

Assessment items

Weightage

5*Announced Quizzes

15%

5*Assignments

10%

Project on Complex Engineering Problem

+Teamwork

10%

Midterm exam

25%

Final exam

40%

 

Text and Reference Books

Text book:

·       Linear Algebra and its Applications – David C. Lay, Steven R. Lay, Judi J. McDonald (6th Edition

– Global Edition, 2022, Pearson, USA).

Reference book:

·       Elementary Linear Algebra with Applications – Howard Anton, Chris Rorres (11th Edition 2013, Wiley, USA).

·       • Linear Algebra and Its Applications – Gilbert Strang (4th Edition 2005, USA).

 

Administrative Instructions

·       Preparing for the announced quizzes (based on assignments) is the best way to do well in this course, as they will be interspersed throughout the semester, and you will have ample amount to prepare IF you plan nicely. Anyone who has done the assignments himself/herself is expected to do well in quizzes, midterm and final exam.

·       All the lectures as well as the assessments including, assignments, quizzes, midterm, and final exam) will be made from the book topics covered in the lectures. Hence, make sure that you read the book topics thoroughly and NOT rely ONLY on the slides, which are made only to assist in lecturing.

·       Quizzes/Assignments due dates will be announced well in advance. The dates will not be changed, hence make sure to plan your other commitments accordingly.

·       All course material (lecture slides, assignments, marks, announcements etc.) will be communicated to students via CMS portal. It is the responsibility of the students to regularly check the portal for important information and material.

·       Please do not make the class noisy. As 3rd year students, it is expected of you to act maturely in the classes. You are allowed to go out of the class quietly if there is something urgent that needs your attention.

·        80% attendance is mandatory to be allowed to sit in the final examination as per institute’s

policy. No relaxations will be allowed

 

Tentative Lectures Breakdown:

·       Week 1 Lectures            Linear equations in Linear Algebra (Chapter 1)

·       Week 2 Lectures            Linear equations in Linear Algebra (Chapter 1)

·       Week 3 Lectures            Matrix Algebra (Chapter 2)

·       Week 4 Lectures            Matrix Algebra (Chapter 2)

·       Week 5 Lectures            Vector Spaces (Chapter 4)

·       Week 6 lectures            Vector Spaces (Chapter 4)

·       Week 7 lectures            Vector Spaces (Chapter 4)

·       Week 8 lectures            Eigenvalues and Eigenvectors (Chapter 5)

 

             MID-TERM                                

  • Week 9 lectures Eigenvalues and Eigenvectors (Chapter 5)
  • Week 10 lectures Orthogonality and Least Squares (Chapter 6)
  • Week 11 lectures Orthogonality and Least Squares (Chapter 6)
  • Week 12 lectures Symmetric Matrices and Quadratic Forms (Chapter 7)
  • Week 13 lectures Symmetric Matrices and Quadratic Forms (Chapter 7)
  • Week 14 lectures Application Examples
  • Week 15 lectures Revision

 

ES445 Computer Simulation Methods

Syllabus/Course Outline Computer Simulation Methods (ES 445)

Fall Semester 2023

 

Pre-Requisite(s): ES 202, ES 342

Instructor:            Shahid Ahmad

Office: Room G-8, FES Phone: 2220

Email: Shahid.Ahmad@giki.edu.pk

 

Office Hours:       Posted outside office door of course instructor. Also by appointment.

Course Introduction

This course is a required course for all students specializing in “Modeling and Simulation”, one of emerging stream offered by the Faculty of Engineering Sciences. The main purpose of the course is to make students proficient in techniques and skills of executing the theoretical physical models on a computer and analyzing the execution output. Constructing models of a given physical situation appropriate for computer simulation is a part of the course. There is an emphasis on providing mathematical skills with a working knowledge and understanding of basic concepts involved. This course covers both “Discrete-Event” and “Continuous System” simulation at introductory level, preparing students for advanced studies in these fields. It is hoped that, on completion of this course, the students will be trained enough to apply simulation technique for analyzing concrete physical situations and making correct decisions based on simulated results.

Course Contents

 

·        Introduction to Simulations: Simulation and modeling; Types of Simulation; Uses of Simulations.

·        Simulation of Stochastic Systems: Review of basic probability; Standard probability distributions; Random variates and their uses in discrete event simulation.

·        Discrete-Event System Simulations: Basic concepts; Simulation of random numbers and random variates; Simulation of problems of discrete nature; Analysis of output data.

·        Simulation of Queuing Systems and Inventory Systems: Queuing systems and their simulation; M/M/1 and M/M/2 systems; Newsvendor’s problem and simulation of basic inventory systems.

·        Continuous System Simulations: Simulation Schemes; Typical inputs; Simulation of basic electrical and mechanical systems; Transfer function and their simulation; Simulation of combination of system; Implicit function generation.

Text and Reference Books

 

Textbooks:

·        Discrete-Event System Simulation by Jerry Banks et al. 5th Edition 2009, Pearson USA.

·        Continuous System Simulation by David Murray-Smith. 1st Edition 2013, Springer USA.

Reference Books:

·        Discrete-Event Simulation: A First Course by Lawrence M. Leemis et al. 1st Edition 2006, Pearson USA.

·        Continuous System Simulation, by François E. Cellier. 1st Edition 2006, Springer USA.

·        Simulation by Sheldon M. Ross, 5th Edition 2012, Academic Press USA)

 

Mapping of CLOs to PLOs

Sr. No

Course Learning Outcomes

PLOs

Bloom’s Taxonomy Level

 

After completing the course, the student will be

able to

 

 

CLO-1

Use Simulation Methodology to analyze different

engineering systems.

PLO-2

C3 (Applying)

CLO-2

Perform Discrete-Event Simulation and evaluate

output data for optimal decision making.

PLO-3

C3 (Applying)

 

CLO-3

Create Continuous System Simulation Schemes

and use them for optimal analysis and design of engineering systems.

 

PLO-3

 

C3 (Applying)

 

CLO-4

Investigate real world problems employing computer simulation methods and suggest

improvements.

 

PLO-4

 

C5 (Evaluate)

CLO-5

Formally present the results of an investigation related to a simulation problem/method

PLO-10

A3

Direct Assessment Tools for CLOs

CLOs

Assessment Tools

CLO-1

Quizzes, Assignments, Midterm Exam, Final Exam, Projects

CLO-2

Quizzes, Assignments, Midterm Exam, Final Exam

CLO-3

Quizzes, Assignments, Midterm Exam, Final Exam

CLO-4

Quizzes, Assignments, Midterm Exam, Final Exam

CLO-5

CEP Report and Presentation

Overall Grading Policy

Assessment Items

Percentage

Announced Quizzes

20%

Assignments, CEP

10%

Midterm Exam

30%

Final Exam

40%

Administrative Instructions

 

·        According to institute policy, 80% attendance is mandatory to appear in the final examination.

·        All quizzes/examinations will be closed book.

·        There will be no retake of scheduled/surprise quizzes.

·        Students may work on home assignments in collaboration with each other, but they must submit their own work; no copying from others. Violation of this will adversely affect their quiz/exam results.

Computer Usage

 

This is a computer intensive course. Students are expected to have knowledge of basic computer programming techniques. They must be proficient in using the available software such as EXCEL, SIMULINK, and MATLAB.

Lecture Breakdown

Lecture

Topic

01

Introduction to Computer Simulations.

02

Simulation and Modeling.

03

Types of Simulation. Uses of Simulations.

      

 

04

Discrete-Event Simulations, Introduction.

05

Revision of Probability Theory.

06

Discrete Probability Distributions.

07

Continuous Probability Distributions.

08

Mean and Variance of Probability Distributions.

09

Generation of Random Numbers.

10

Generation of Random Variates I.

11

Generation of Random Variates II.

12

Generation of Random Variates III.

13

Discrete Event Simulation using Random Variates.

14

Monte Carlo Method.

15

Analysis of Output Data.

16

Variance Reduction Techniques.

17

Verification and Validation of Simulation Models I.

18

Verification and Validation of Simulation Models II.

19

Comparison of Alternate Designs.

20

Simulation Software.

21

Stochastic Models.

22

Queuing Models.

23

M/M/1 and M/M/k Models.

24

Simulation of Basic Queuing Models.

25

Inventory Models.

26

News Vendor Models.

27

Basic Financial Analysis.

28

Summing Up Discrete Event Simulations.

29

Continuous System Simulations.

30

Types of Systems. Open and Closed Systems.

31

Feedback in a Closed System.

32

Basic Simulation Terminology used in Continuous System Simulations.

33

Simulation Schemes.

34

Typical Inputs and Outputs.

35

Simulation of Basic Electrical Systems.

36

Simulation of Basic Mechanical Systems.

37

Implicit Function Generation Technique.

38

Transfer Functions.

39

Transfer Functions in Nested Form.

40

Transfer Functions in Partition Form.

41

Transfer Functions in Factored Form.

42

Simulation of System of ODEs.

43

Combining Simulation Blocks.

44

Simulation of Combination of Systems.

45

Summary and Review.

Note: This outline and lecture distribution serves only as rough guidance of the course. It may be changed or modified as and when deemed necessary by the instructor. The instructor is at liberty to best distribute the number of lectures and/or change the sequence of topics to cover the entire course.

ES462 Semiconductor Materials and Devices

ES462 Semiconductor Materials and Devices (3 Credit Hours) – Fall 2023

Pre-Requisite: Electricity and Magnetism (PH-102) Instructor: Engr. Dr. Muhammad Usman

Office # G-1 FES, GIK Institute, Email: m.usman@giki.edu.pk

Office Hours: 2.30 pm – 4.00 pm.

Course Introduction

This course is organized to bring students with a background in freshmen physics to a level of understanding which will allow them to understand basics of semiconductor materials and devices.

Course Contents

From Prospectus (2014-2021)

Semiconductors and their preparation for engineering use, crystal structure, mobility, and electrical conductivity, measuring electrical conductivity, measuring electrical parameters of semiconductors, energy bands in solids, homogeneous semiconductor in thermodynamic equilibrium, amorphous semiconductors, the pn junction, semiconductors in optoelectronics, the photovoltaic

effect, semiconductor devices, superconducting devices, power semiconductor devices and devices of the future.

Mapping of CLOs & PLOs

 

 

By the end of the course, the student will be able to:

 

CLOs

Course Learning Outcomes

PLOs

Taxonomy

 

CLO-1

Analyze the parameters (e.g., physical, electrical, thermal, etc.) properties associated with the semiconductor materials.

PLO-2

(Problem Analysis)

Cognitive Level-4 (Analyzing)

 

CLO-2

Analyze the properties (e.g., physical, electrical, thermal,

etc.) associated with the semiconductor devices.

PLO-2

(Problem Analysis)

Cognitive Level-4

(Analyzing)

 

CLO-3

Construct semiconductor material characteristics (electronic, thermal, physical etc.) and/or design semiconductor devices using modern engineering tools.

PLO-5

(Modern Tool Usage)

Cognitive Level-6 (Creating)

 

CLO-4

Review the impact of semiconductor materials and devices on humans and environment.

PLO-7

(Environment and Sustainability)

Cognitive Level-2 (Understanding)

 

CLO-5

Communicate the results of the application and analysis of the        material/electronic/physical        properties                                            of

semiconductor materials and/or devices.

PLO-10

(Communication)

Affective Domain Level-2 (Responding)

CLOs Direct Assessment Mechanism

 

 

CLO #

Assessment Tools

 

CLO1

Assignments, Quizzes, Midterm Exam, Final Exam

CLO2

Assignments, Quizzes, Midterm Exam, Final Exam

CLO3

Assignments, Complex Engineering Problem (Project)

CLO4

Assignments, Mid, Final

CLO5

Complex Engineering Problem (Project)

Overall Grading Policy

 

 

Assessment Tools

Percentage

 

Quizzes (Surprise + Scheduled) + Viva

15%

Assignments

5%

Midterm Examination

30%

Course Project (Complex Engineering Problem)

10%

Final Examination

40%

           

 

Text and Reference Books

Textbook:

1.         Solid State Electronic Devices, 7th Edition, by Ben G. Streetman and Sanjay Kumar, Prentice Hall (2018)

2.         Semiconductor Physics and Devices (Basic Principles), 4th Edition, by Donald A. Naemen (2011)

Administrative Instructions + Online Teaching SOPs

▪        According to institute policy, 80% attendance is mandatory to appear in the final examination.

▪        Assignments must be submitted as per instructions mentioned in the assignments.

▪        Student must pay the attention for reading the textbooks chapter for course assessment rather than lecture slides

▪        In any case, there will be no retake of (scheduled/surprise) quizzes.

▪        For queries, kindly follow the office hours to avoid any inconvenience.

Online Teaching Related Instructions

●       During mandatory closure of HEIs, course will be shifted to online mode using MS Teams, where lectures are given in synchronous mode according to announced schedule.

●       Lectures are also recorded for later viewing in case any students have connectivity issues.

●       Quizzes and assignments are administered through the MS Teams assignment system.

Supporting Tools for Course Delivery

MS Teams, Turnitin, Nanohub.org Virtual Tool, COMSOL

 

Lecture Breakdown

 

 

Week 1

·        Introduction to Semiconductor Materials:

·        Basic concepts, Types of Semiconductor Effects of temperature on Semiconductor

 

 

Week 2

·        Introduction to Crystallography:

·        Crystal lattices, Periodic structure, Cubic lattices and its types, Planes and directions, Atomic Packing Factor

 

Week 3

·        Discussion on the Growth Techniques:

·        Growth from the melt (Czochralski Method) and Bridgeman technique

·        Liquid phase epitaxy (LPE), Vapor phase epitaxy (VPE) and Molecular beam epitaxy

 

Week 4

·        Computational Analysis of Semiconductor Properties on Semiconductor

·        Fermi-Diract Probability Function, Energy Bands and Charge Carriers in Semiconductors, Carrier Recombination

·        Effective mass and the concept of a hole, and the density of state in energy bands

 

Week 5

·        Homogeneous Semiconductors in Thermodynamic Equilibrium

·        Intrinsic and extrinsic concentration, Position of intrinsic and extrinsic fermi levels, Compensated semiconductor and Degenerate and non-degenerate Semiconductors

 

Week 6

·        Mobility and Electrical Conductivity in Metals and Semiconductors:

·        Drift and Diffusion Phenomena, scattering mechanism, average drift velocity, mobility and conductivity, Mobility by the Hall effect

·        Haynes-Shockley experiment, diffusion constant and the lifetime of minority

carriers

 

Week 7

·        Introduction to semiconductor devices

·        pn Junctions, Formation of a PN Junction

 

Week 8

·        PN Junction Diodes, Bias of PN Junctions

·        Diode Equation, Diode Equations for PV, Ideal Diode Equation

 

Week 9

·        BJTs, MOSFETs

 

Week 10

·        Thermogenerator

 

Week 11

·        Semiconductors in optoelectronics

·        Generation, Absorption of Light, Absorption Coefficient, Absorption Depth, Generation Rate

·        Solar Cells and its characteristics

 

Week 12

·        Light-emitting diodes and its characteristics

·        Laser diodes and its characteristics

 

Week 13

·        Photodiodes and its characteristics

·        Generation Lifetime-Recombination Lifetime

 

Week 14

·        Power semiconductor devices

 

Week 15

·        Miscellaneous

The above outlines serve only as a rough guideline of the course contents and may be changed as and when deemed necessary by the instructor.

The instructor is at a liberty to best distribute number of lectures to cover the entire course

 

ES472 Lasers Engineering and Applications

ES472 Lasers Engineering and Applications (3 Credit Hours) – Fall 2023

Pre-Requisite: ES376 Optical Engineering Instructor: Engr. Dr. Muhammad Usman

Office # G-1 FES, GIK Institute, Email: m.usman@giki.edu.pk

Office Hours: 2.30 pm – 4.00 pm.

Course Introduction

 

The word LASER is an acronym for “Light Amplification by Stimulated Emission of Radiation “. The resulting light is highly monochromatic, intense, coherent, directional than other light sources such as incandescent lamps, fluorescence tubes, etc. Since its discovery, this special light has found a lot of applications. The course introduces students to the background and theory of lasers.

It also covers the applications of lasers in various fields such as medicine, military, communication, and scientific investigations, etc..

 

Course Contents

•        Introduction to the Laser

•        Laser Theory

•        Laser Beam Properties

•        Types of Lasers

•        Laser Applications:

•        Metrological Applications

•        Interferometry

·        Material Processing Lasers

•        Environmental Monitoring

•        Medical Applications etc.

Mapping of CLOs & PLOs

 

 

By the end of the course, the student will be able to:

 

CLOs

Course Learning Outcomes

PLOs

Taxonomy

 

CLO-1

Solve the problems related to lasing mechanism.

PLO-1

(Engineering Knowledge)

Cognitive Level-3 (Application)

 

CLO-2

Analyze various types of lasers and related mechanisms.

PLO-2

(Problem Analysis)

Cognitive Level-4

(Analyzing)

 

CLO-3

Construct laser characteristics (electronic, thermal, physical          etc.)                  and/or design     laser       for                  various

applications.

PLO-3

(Design/Development of

Solutions)

Cognitive Level-6 (Creating)

 

CLO-4

Describe an engineering application of lasers which can

be useful for the society.

PLO-6

(Engineer and Society)

Cognitive Level-2

(Understanding)

 

CLO-5

Communicate the results of an investigation/project

related to laser applications.

PLO-10

(Communication)

Affective Domain Level-2

(Responding)

CLOs Direct Assessment Mechanism

 

 

CLO #

Assessment Tools

 

CLO1

Assignments, Quizzes, Midterm Exam, Final Exam

CLO2

Assignments, Quizzes, Midterm Exam, Final Exam

CLO3

Assignments, Complex Engineering Problem (Project)

CLO4

Assignments, Mid, Final

CLO5

Complex Engineering Problem (Project)

         

 

Overall Grading Policy

 

 

Assessment Tools

Percentage

 

Quizzes

15%

Assignments

5%

Midterm Examination

30%

Course Project (Complex Engineering Problem)

10%

Final Examination

40%

 

 

Text and Reference Books

Textbook:

1.      Elijah Kannatey-Asibu Jr., “Principles of Laser Materials Processing” (Second Edition) (2023)

Reference books:

1.      Eugene Hecht, A. R. Ganesan, “Optics” 5th Edition. (Global Edition) (2017)

2.      William T. Silfvast, “Laser Fundamentals” (Second Edition) (2004)

3.      Richard S. Quimby, “Photonics and Lasers-An Introduction” (2006)

4.      Ronald G. Driggers, “Encyclopedia of Optical Engineering” (2003)

5.      Allen Nussbaum, Richard A. Phillips, “Contemporary Optics for Scientists and Engineers” (1976)

Administrative Instructions + Online Teaching SOPs

▪        According to institute policy, 80% attendance is mandatory to appear in the final examination.

▪        Assignments must be submitted as per instructions mentioned in the assignments.

▪        Students must pay attention to reading the textbooks chapter for course assessment rather than lecture slides.

▪        In any case, there will be no retake of (scheduled/surprise) quizzes.

▪        For queries, kindly follow the office hours to avoid any inconvenience.

Online Teaching Related Instructions

●       During mandatory closure of HEIs, course will be shifted to online mode using MS Teams, where lectures are given in synchronous mode according to announced schedule.

●       Lectures are also recorded for later viewing in case any students have connectivity issues.

●       Quizzes and assignments are administered through the MS Teams assignment system.

Supporting Tools for Course Delivery

MS Teams, Turnitin, Nanohub.org Virtual Tools, SiLENSeTM

 

Lecture Breakdown

 

 

Week 1

·        Introduction

·        Lasing mechanism

·        Population Inversion

 

 

Week 2

·        Rate Equation

·        Spontaneous And Stimulated Raman Effect

 

Week 3

·        Optical Absorption

·        Threshold gain

·        Two Photon Absorption

 

Week 4

·        Laser Cavity

·        Laser modes

·        Mode Selection

 

Week 5

·        Laser Pumping-Optical Arc

·        Pumping Efficiency

 

Week 6

·        Three Level System

·        Four-Level System

 

Week 7

·        Blackbody Radiation-

·        Kirchhoff”s Radiation Law-

·        Stefan-Boltzmann Law-

·        Wien Displacement Law

 

Week 8

·        Line Broadening

·        Continuous-Pulsed beams

 

Week 9

·        Beam Characteristics – Intensity and Brightness – Frequency Stabilization Beam Size

– Focusing

·        Beam Expanders – Beam Splitters – Beam Delivery

 

 

Week 10

·        Continuous-Pulsed beams

·        Q-Switching

·        Mode Locking

 

 

Week 11

Classification of Lasers

·        He-Ne Lasers

·        Ion Laser

·        He-Cd laser

 

Week 12

Classification of Lasers (Contd..)

·        Ruby Lasers

·        Nd:YAG Lasers

·        CO2 Lasers

 

Week 13

Classification of Lasers (Contd..)

·        Dye Lasers

·        Semiconductor Lasers/Laser Diodes

·        Excimer Laser

 

Week 14

Applications of lasers

·        Laser Material Processing (e.g., Cutting & Welding)

·        Laser Eye Surgery

·        Laser Fusion

·        Laser Cooling

·        Laser Medicine etc.

 

Week 15

Applications of lasers (Contd..)

·        Modern Topics of Interest

The above outlines serve only as a rough guideline of the course contents and may be changed as and when deemed necessary by the instructor. The instructor is at a liberty to best distribute number of lectures to cover the entire course

 

ES213 Computer Architecture

ES 213 Computer Architecture Spring 2023

Pre-Requisite: CS101, ES212

Instructor: Syed Sibtul Hassan Sherazi

 Email: sibtul.hassan@giki.edu.pk Office G-66 FES Building

Office hours: After the lunch or via appointment

 

Website: https://giki.edu.pk/personnel/engr-syed-sibtul-hassan-sherazi/

Course Introduction

This course provides a thorough introduction to internal architecture and working of microprocessors. The use of microprocessors in digital systems and their working in conjunction with memory devices, interrupt controllers and other input/output devices are studied. Circuits for address decoding and memory mapping are described. The assembly language programming includes learning the instruction set, addressing modes, interrupts and other programming functions.

Course Content

 Computer Evolution and Performance, Designing for Performance, Embedded Systems, A Top-Level View of

 Computer Function and Interconnection,  Cache Memory  ,Internal Memory Technology,  External Memory ,Input/Output, Computer Arithmetic, Instruction Sets: Characteristics and Functions, Instructions Sets:

 Addressing Modes and Formats, Processor Structure and Function, Instruction Level Parallelism and Superscalar

 Processors, Control Unit Operations

Mapping of Class Learning Outcome (CLOs) to Program Learning Outcomes (PLOs)

S. No

CLOS

PLOs

Bloom Taxonomy

CLO1

Compare and explain basic computer architecture and its fundamentals

PLO1 (Engineering Knowledge)

C3 (Applying)

 

CLO2

Evaluate         performance                          of processors and memory using accessing                          methods                        and benchmarking techniques

PLO2 (Problem Analysis)

C3 (Applying)

CLO3

Ability to examine different Input – output communication and storage elements of the computer

PLO2 (Problem Analysis)

C3 (Applying)

CLO4

Discuss and report code of ethics in computing instantiated by regulatory bodies like IEEE/SPIE/PEC

PLO8 (Ethics)

C2 (Understanding)

CLO5

Attend seminars on techniques used to improve the performance and cost effectiveness of embedded systems

PLO12 (Lifelong Learning)

C2 (Understanding)

Grading Policy

Assessment Items

% Marks

1.

Quizzes

20%

2.

Assignment

5%

3.

Mid-Term Exam

25%

4.

Course Project/Report

5%

5.

Final Exams

45%

Text and Reference Books

Text Book:

 

Computer Organization and Architecture (William Stallings 2010)

 

Reference Book:

 

Logic and Computer Design Fundamentals by Morris Mano, Charles R. Kime and Mom Martin

      

 

Administrative Instruction

·        Student Attendance is expected to be 100%, and minimum 80% (mandatory) attendance that is required to sit in the final exams

·        All the direct assessment tools i.e., Quizzes, Assignment, Midterms and Final Exams must be attempted. Failure to attempt in any of the assessment tools without any medical reasons may results to fail in that particular assessment.

·        For any query, please contact me

Lecture Breakdown

Week#1

Introduction, Organization and Architecture, Structure and Function

Week#2

Computer Evolution and Performance, Designing for Performance, Embedded Systems

Week#3

A Top-Level View of Computer Function and Interconnection

·        Computer Components

·        Interconnection Structures

·        Bus Interconnection

·        PCI

Week#4

Cache Memory

 

·        Principles

·        Elements of Cache Design

·        Intel, ARM Cache Organization

Week#5

Internal Memory Technology

 

·        Semiconductor Main Memory

·        Error Connection

·        Advanced DRAM Organization

Week#6

External Memory

 

·        Magnetic Disk, RAID, Optical Memory

Week#7

Input/Output

 

·        External Devices

·        I/O Modules, Programmed I/O, Interrupt-Driven I/O

·        Direct Memory Access

 

Week#8

Operating System Support

 

·        Scheduling

·        Memory Management

·        Pentium/ARM Memory Management

Mid Exam break – One week

Week#9

Computer Arithmetic

 

·        ALU, Integer Representation

·        Integer Arithmetic, Floating-Point Representation

Week#10

Instruction Sets: Characteristics and Functions

 

·        Machine Instruction Characteristics

·        Types of Operands and Operations

Week#11

Instructions Sets: Addressing Modes and Formats

 

·        Addressing

·        Instruction Formats

·        Assembly Language

Week#12

Processor Structure and Function

 

·        Processor, Register Organization

·        Instruction Cycle, Pipelining

Week#13

Reduction Instruction Set Computers

 

·        Instruction Execution Characteristics, Use of a Large Register File

·        Compiler Based Register Optimization

·        RISC Architecture, Pipelining

Week#14

Instruction Level Parallelism and Superscalar Processors

 

·        Design Issues

·        ARM Cortex-A8

Week#15

Control Unit Operations

 

·        Micro-operations

·        Controls of the Processor

·        Hardwired Implementation

 

ES344 Optimization Modeling

Syllabus/Course Outline Optimization Modeling (ES 344) Spring Semester 2023

Pre-Requisite(s):       ES 202 – Engineering Statistics and ES 342 – Modeling Processes

Instructor:                  Engr. Shahid Ahmad Office: Room G-8, FES Phone: 2220

Email: Shahid.Ahmad@giki.edu.pk

 

Office Hours:             Posted outside office door of course instructor. Also, by appointment.

Course Introduction

This course is a second course in “Modeling and Optimization” of different phenomena that occur in science and engineering. It is continuation of the first course in this stream, that is Modeling Processes, and its focus is on Graphical Models and Stochastic Models. It is a required course for students specializing in “Modeling and Simulation”, one of emerging stream offered by the Faculty of Engineering Sciences. The main purpose of the course is to make students proficient in modern techniques of mathematical modeling and solving optimization problems encountered in real situations. Different quantitative techniques developed to find optimal solutions of problems of practical nature in Engineering Management are discussed in detail. Students are expected to have good background of linear algebra and probability theory for this course. On completion of this course, the students will be trained enough to appreciate the power of these techniques and apply these mathematical tools to solve similar problems in other areas.

Course Contents

 

·        Transportation and Assignment Problems: Balanced and unbalanced transport problems, LP and network formulation, solution algorithm, assignment problem as LP and transport problem, degeneracy in assignment problem, Hungarian algorithm, interpretation of solutions.

·        Integer Linear Programming: Various examples requiring modeled as Integer Linear Programming, Zero-One Linear Programming, model formulation techniques.

·        Network Models: Problems requiring network models, basic terminology of graph theory, spanning trees, minimum cost, and maximum flow problems, solution algorithms.

·        Project Management: PERT and CPM, forward pass and backward pass, critical path, uncertain activity durations, scheduling and controlling project costs.

·        Inventory Models: Deterministic and stochastic inventory problems, EOQ model and its ramifications, newsvendor’s problem and simple stochastic inventory models.

·        Queueing Models: Queueing models and basic terminology, Poisson process, distribution of inter-arrival and service times, simple M/M/K systems.

Administrative Instructions

·        According to institute policy, 80% attendance is mandatory to appear in the final examination.

·        Assignments must be submitted as per instructions given for each assignment.

·        In any case, there will be no retake of (scheduled/surprise) quizzes.

 

Text and Reference Books

Textbook:

·        Introduction to Operations Research by Frederick S. Hillier and Gerald J. Lieberman (10th Edition, McGraw-Hill Education USA, 2015).

Reference Books:

·        Operations Research: Applications and Algorithms by Wayne L. Winston , (4th Edition, Duxbury Press USA, 2003).

·        Operations Research: An Introduction by Hamdy A. Taha (10th Edition, Pearson USA, 2016).

·        Handouts/Reading Material

Grading Policy (Subject to Change at the Discretion of Instructor)

Assessment Items

Percentage

Announced Quizzes

20%

Midterm Exam

30%

Final Exam

40%

Project/CEP/Reports

10%

Mapping of CLOs to PLOs

Sr. No

Course Learning Outcomes

PLOs

Bloom’s Taxonomy

 

After completion of this course the student will be

able to:

 

CLO-1

Formulate a given problem in terms of linear, non- linear, network and stochastic models.

PLO-2

(Problem Analysis)

Cognitive Level-3 (Applying)

CLO-2

Solve different mathematical models to reach optimal solutions and interpret them.

PLO-3

(Design/Development of Solutions)

Cognitive Level-4 (Analyzing)

CLO-3

Investigate applied real-world problems by employing optimization and modeling techniques and suggest improvements.

PLO-4

(Investigation)

Cognitive Level-5 (Evaluating)

CLO-4

Formally present the results of an investigation related to a real problem/method.

PLO-10

(Communication)

Affective Level-2 (Responding to Phenomena)

 

CLO-5

Attend three engineering, science, and technology related seminars/talks (physical, online, recorded) and critically analyze their

strong and weak points.

PLO-12

(Lifelong Learning)

 

Affective Level-3 (Valuing)

Direct Assessment Tools for CLOs

CLOs

Assessment Tools

CLO-1

Quizzes, Assignments, Midterm Exam, Final Exam, Projects

CLO-2

Quizzes, Assignments, Midterm Exam, Final Exam

CLO-3

Assignments, Final Exam, CEP

CLO-4

Project (CEP) Report, Class Presentation

CLO-5

Report

Computer Usage

Students are encouraged to solve some assigned homework problems using the available software of Operations Research. All reports must be typed and submitted either in Word or PDF Format. Soft copies of reports must also be provided.

      

 

Lecture Breakdown

Lecture 1: Brief review of Linear Programming and Simplex algorithm

Lecture 2: Transportation problem and its formulation

Lecture 3: Transportation algorithm

Lecture 4: Transportation algorithm continued Lecture 5: Examples on using transportation algorithm Lecture 6: Special cases for transportation algorithm Lecture 7: Transshipment problem and its solution

Lecture 8: Assignment problem and assignment models

Lecture 9: Hungarian algorithm for solution of assignment problems Lecture 10:Special cases and variants of assignment models Lecture 11:Examples of Integer Linear Programming

Lecture 12:Network models, basic terminology of graph theory

Lecture 13:Spanning trees and related problems

Lecture 14:Shortest distance in a network and solution algorithms Lecture 15:Maximum flow problem in a networks and solution algorithms Lecture 16:More examples of network models

Lecture 17:Project management, PERT and CPM network

Lecture 18:PERT and CPM network calculations, forward and reverse pass

Lecture 19:Critical path and project duration

Lecture 20:Uncertain activity durations and related calculations Lecture 21:Time and cost trade-offs, crashing a project Lecture 22:Linear Programming in Project Management Lecture 23:Description of inventory problem

Lecture 24:Basic EOQ formula for deterministic inventory model Lecture 25:Generalising EOQ procedure for more deterministic models Lecture 26:Production schedule as an inventory model

Lecture 27:Probabilistic inventory models, review of basic probability

Lecture 28:Simple news-vendor problem and its solution

Lecture 29:Generalisation of news-vendor problem to other probabilistic inventory models

Lecture 30:Other examples of probabilistic inventory models

Lecture 31:Summing up inventory models

Lecture 32:Queueing models and their terminology Lecture 33:Types and classification of queueing models Lecture 34:Poisson process

Lecture 35:Simple birth and death processes

Lecture 36:Simple M/M/1 queus

Lecture 37:Arrival process and service process

Lecture 38:Inter-arrival and service times, relationship with Poisson Process

Lecture 39:Calculation of various performance measures

Lecture 40:M/M/K parallel systems

Lecture 41:Performance measures of M/M/K parallel systems

Lecture 42:Summing up quueueing systems Lecture 43:Review and problem session Lecture 44:CEP Presentations

Lecture 45:CEP Presentations

 

Note: This outline serves only as a rough guidance of the course. It may be changed or modified as and when deemed necessary by the instructor. The instructor is at liberty to best distribute number of lectures and/or change the sequence of topics to cover the entire course.

ES446 Heat Transfer and Modelling

 

ES446 Heat Transfer and Modelling (3 Credit Hours) – Spring 2023 (3 CH)

Pre-Requisite: MT201

Instructor: Engineer Syed Sibtul Hassan Sherazi

Office # G-66 FES, GIK Institute, Email: sibtul.hassan@giki.edu.pk Office Hours: 2.30 pm – 4.00 pm or via appointment

Course Introduction

This course is organized to apprise students about heat and mass transfer mechanisms and after the basic understanding of these mechanisms, they will be able to model and analyze such mechanisms not only using the mathematical equations, but also using mechanical tools and softwares. In addition to it, students will explore the innovative ways , applications of these mechanisms and at the end of course, will explore the research fields and methods in heat and mass transfer.

Course Contents

●                 Introduction and basic concepts of heat and mass transfer mechanism and their physics.

●                 Modeling and simulation of heat and mass transfer mechanisms using the modern tools.

●                 Analysis of heat and mass transfer mechanisms using mathematical models and equations.

●                 Impacts and applications of heat and mass transfer mechanisms on humans and environment.

●                 Recent trends and innovations in the heat and mass transfer mechanisms

Mapping of CLOs & PLOs

 

 

By the end of the course, the student will be able to:

 

CLOs

Course Learning Outcomes

PLOs

Blooms Taxonomy

 

CLO-1

Be able to analyze and model heat and mass

transfer mechanisms using mathematical models and equations.

PLO-2

(Problem Analysis)

Cognitive Level-4 (Analysis)

 

CLO-2

Be able to comprehend the heat transfer mechanisms and their applications.

PLO-1

(Engineering Knowledge)

Cognitive Level-2 (Comprehension)

 

CLO-3

Be able to study, model and analyze heat and mass transfer mechanism using modern engineering

tools and softwares.

PLO-5

(Modern Tool Usage)

Cognitive Level-5 (Synthesis)

 

CLO-4

Be able to comprehend the impacts of heat and mass transfer mechanism impacts on humans and society

PLO-7

(Environment and

Sustainability)

Cognitive Level-2 (Comprehension)

 

CLO-5

Attend three seminars/talks (physical, online, recorded)              related                         to                fundamentals                         and

applications      of     heat      and      mass                            transfer mechanisms.

PLO-12

(Lifelong Learning)

Affective Level-4 (Valuing)

CLOs Direct Assessment Mechanism

 

 

CLO #

Assessment Tools

 

 

CLO1

Quizzes, Assignments, Midterm Exam, Final Exam

 

CLO2

Quizzes, Assignments, Midterm Exam, Final Exam

 

CLO3

Project, Viva, Presentation, Midterm Exam, Assignments

 

CLO4

Report + Viva + Presentation, Final Exam

 

CLO5

Assignments, Midterm Exam, Final Exam

       

 

Overall Grading Policy

 

 

Assessment Tools

Percentage

 

 

Quizzes (Surprise + Scheduled) + Viva

15%

 

Assignments + Viva

5%

 

Midterm Examination

15%

 

Course Project (Complex Engineering Problem)

15%

 

Research Report+ Viva+Presentation

5%

 

Lifelong learning Problems

5%

 

Final Examination

40%

Text and Reference Books

Besides the handouts given in class, following reference materials shall be used:

Textbook:

1. Heat and Mass Transfer: Fundamentals and Applications, Yunus A. Çengel, 6th Edition, 2020

Reference Books:

1.  Fundamentals of momentum, heat and mass transfer, James R. Welty, 6th Edition, 2014

2.  Fundamentals of Heat and Mass Transfer, Theodore L. Bergman,7th Edition, 2011

3.  Multiphysics Modeling Using COMSOL: A First Principles Approach, Roger W. Pryor, 2009

 

 

Administrative Instructions + Online Teaching SOPs

▪        According to institute policy, 80% attendance is mandatory to appear in the final examination.

▪        In any case, there will be no retake of (scheduled/surprise) quizzes.

▪        For queries, kindly follow the office hours to avoid any inconvenience.

Online Teaching Related Instructions

 

●       During mandatory closure of HEIs, course are shifted to MS Teams, where lectures are given in synchronous mode according to announced schedule.

●       Lectures are also recorded for later viewing in case any students have connectivity issues.

●       Quizzes and assignments are administered through the MS Teams assignment system.

●       In order to discourage use of unfair means in quizzes, viva option has been added.

Computer Usage

Students are encouraged to solve some assigned tasks using the available engineering software, such as Mathematica, MATLAB, COMSOL and Ansys.

 

Lecture Breakdown

Lectures

CLO_2, PLO_1:

Part 1: Study of Basic Concepts of Heat and Mass Transfer and their Applications: Introduction to Heat and Mass Transfer Concepts:

·        Law of Thermodynamics

·        Heat and Specific Heat

·        Energy Transfer by Heat

 

 

3

Introduction to Heat Transfer Mechanism:

·        Conduction

·        Convection

·        Radiation

 

4

Discussion on the International Codes and Standards for the Heat Transfer Mechanism

 

2

CLO_1, PLO_2:

Part 2 (A): Analysis of Heat and Mass Transfer Mechanism Using Mathematical Models and Equations:

·        One Dimension Heat Conduction Equation

·        General Heat Equation

·        Applying Boundary and Initial Conditions on Heat Transfer Phenomena

 

6

Steady and Transient Heat Conduction Mechanism

5

Numerical Methods in Heat Transfer Mechanism

4

CLO_3, PLO_5:

Part 2 (B): Analysis of Heat and Mass Transfer Mechanism Using Mathematical Tools and Engineering Softwares:

Modelling and Simulation of Heat Transfer Mechanism Using Mathematical Tools and Engineering Softwares

 

7

CLO_3, PLO_5:

Part 3: Modelling and Simulation of Heat Transfer Mechanism

Modelling and Simulation of Heat Transfer Mechanism Using Mechanical Design and Simulation Tools

and Softwares

7

CLO_4, PLO_7:

Impacts of Innovative methods of Heat and Mass Transfer on Humans and Society

3

CLO_5, PLO_12:

Recent trends and research methods on Heat and Mass Transfer Mechanisms and their Modelling

 

2

CLO_2, PLO_1:

Common Devices Used for Heat and Mass Transfer Mechanism

 

2

 

ES447 Financial Engineering Models

Syllabus/Course Outline Financial Engineering Models (ES 447)

Spring Semester 2023

Course Code   :     ES 447

Course Title    :     Financial Engineering Models

Credit Hours   :     3

Pre-Requisites:     ES 445, ES 445L

Course Instructor

Name              :     Shahid Ahmad

Office              :     Room G8, FES

Email               :     Shahid.Ahmad@giki.edu.pk

Office Hours   :     Mon to Thu: 10:00 – 11:30 am

Course Introduction

This course is last of the required courses for students specializing in “Modeling and Simulation” stream offered by the Faculty of Engineering Sciences. The course introduces the students to the exciting field of “Financial Engineering” a rapidly developing area requiring advanced quantitative techniques to model and solve Financial Models. The main objective of the course is to make students proficient in modern techniques of mathematical modeling and analyzing these models by performing Simulations. On completion of this course, the students will be trained enough to embark on the advanced studies in this area or in a field work requiring Modeling and Simulation of Financial Models.

Course Contents

·        Corporate Finance and Valuation

·        Time Value of Money

·        Simple and Compound Interest. Discounting

·        Cash Flows and their Present and Future Values

·        Annuities and Perpetuities

·        Risk Free Assets and their Evaluation, Bonds

·        Risky Assets and Stock Prices

·        Stock and Money Market Models

·        Binomial and Trinomial Tree Models

·        Options and Option Pricing Models

·        The Binomial Option Pricing Model

·        The Principle of No Arbitrage

·        Portfolio Models

·        Monte Carlo Methods

·        Simulating Stock Prices

·        Monte Carlo Simulations for Investments

·        Simulating Options and Option Strategies

·        Monte Carlo Methods for Option Pricing

Text and Reference Books

Text Book:

•        “Financial Modeling” by Simon Benninga, 4th Edition 2014, MIT Press USA.

Reference Books:

•       “Mathematics for Finance – An Introduction to Financial Engineering” by Capinski Marek, Springer 2004, USA

•        “Financial Simulation Modeling in Excel” by Keith A. Allman, 1st Edition 2011, John Wiley USA.

•        Handouts/Reading Material

 

Mapping of CLOs to PLOs

Sr/No

CLOs

PLOs

Bloom’s Taxonomy

CLO 1

Formulate a given financial engineering

problem in terms of an appropriate model.

PLO-2

(Problem Analysis)

Cognitive Level-3 (Applying)

 

CLO 2

Solve a modeled financial engineering problem by applying appropriate techniques and interpret the results.

PLO-3

(Design/Development of Solutions)

 

Cognitive Level-4 (Analyzing)

 

CLO-3

Investigate financial problems by employing computer simulation methods and suggest improvements.

PLO-4

(Investigation)

 

Cognitive Level-5 (Evaluating)

 

CLO-4

Formally present the results of an investigation related to a simulation problem/method.

PLO-10

(Communication)

Affective Level-2 (Responding to Phenomena)

 

CLO-5

Attend three engineering, science, and technology related seminars/talks (physical,

online, recorded) and critically analyze their

PLO-12

(Lifelong Learning)

 

Affective Level-3 (Valuing)

Grading Policy (Subject to Change at the Discretion of Instructor)

Assessment Items

Percentage

Announced Quizzes

20%

Midterm Exam

30%

Final Exam

40%

Project/CEP/Reports

10%

Direct Assessment Tools for CLOs

CLOs

Assessment Tools

CLO-1

Quizzes, Assignments, Midterm Exam, Final Exam, Projects

CLO-2

Quizzes, Assignments, Midterm Exam, Final Exam

CLO-3

Assignments, Final Exam, CEP

CLO-4

Project (CEP) Report, Class Presentation

CLO-5

Report

Administrative Instructions

•       Student classroom attendance is expected to be 100%; minimum 80% (mandatory) attendance is required to sit in the final examination.

•       Students may work on home assignments in collaboration with each other, but they must submit their own work; no copying from others. Violation of this will adversely affect their quiz/exam results.

•       Class participation is highly encouraged.

•       All quizzes/examinations will be closed book. No mobile phones will be allowed.

•       In any case, there will be no retake of scheduled/surprise quizzes.

•       All the direct assessment tools i.e., Quizzes, Assignments, Midterm, Projects and Final Exam must be attempted. Failure to attempt in any of these assessment tools without any medical reason may result in failing that particular assessment.

Lab and Computer Usage

This is computer-intensive course and requires simulations of various models. Students are required to learn and solve assigned problems/term projects in the lab. All reports must be typed and submitted either in Word or PDF Format. Soft copies of reports must also be provided.

     

 

 

Lecture Breakdown

Lecture#01

Modeling in Financial Engineering

Lecture#02

Time Value of Money

Lecture#03

Simple and Compound Interest

Lecture#04

Continuous Compounding and Effective Rate of Interest

Lecture#05

Present Value and Future Value

Lecture#06

Stream of Cash Flows and NPV

Lecture#07

Evaluation of Projects by NPV Method

Lecture#08

IRR and Evaluation of Projects by IRR Method

Lecture#09

Annuities and Perpetuities

Lecture#10

Designing Employee Benefit Plans

Lecture#11

Leasing and Expansion Projects by Leasing

Lecture#12

Mortgage Plans

Lecture#13

Risk Free Assets and Bonds

Lecture#14

Bond Structures

Lecture#15

Evaluation of Bonds

Lecture#16

Risky Assets – Stocks

Lecture#17

Evaluation of Stocks

Lecture#18

Stock and Money Market Models

Lecture#19

Binomial Tree Model

Lecture#20

Binomial Tree Model continued…

Lecture#21

The Principle of No Arbitrage

Lecture#22

Application to the Binomial Tree Model

Lecture#23

Portfolio Models – Introduction

Lecture#24

Risk and Expected Return on a Portfolio

Lecture#25

Capital Asset Pricing Model

Lecture#26

Forward Contracts

Lecture#27

Value of a Forward Contract

Lecture#28

Futures Contracts – Hedging with Futures

Lecture#29

Introduction to Options

Lecture#30

The Binomial Option Pricing Model

Lecture#31

European Options and American Options

Lecture#32

European Options in the Binomial Tree Model

Lecture#33

American Options in the Binomial Tree Model

Lecture#34

An Introduction to Monte Carlo Methods

Lecture#35

Generating and Using Random Variates

Lecture#36

Simulating Stock Prices

Lecture#37

Simulating Stock Prices (continued)

Lecture#38

Monte Carlo Simulations for Investments

Lecture#39

Monte Carlo Simulations for Investments (continued)

Lecture#40

Using Monte Carlo Methods for Option Pricing I

Lecture#41

Using Monte Carlo Methods for Option Pricing II

Lecture#42

Summary and Conclusion

 

Lecture#43

CEP Presentations

Lecture#44

CEP Presentations

Lecture#45

Review Session

 

Note: This outline serves only as a rough guidance of the course. It may be changed or modified, and course contents/sequence of lectures may be increased/decreased/changed as and when deemed necessary by the instructor.

ES475 Optical Communications and Computing

ES475: Optical Communications and Computing                                                                 Spring 2023

 

Pre-Requisite: ES376 Optical Engineering Instructor: Dr. Asad Mahmood

Email: asad.mahmood@giki.edu.pk Office: G-9, FES

Phone: 2285

Consultation hours: During office hours, or by appointment for long consultation

 

Course Introduction

Optical communications, in form of fiber optic communications, free space optics etc., is becoming an integral component of modern telecommunication infrastructure. This course is designed to give an introductory understanding of the basics of optical communications, in particular focusing on fiber-optic communications. An understanding of basic concepts, theory, principals and components involved in the optical communication is given in the start and mid of this course. Last part of the course aims to introduce to the students the optical network architecture at a high-level, and if time permits, introductory concepts of optical computing are briefly discussed at the end of the course.

 

Course Content

1.      Overview of fiber optic communication: Advantages of optical fiber communication, key elements of optical communications, optical spectral bands, units etc.

2.      Optical fiber waveguides: Nature of light, basic optical laws, optical fiber modes, key results of mode theory, single and multi-mode fibers, fiber materials and fabrication, optical cables etc.

3.      Transmission characteristics of optical fibers: Signal Attenuation, Signal Dispersion, transmission characteristics of single-mode fibers, international standards

4.      Optical sources: Basics of semiconductor physics, LEDs, LASER diodes, heterojunction structure,

5.      Power launching and coupling: Source-to-fiber power launching, lensing schemes for coupling improvement, fiber-to-fiber joints, Fiber splicing, optical fiber connectors

6.      Photodetectors: Physical principles of Photodiodes, Photodetector noise, Response time, Comparison of photodetectors etc.

7.      Optical receiver: Optical Receiver Operation, digital receiver performance, eye diagrams etc.

8.      Optical System design: System considerations, link power budget, rise time budget, Power penalties

9.      WDM concepts and components:    Overview of WDM operation principles, passive optical couplers, Mach-Zehnder  interferometer

10.  Optical networks: Basic Network concepts, Network topologies, SONET / SDH, Optical switching, WDM network examples

11.  Optical computing: Basic motivation for optical computing, Basic concepts and components of optical

Processing, Recent developments

 

Mapping of CLOs and PLOs

Sr. No.

Course Learning Outcomes

PLOs

Blooms

Taxonomy

CLO1

Apply fundamental optical principles for the analysis of optical fibers and systems

PLO1

(Engineering Knowledge)

C3

(Application)

CLO2

Analyze important components and systems for optical communication, e.g., optical fibers, sources, detectors, multiplexers, networks etc.

PLO2

(Problem Analysis)

C4

(Analyzing)

CLO3

Design a component, link, or system of optical communications for a target set of desirables and constraints.

PLO3

(Design/Development of Solutions)

C5

(Evaluating)

CLO4

Present effectively via an oral presentation the solution of the Complex Engineering Problem given in the course

PLO10

(Communication)

A3

(Valuing)

CLO5

Demonstrate understanding of professional ethics and practice one or more as part of course.

PLO8 (Ethics)

A3

(Valuing)

 

CLO Assessment Mechanism

 

 

CLO1

CLO2

CLO3

CLO4

CLO5

Quizzes

1-2 Quizzes

3-4 Quizzes

1-2 Quizzes

 

 

CEP

 

 

1 report

1 presentation

1 presentation

Midterm Exam

2 Qs

1-2 Qs

 

 

 

Final Exam

 

3-4 Qs

1-2 Qs

 

 

 

Grading policy

Assessment items

Weightage

5*Announced Quizzes

15%

5*Assignments

5%

1*Complex Engineering Problem Assignment +

Presentation

9%

1*Ethics assignment

1%

1*Midterm exam

30%

1*Final exam

40%

 

Text and Reference Books

Text books:

1.      Optical Fiber Communication, Gerd Keiser, 4th/5th Ed., MGH, 2008/2017.

2.      Fiber Optic Communications, Lecture Notes, Prof. Walter Johnstone

 

Reference books:

3.      Optical Fiber Communications, John M. Senior, Pearson Education. 3rd Impression, 2009.

4.      Fiber-optic Communication Systems, G. P. Agarwal, 4th Edition.

5.      Optical Networks by Rajiv Ramaswami and Kumar N. Sivarajan

6.      Fiber optic communication – Joseph C Palais: 4th Edition, Pearson Education.

7.      Fiber Optics Communication and Other Applications by H Zanger and C Zanger

 

Administrative Instructions

·        Preparing for the assignment quizzes is the best way to do well in this course, as they will be interspersed throughout the semester and you will have ample amount to prepare IF you plan nicely. I try to make most part of all the assessments including Heavy-weightage Quizzes, Midterm and Final examination related to the questions given in the assignments

·        All the assessments (Heavy-weightage quizzes, Midterm and Final Exam) will be from the book topics covered in the lectures. Hence, make sure that you read the book topics thoroughly and NOT rely ONLY on the slides, which are made only to assist in lecturing

·        Quizzes/Assignments schedule will be announced in the start of the class. The dates will not be changed, hence make sure to plan your other commitments accordingly as you will be given ample amount of time to prepare for each quiz

·        Please do not make the class noisy. As 4th year students, it is expected of you to act maturely in the classes. You are allowed to go out of the class quietly if there is something urgent that needs your attention

·        80% attendance is mandatory to be allowed to sit in the final examination as per institute’s policy

 

Lecture Breakdown:

·        Week 1 Lectures              Introduction to course, overview of optical fiber communications (Ch. 1)

·        Week 2 Lectures               Basic optical laws and optical fiber modes (Ch. 2)

·        Week 3 Lectures               Key results of mode theory and optical fiber characteristics (Ch. 2)

·        Week 4 Lectures               Signal attenuation and dispersion in Optical Fibers (Ch. 3)

·        Week 5 Lectures               Transmission characteristics of single mode fibers (Ch. 3)

·        Week 6 lectures                Semiconductor physic basics and LEDs (Ch. 4)

·        Week 7 lectures                Laser diodes and heterojunction structures (Ch. 4)

·        Week 8 lectures                Source-to-fiber launching and coupling improvements (Ch. 5)

·        Week 9 lectures                fiber coupling and physical principles of photodiodes (Ch. 5)

·        Week 10 lectures              photodetector noise and comparisons (Ch. 6)

·        Week 11 lectures              Optical Receiver Operation and digital receiver operation (Ch. 7)

  • Week 12 lectures  Eye-diagrams and link-power budget (Ch. 7 and Ch. 8)
  • Week 13 lectures  Rise-time budget and WDM operation principles (Ch. 8 and Ch. 10)
  • Week 14 lectures  Passive optical couplers and optical network topologies (Ch. 10 and Ch. 13)
  • Week 15 lectures SONET/SDH and optical switching (Ch. 13)

 

ES441L Engineering Optimization Lab

ES 441 L: Engineering Optimization Lab (1 CH)

FALL/Spring 202x

Lab Instructor:

 

Email:

 

Lab Engineer:

 

Email:

 

Lab Hours:

 

Students per workstation:

01

Batch:

 

Office:

 

Extension:

 

LAB OBJECTIVES

The primary goal of this lab is to train students to solve real-world optimization problems. In the planning or operation of an engineering system, engineers have to make technological and managerial decisions at several stages. The ultimate objective of all such decisions is to make optimal actions that result in a minimum effort required or to maximize the desired outcomes. This lab will introduce optimization tools, which will help students model an engineering design problem as an optimization problem, and then solve them with appropriate optimization methods.

LAB EQUIPMENT / APPARATUS

·        Desktop PC Computers

·        MATLAB, Julia Software

·        Microsoft Excel

MAPPING OF CLOs & PLOs

CLOs

Course Learning Outcomes

PLOs

Bloom’s Taxonomy

CLO-1

Be able to model engineering design problems as an optimization problem.

PLO-4

C3 and C4 (Application and Analysis)

CLO-2

Be able to solve the optimization problem by deploying appropriate optimization methods.

PLO-4

C3 and C4 (Application and Analysis)

CLO-4

Be able to communicate the result verbally/presentation and document the result through a written report.

PLO-10

A4 (Organization)

LAB EVALUATION

Particular

Total

Lab Assignments/Projects

60%

Open-ended Lab Project

10%

Midterm Exam (Written + Simulation Problem)

30%

Total

100%

LAB CONTENTS

Introduction to Matlab/Julia:

Students will be familiarized with Matlab, by introducing with basic features and commands of the program.

Lab 1

Introduction to Optimization:

Problem formulation (single and multivariable problem), Conditions for maxima and minima, Limits, Continuity, Extreme Value Theorem, etc. 

Lab 2

Unconstrained Optimization (Zero-Order Methods):

Students will learn how to solve an unconstrained optimization problem with methods like Nelder Mead, Kaczmarz and Coordinate Descent Algorithm.

Lab

3-5

Unconstrained Optimization  (First-Order Methods):

Students will learn how to solve an unconstrained optimization problem with methods like Gradient Descent, Steepest Descent, Golden search, Fibonacci Search, and Steepest descent Algorithms.

Lab

6-7

Unconstrained Optimization  (Second-Order Methods):

Students will learn how to solve an unconstrained optimization problem with methods like Newton methods (inexact and modified Newton methods), and Quasi-Newton methods.

Lab

7-8

Constrained Optimization:

Student will learn how to formulate a constrained optimization problem, handling of constraints (Lagrangian and KKT conditions, and penalty function).

Lab

9-10

Applications:

Solving Optimization problems from Electrical Grids.

Lab 10

Applications:

Solving Optimization problems from Financial Engineering (Manufacturing Costs, etc.).

Lab 11

Open Ended Lab (OEL) Project:

Students work on OEL.

Labs 12-13

             

 

INSTRUCTIONS/SUGGESTIONS FOR STUDENTS:

  • Work only on your assigned workstations.
  • Properly log-off and switch off your PC at the end of your work.
  • Bring your lab manuals in each lab.

ES442L Machine Learning Lab

ES 442L: Machine Learning Lab (1 CH)

FALL/Spring 202x

Lab Instructor:

 

Email:

 

Lab Engineer:

 

Email:

 

Lab Hours:

 

Students per workstation:

01

Batch:

 

Office:

 

Extension:

 

LAB OBJECTIVES

This module aims to provide students with an in-depth introduction to two main- areas of Machine Learning: supervised and unsupervised. It will cover some of the main models and algorithms for regression, classification, clustering and probabilistic classification. Topics such as linear and logistic regression, regularisation, probabilistic (Bayesian) inference, SVMs and neural networks, clustering and dimensionality reduction. The module will use primarily the Python programming language and assumes familiarity with linear algebra, probability theory, and programming in Python.

LAB EQUIPMENT / APPARATUS

·        Desktop PC Computers

·        Python

·        Microsoft Excel

MAPPING OF CLOs & PLOs

CLOs

Course Learning Outcomes

PLOs

Bloom’s Taxonomy

CLO-3

Develop an appreciation for what is involved in Learning models from data

 

PLO-3

C6 (Creating)

CLO-3

Appraise a wide variety of learning algorithms and learn to evaluate models generated from data

 

PLO-4

C5 (Evaluation)

CLO-3

Apply the algorithms using modern tools to a real problem, optimize the models learned and write a report on the expected accuracy that can be achieved by applying the models

 

PLO-5

C3 (Applying)

LAB EVALUATION

Particular

Total

Lab Assignments/Projects

60%

Open-ended Lab Project

10%

Midterm Exam (Written + Simulation Problem)

30%

Total

100%

LAB CONTENTS

Intro to Supervised/Unsupervised Learning

Lab 1

 

Decision Trees

Lab 2

Linear regression: OLS, regularization, linear classifiers

Lab 3

Logistic Regression, Multi-class logistic regression Ranking Support Vector Machines

Lab 4

Feature selection latent factor models (PCA)

Lab 5

Clustering (k-means, soft k-means)

Lab 6

Ensemble methods such as Random Forest and Ada Boost

Lab 7

Probabilistic methods (Bayesian view)

Lab 8

Model evaluation and model selection

Lab 9

Introduction to neural networks and convolutional neural networks

Lab 10

Autoencoders

Lab 11

Open Ended Lab (OEL) Project:

Students work on OEL.

Labs 12-13

             

 

INSTRUCTIONS/SUGGESTIONS FOR STUDENTS:

  • Work only on your assigned workstations.
  • Properly log-off and switch off your PC at the end of your work.
  • Bring your lab manuals in each lab.

Benchmarking: https://warwick.ac.uk/fac/sci/dcs/teaching/modules/cs342/#description

ES471L Model Engineering Lab

ES 471: Model Engineering Lab (1 CH)

FALL/Spring 202x

Lab Instructor:

 

Email:

 

Lab Engineer:

 

Email:

 

Lab Hours:

 

Students per workstation:

01

Batch:

 

Office:

 

Extension:

 

LAB OBJECTIVES

The main purpose of this lab is to equip students with a set of skills that will enable them to model complex engineering problems as mathematical models. Subsequently, modeling engineering systems as a set of Linear/Nonlinear equations, Differential-Algebraic Equations (DEAs), Differences equations, or stochastic models. In this lab, students will also learn different modeling toolboxes such as Simulink and Mathematic.

LAB EQUIPMENT / APPARATUS

·        Desktop PC Computers

·        MATLAB, SIMULINK and Mathematica Software

·        Microsoft Excel

MAPPING OF CLOs & PLOs

CLOs

Course Learning Outcomes

PLOs

Bloom’s Taxonomy

CLO-1

Be able to perform modeling techniques for analyzing engineering systems.

PLO-4

C3 and C4 (Application and Analysis)

CLO-2

Be able to model engineering problems with appropriate modeling techniques.  

PLO-4

C3 and C4 (Application and Analysis)

CLO-4

Be able to communicate the simulation result verbally/presentation and document the result through a written report.

PLO-10

A4 (Organization)

LAB EVALUATION

Particular

Total

Lab Assignments/Projects

60%

Open-ended Lab Project

10%

Midterm Exam (Written + Simulation Problem)

30%

Total

100%

LAB CONTENTS

Introduction to SIMULINK/Mathematica:

Students will be familiarized with Matlab, by introducing with basic features and commands of the program.

Lab 1

Introduction to Mathematical Modeling:

Basic review of Calculus, and Differential Equations, and Linear Algebra.

Lab 2

Modeling of Engineering Systems:

Students will learn how to model engineering systems as Linear systems of equations (Linear programming, Network flow models, etc).

Lab

3-4

Modeling of Engineering Systems:

Students will learn how to model engineering systems as Nonlinear systems of equations (Multivariable root finding problems, Non-linear programming models, applications from Circuit analysis, Power systems analysis, etc.).

Lab

5-6

Graphical Models:

Students will learn how to use Network Flow models, analyze graphical networks through a system of linear and nonlinear equations. 

Lab

7-8

Differential-Algebraic models: 

Students will learn how to  model engineering/physics problems through Ordinary Differential Equations (Vibration analysis, control of inverted pendulum, Dynamic model of electric circuits, dynamic model of electric power systems).

Lab

9-10

Integer Programming,  Stochastic Models:

Students will learn how to  model engineering systems through Markov models. Queuing Models. Inventory Models, etc.

Lab 11

Open Ended Lab (OEL) Project:

Students work on OEL.

Lab 12

             

 

INSTRUCTIONS/SUGGESTIONS FOR STUDENTS:

  • Work only on your assigned workstations.
  • Properly log-off and switch off your PC at the end of your work.
  • Bring your lab manuals in each lab.

ES 324L Discrete System Modeling and Simulation

ES 324L: Discrete System Modeling and Simulation (1 CH)

FALL/Spring 202x

Lab Instructor:

 

Email:

 

Lab Engineer:

 

Email:

 

Lab Hours:

 

Students per workstation:

01

Batch:

 

Office:

 

Extension:

 

LAB OBJECTIVES

The goal of this lab is to get familiar with discrete Simulation techniques and their uses in various science and engineering applications. It also aims to provide basic knowledge of designing simulation models, simulation algorithms and their implementation on PCs.

LAB EQUIPMENT / APPARATUS

·        Desktop PC Computers

·        MATLAB and SIMULINK Software

·        Microsoft Excel

MAPPING OF CLOs & PLOs

CLOs

Course Learning Outcomes

PLOs

Bloom’s Taxonomy

CLO-1

Be able to perform Simulation for analyzing engineering systems.

PLO-4

C3 and C4 (Application and Analysis)

CLO-2

Be able to perform Discrete-Event Simulation for optimal decision making.

PLO-4

C3 and C4 (Application and Analysis)

CLO-4

Be able to communicate the simulation result verbally/presentation and document the result through a written report.

PLO-10

A4 (Organization)

LAB EVALUATION

Particular

Total

Lab Assignments/Projects

60%

Open-ended Lab Project

10%

Midterm Exam (Written + Simulation Problem)

30%

Total

100%

LAB CONTENTS

Random Numbers and Monte Carlo Method:

Calculation of π by generating random points inside a unit square.

Lab 1

Monte Carlo Integration:

Calculation of definite integrals by generating random variates uniformly distributed over the interval (a, b).

Lab 2

Generation of Discrete and Continuous Random Variates I:

Inverse Transform Method of generating different random variates. Use of Excel built-in functions.

Lab 3

Generation of Discrete and Continuous Random Variates II:

Accept/Reject Method of generating different random variates. Use of Excel built-in functions.

Lab 4

News-Vendor Problem:

Simulation of News-Vendor problem. Replicating a simulation by one-dimensional Data Table.

Lab 5

Generalized News-Vendor Problem (Advance-Booking):

Simulation of a generalized News-Vendor problem. Replicating a simulation by two-dimensional Data Table.

Lab 6

Simulation of Engineering Systems I:

Using Simulink for simulation of ODEs.

Lab 7

Simulation of Engineering Systems II:

Transfer Functions and their simulation. Comparison with Nested Form and Partition Form of simulation schemes.

Lab 8

Simulation of Engineering Systems III:

Using Simulink for simulation of systems of ODEs.

Lab 9

Simulation of Engineering Systems IV:

Recursive functions and simulation of Difference Equations.

Lab 10

Open Ended Lab (OEL) Project:

Students work on OEL.

Labs 11-12

             

 

INSTRUCTIONS/SUGGESTIONS FOR STUDENTS:

  • Work only on your assigned workstations.
  • Properly log-off and switch off your PC at the end of your work.
  • Bring your lab manuals in each lab.

ES471 Model Engineering

Syllabus/Course Outline

Model Engineering   (ES 471)

Fall/Spring Semester 202x

Pre-Requisite(s):         Calculus I, Calculus II & Differential Equation and Linear Algebra

Instructor:                 

Office Hours:             Posted outside office door of course instructor. Also by appointment.

Course Introduction

The goal of this course is to develop an understanding of the various modeling paradigms appropriate for capturing system behavior and conducting digital computer simulations of many types of systems. The techniques and concepts discussed typically include mathematical modeling of engineering systems based on Linear System of Equations, Nonlinear System of Equations. The course will also cover modeling of Complex Engineering Systems as a set of Differential-Algebraic-Equations (DEAs) models, Graphical Models, Integer Programming, and Stochastic Models.

Course Contents

  1. Mathematical Modeling of Engineering Systems: 

a)      Linear System of Equations (Linear programming, Network flow model, Circuit analysis, etc.).

b)     Nonlinear System of Equations (Multivariable root finding problems, Non-linear programming models, Circuit analysis, Power systems analysis, etc.). 

c)      Discussion about solution/analysis techniques for such models.

  1. Differential-Algebraic models: 

a)      System of Ordinary Differential Equations (Vibration analysis, control of inverted pendulum, Dynamic model of electric circuits, dynamic model of electric power systems).

b)     State-space models. 

c)      Differential-Algebraic Equations (DAEs).

d)     Eigenvalues, and eigenvector analysis of the system of ODEs, discussion about steady-state, stable and unstable equilibrium, and stability.  

  1. Difference Equations, Diffusion, and Poisson Equations from modeling phenomena from continuum mechanics (Fluid mechanics, heat and mass transfer, and modeling of electrodynamics).  
  2. Graphical Models
  3. Integer Programming. 
  4. Stochastic Models:

a)      Markov models.

b)     Queuing Models.

c)      Inventory Models.

Text and Reference Books

Text Books:

 

1.      Mathematical Modeling in Science and Engineering: An Axiomatic Approach by George F. Pinder and I. Herrera

2.      Introduction to Mathematical Modeling  by Mayer Humi.

Reference Books:

1.      Fundamentals of Modeling and Analyzing Engineering Systems Book by Clive L. Dym, James J. Rosenberg, and Philip D. Cha.

Mapping of CLOs to PLOs

Sr. No

Course Learning Outcomes

PLOs

Bloom’s Taxonomy Level

 

After completing the course the student will be able to

 

 

CLO-1

Model Engineering Systems as Linear/Nonlinear System of Equations.

PLO-3

C3 (Applying)

CLO-2

Interpret systems of ordinary differential equations in complex engineering problems

PLO-4

C3 (Applying)

CLO-3

Analyze and evaluate Differential-Algebraic-Equations (DAEs) and Difference Equations  models.

PLO-4

C5 (Evaluating)

CLO-4

Examine Integer Programming, Graphical Models, and Stochastic Models.

PLO-4

C4 (Analysing)

CLO-5

Model a real-world problem and design its solution to improve the living standard of the society

PLO-6

C4 (Analysing)

Direct Assessment Tools for CLOs

CLOs

Assessment Tools

CLO-1

Quizzes, Assignments, Midterm Exam, Final Exam, Projects

CLO-2

Quizzes, Assignments, Midterm Exam, Final Exam, Projects

CLO-3

Quizzes, Assignments, Midterm Exam, Final Exam, Projects

CLO-4

Quizzes, Assignments, Midterm Exam, Final Exam, Projects

Overall Grading Policy

Assessment Items

Percentage

Announced Quizzes

20%

Assignments/Projects

10%

Midterm Exam

30%

Final Exam

40%

Administrative Instructions

·        According to institute policy, 80% attendance is mandatory to appear in the final examination.

·        All quizzes/examinations will be closed book.

·        There will be no retake of scheduled/surprise quizzes.

·        Students may work on home assignments in collaboration with each other, but they must submit their own work; no copying from others. Violation of this will adversely affect their quiz/exam results.

Computer Usage

This is a computer intensive course. Students are expected to have knowledge of basic computer programming techniques. They must be proficient in using the available software such as EXCEL, SIMULINK and MATLAB.

Lecture Breakdown

S/No

Topics

Lectures

1

Introduction to Mathematical Modeling, Basic review of Calculus, and Differential Equations, and Linear Algebra.

3

2

Mathematical Modeling of Engineering Systems: 

a)     Linear System of Equations (Linear programming, Network flow model, Circuit analysis, etc.).

b)     Nonlinear System of Equations (Multivariable root finding problems, Non-linear programming models, Circuit analysis, Power systems analysis, etc.). 

c)     Discussion about solution/analysis techniques for such models..

 

8

3

Graphical Models; Network Flow model, Analysis of graphical network through system of linear and nonlinear equations.

4

4

Differential-Algebraic models: 

a)     System of Ordinary Differential Equations (Vibration analysis, control of inverted pendulum, Dynamic model of electric circuits, dynamic model of electric power systems).

b)     State-space models. 

c)     Differential-Algebraic Equations (DAEs).

d)     Eigenvalues, and eigenvector analysis of the system of ODEs, discussion about steady-state, stable and unstable equilibrium, and stability.  

8

5

Difference Equations, Diffusion, and Poisson Equations from modeling phenomena from continuum mechanics (Fluid mechanics, heat and mass transfer, and modeling of electrodynamics).  

2

6

Integer Programming,  Stochastic Models: Markov models. Queuing Models. Inventory Models.

5

 

Total Lectures

30

Note:   This outline serves only as a rough guidance of the course. It may be changed or modified as and when deemed necessary by the instructor. The Instructor is at liberty to best distribute number of lectures and/or change the sequence of topics to cover the entire course.

Benchmark:

https://catalog.odu.edu/undergraduate/frankbattencollegeofengineeringandtechnology/computationalmodelingandsimulationengineering/#bachelorofscienceinmodelingandsimulationengineeringtext

 

ES325 Advanced Statistics

Syllabus/Course Outline

Advanced Statistics (ES 325)

Fall/Spring Semester 202x

Pre-Requisite(s):          Statistics I

Instructor:                 

Office Hours:             Posted outside office door of course instructor. Also by appointment.

Course Introduction

Statistical methods are used for the analysis of different datasets for forecasting the values, predicting the unknowns, relating the variables for getting deeper insights, and relating data differences with real-world complexities. Data Science extracts knowledge from data on the basis of hidden patterns which can be made explicit by incorporating the statistical algorithms in it. This course is designed to prepare students on statistical techniques with a purview of artificial intelligence and data science.

Course Contents

 

Introduction to Statistics, Use of Statistics in Data Science, Experimental Design, Statistical Techniques for Forecasting, Interpolation/ Extrapolation, Introduction to Probability, Conditional Probability, Prior and Posterior Probability, Random number generation (RNG), Techniques for RNG, Correlation analysis, Chi-Square Dependency tests, Diversity Index, Data Distributions Multivariate Distributions, Error estimation, Confidence Intervals, Linear transformations, Gradient Descent and Coordinate Descent, Likelihood inference, Revision of linear regression and likelihood inference, Fitting algorithms for nonlinear models and related diagnostics, Generalized linear model; exponential families; variance and link functions, Proportion and binary responses; logistic regression, Count data and Poisson responses; log-linear models, Overdispersion and quasi-likelihood; estimating functions, Mixed models, random effects, generalized additive models and penalized regression; Introduction to SPSS, Probability/ Correlation analysis/ Dependency tests/ Regression in SPSS.

 

Text and Reference Books

Text Books:

1.     Probability and Statistics for Computer Scientists, 2nd Edition, Michael Baron.

2.     Probability for Computer Scientists, online Edition, David Forsyth.

 

Reference Books:

 

1.      Discovering Statistics using SPSS for Windows, Andy Field

Mapping of CLOs to PLOs

Sr. No

Course Learning Outcomes

PLOs

Bloom’s Taxonomy Level

 

After completing the course the student will be able to

 

 

CLO-1

Discover different statistical techniques used for forcasting.

PLO-2

C3 (Applying)

CLO-2

Apply regression and other forecasting techniques to forecast probable events

PLO-3

C3 (Applying)

CLO-3

Apply basic data science statistical techniques by using SPSS on real world datasets.

PLO-3

C3 (Applying)

CLO-4

Read research articles or attend workshops/ webinars to appraise the recent research work related to Data Analysis.

PLO-12

A3(Valuing)

Direct Assessment Tools for CLOs

CLOs

Assessment Tools

CLO-1

Quizzes, Assignments, Midterm Exam, Final Exam, Projects

CLO-2

Quizzes, Assignments, Midterm Exam, Final Exam, Projects

CLO-3

Quizzes, Assignments, Midterm Exam, Final Exam, Projects

CLO-4

Quizzes, Assignments, Midterm Exam, Final Exam, Projects

Overall Grading Policy

Assessment Items

Percentage

Announced Quizzes

20%

Assignments/Projects

10%

Midterm Exam

30%

Final Exam

40%

Administrative Instructions

·        According to institute policy, 80% attendance is mandatory to appear in the final examination.

·        All quizzes/examinations will be closed book.

·        There will be no retake of scheduled/surprise quizzes.

·        Students may work on home assignments in collaboration with each other, but they must submit their own work; no copying from others. Violation of this will adversely affect their quiz/exam results.

Computer Usage

This is a computer intensive course. Students are expected to have knowledge of basic computer programming techniques. They must be proficient in using the available software such as EXCEL, SIMULINK and MATLAB.

Lecture Breakdown

S/No

Topics

Lectures

1

Introduction to Statistics, Use of Statistics in Data Science, Experimental Design, Statistical Techniques for Forecasting, Interpolation/ Extrapolation.

3

2

Introduction to Probability, Conditional Probability, Prior and Posterior Probability, Random number generation (RNG), Techniques for RNG, Correlation analysis, Chi-Square Dependency tests, Diversity Index, Data Distributions Multivariate Distributions, Error estimation, Confidence Intervals, Linear transformations.

8

3

Gradient Descent and Coordinate Descent, Likelihood inference, Revision of linear regression and likelihood inference.

 

4

4

Fitting algorithms for nonlinear models and related diagnostics, Generalized linear model; exponential families; variance and link functions, Proportion and binary responses;

8

5

logistic regression, Count data and Poisson responses; log-linear models, Overdispersion and quasi-likelihood; estimating functions, Mixed models, random effects, generalized additive models and penalized regression.

2

6

Introduction to SPSS, Probability/ Correlation analysis/ Dependency tests/ Regression in SPSS.

5

 

Total Lectures

30

Note:   This outline serves only as a rough guidance of the course. It may be changed or modified as and when deemed necessary by the instructor. The Instructor is at liberty to best distribute number of lectures and/or change the sequence of topics to cover the entire course.

 

Benchmark:

https://catalog.odu.edu/undergraduate/frankbattencollegeofengineeringandtechnology/computationalmodelingandsimulationengineering/#bachelorofscienceinmodelingandsimulationengineeringtext

 

ES442 Machine Learning

Syllabus/Course Outline

Machine Learning  (ES 442)

Fall/Spring Semester 202x

Pre-Requisite(s):           Statistics II, Optimization Engineering

Instructor:                 

Office Hours:             Posted outside office door of course instructor. Also by appointment.

Course Introduction

Machine learning is one of the fastest-growing areas of computer science, with far-reaching applications. The aim of this course is to: a) Present the basic machine learning concepts; b) Present a range of machine learning algorithms along with their strengths and weaknesses; c) Apply machine learning algorithms to solve problems of moderate complexity.

Course Contents

 

  1. Introduction to machine learning; concept learning: General-to-specific ordering of hypotheses, Version spaces Algorithm, Candidate elimination algorithm;
  2. Supervised Learning: decision trees, Naive Bayes, Artificial Neural Networks, Support Vector Machines, Overfitting, noisy data, and pruning, Measuring Classifier Accuracy; Linear and Logistic regression;
  3. Unsupervised Learning: Hierarchical Agglomerative Clustering. k-means partitional clustering; Self-Organizing Maps (SOM) k-Nearest-neighbor algorithm; Semisupervised learning with EM using labeled and unlabeled data;
  4. Reinforcement Learning: Hidden Markov models, Monte Carlo inference Exploration vs. Exploitation Trade-off, Markov Decision Processes; Ensemble Learning: Using committees of multiple hypotheses. Bagging, boosting.

 

Text and Reference Books

Text Books:

1.     Machine Learning, Tom, M., McGraw Hill, 1997.

2.     Machine Learning: A Probabilistic Perspective, Kevin P. Murphy, MIT Press,2012

 

Reference Books:

 

Mapping of CLOs to PLOs

Sr. No

Course Learning Outcomes

PLOs

Bloom’s Taxonomy Level

 

After completing the course the student will be able to

 

 

CLO-1

Describe working principle of supervised and unsupervised learning.

PLO-1

C1 (Understand)

CLO-2

Apply supervised and unsupervised machine learning algorithms to formulate a solution for problems.

PLO-3

                   C3 (Applying)

CLO-3

Design solution for real-life machine learning problems related to the challenges to embrace sustainability

PLO-7

C6 (Creating)

CLO-4

Apply reinforcement learning algorithms to complex problems.

PLO-4

                    C3 (Applying)

CLO 5

Attend workshops or read research articles to appraise the recent work in machine learning.

PLO 12

                    A3 (Valuing)

Direct Assessment Tools for CLOs

CLOs

Assessment Tools

CLO-1

Quizzes, Assignments, Midterm Exam, Final Exam, Projects

CLO-2

Quizzes, Assignments, Midterm Exam, Final Exam, Projects

CLO-3

Quizzes, Assignments, Midterm Exam, Final Exam, Projects

CLO-4

Quizzes, Assignments, Midterm Exam, Final Exam, Projects

Overall Grading Policy

Assessment Items

Percentage

Announced Quizzes

20%

Assignments/Projects

10%

Midterm Exam

30%

Final Exam

40%

Administrative Instructions

·        According to institute policy, 80% attendance is mandatory to appear in the final examination.

·        All quizzes/examinations will be closed book.

·        There will be no retake of scheduled/surprise quizzes.

·        Students may work on home assignments in collaboration with each other, but they must submit their own work; no copying from others. Violation of this will adversely affect their quiz/exam results.

Computer Usage

This is a computer intensive course. Students are expected to have knowledge of basic computer programming techniques. They must be proficient in using the available software such as EXCEL, SIMULINK and MATLAB.

Lecture Breakdown

S/No

Topics

Lectures

1

Introduction to machine learning; concept learning: General-to-specific ordering of hypotheses, Version spaces Algorithm, Candidate elimination algorithm;

3

2

Supervised Learning: decision trees, Naive Bayes, Artificial Neural Networks, Support Vector Machines, Overfitting, noisy data, and pruning, Measuring Classifier Accuracy; Linear and Logistic regression;

9

3

Applications of Machine Learning.

2

4

Unsupervised Learning: Hierarchical Agglomerative Clustering. k-means partitional clustering; Self-Organizing Maps (SOM) k-Nearest-neighbor algorithm; Semisupervised learning with EM using labeled and unlabeled data;

9

5

Reinforcement Learning: Hidden Markov models, Monte Carlo inference Exploration vs. Exploitation Trade-off, Markov Decision Processes; Ensemble Learning: Using committees of multiple hypotheses. Bagging, boosting.

6

6

Semester project presentations, and oral exam.

1

 

Total Lectures

30

Note:   This outline serves only as a rough guidance of the course. It may be changed or modified as and when deemed necessary by the instructor. The Instructor is at liberty to best distribute number of lectures and/or change the sequence of topics to cover the entire course.

 

Benchmark:

https://catalog.odu.edu/undergraduate/frankbattencollegeofengineeringandtechnology/computationalmodelingandsimulationengineering/#bachelorofscienceinmodelingandsimulationengineeringtext

 

ES441 Engineering Optimization

Syllabus/Course Outline

Engineering Optimization   (ES 441)

Fall/Spring Semester 202x

Pre-Requisite(s):        Calculus I, Calculus II & Differential Equation and Linear Algebra

Instructor:                 

Office Hours:             Posted outside office door of course instructor. Also by appointment.

Course Introduction

It is an introductory course on optimization theory, which will cover the basics of optimization theory, numerical algorithms, and applications. The course is divided into three main parts: i) linear programming (simplex method, duality theory), ii) unconstrained methods (optimality conditions, descent algorithms, and convergence theorems), and iii) constrained minimization (Lagrange multipliers, Karush-Kuhn-Tucker conditions, active set, penalty, and interior-point methods). Applications in engineering, operations, finance, statistics will be emphasized. Students will also use the MATLAB/Julia optimization toolbox to obtain practical experience with the material.

Course Contents

1.     Introduction to Optimization: Historical context, basis review of Multivariable calculus/Linear Algebra.

2.     Unconstrained Optimization:

·        Problem formulation (single and multivariable problem), Conditions for maxima and minima, Limits, Continuity, Extreme Value Theorem, etc. 

·        Zero Order Methods: Nelder Mead Method, Kaczmarz Algorithm, Coordinate Descent Method, Particle Swarm Algorithm, applications from real-world problems) 

·        First Order Methods: Gradient Descent, Steepest Descent, Golden search, Fibonacci Search, Steepest descent (simplified version: number of iterations and attraction basins of the minima), Gradient method – Armijo inexact line search, Conjugate gradient methods (conjugate directions, linear and nonlinear conjugate gradient).

·        Second-Order Methods: Newton methods (inexact and modified Newton methods), Quasi-Newton methods (Hessian approximations, DFP and BFGS, Broyden class and SR1), Least-squares problems (Gauss-Newton and Levenberg-Marquardt methods).

3.     Constrained optimization: Basics, Handling constraints (Lagrangian and KKT conditions, penalty function), Types of problems, Linear programming (simplex method, interior point methods).

4.     Applications: Electrical Grids, Drone Delivery Systems, Autonomous Vehicle (Predictive Control), Financial Engineering (Manufacturing Costs, etc.).

 

Text and Reference Books

Text Books:

1.     Convex Optimization by S. Boyd & L. Vandenberghe Cambridge Univ. Press, 2004.

2.     Engineering Optimization: Theory and Practice, by Singiresu S. Rao. 

 

Reference Books:

 

Mapping of CLOs to PLOs

Sr. No

Course Learning Outcomes

PLOs

Bloom’s Taxonomy Level

 

After completing the course the student will be able to

 

 

CLO-1

Understand the optimization theory, multivariable calculus and Linear Algebra.

PLO-2

C2 (Understanding)

CLO-2

Apply Zero-order, First-order, and second-order methods for Unconstrained Optimization to real world problems

PLO-3

                 C3 (Applying)

CLO-3

Apply Constrained Optimization, Duality theory, and KKT conditions for optimization of complex problems.

PLO-3

                 C3 (Applying)

CLO-4

Evaluate the existing solutions for real life engineering optimization problems as in individual semester project

PLO-9

                 C5 (Evaluating)

CLO-5

Attend workshops or read research articles to appraise the recent work in Engineering optimization.

PLO-12

                  A3 (Valuing)

Direct Assessment Tools for CLOs

CLOs

Assessment Tools

CLO-1

Quizzes, Assignments, Midterm Exam, Final Exam, Projects

CLO-2

Quizzes, Assignments, Midterm Exam, Final Exam, Projects

CLO-3

Quizzes, Assignments, Midterm Exam, Final Exam, Projects

CLO-4

Quizzes, Assignments, Midterm Exam, Final Exam, Projects

Overall Grading Policy

Assessment Items

Percentage

Announced Quizzes

20%

Assignments/Projects

10%

Midterm Exam

30%

Final Exam

40%

Administrative Instructions

·        According to institute policy, 80% attendance is mandatory to appear in the final examination.

·        All quizzes/examinations will be closed book.

·        There will be no retake of scheduled/surprise quizzes.

·        Students may work on home assignments in collaboration with each other, but they must submit their own work; no copying from others. Violation of this will adversely affect their quiz/exam results.

Computer Usage

This is a computer intensive course. Students are expected to have knowledge of basic computer programming techniques. They must be proficient in using the available software such as Python, Mathematica, EXCEL, SIMULINK and MATLAB.

Lecture Breakdown

S/No

Topics

Lectures

1

Introduction to Optimization: Statement of optimization, Objective function, Problem constraints and constraint surface, Classification of optimization problems.

3

2

Unconstrained Optimization:

·        Problem formulation (single and multivariable problem), Conditions for maxima and minima, Limits, Continuity, Extreme Value Theorem, etc. 

·        Zero Order Methods: Nelder Mead Method, Kaczmarz Algorithm, Coordinate Descent Method, Particle Swarm Algorithm, applications from real-world problems) 

·        First Order Methods: Gradient Descent, Steepest Descent, Golden search, Fibonacci Search, Steepest descent (simplified version: number of iterations and attraction basins of the minima), Gradient method – Armijo inexact line search, Conjugate gradient methods (conjugate directions, linear and nonlinear conjugate gradient).

·        Second-Order Methods: Newton methods (inexact and modified Newton methods), Quasi-Newton methods (Hessian approximations, DFP and BFGS, Broyden class and SR1), Least-squares problems (Gauss-Newton and Levenberg-Marquardt methods).

 

11

3

Constrained optimization: Basics, Handling constraints (Lagrangian and KKT conditions, penalty function), Types of problems, Linear programming (simplex method, interior point methods).

 

10

4

Applications: Electrical Grids, Drone Delivery Systems, Autonomous Vehicle (Predictive Control), Financial Engineering (Manufacturing Costs, etc.).

 

5

5

Summary and Review.

1

 

Total Lectures

30

Note:   This outline serves only as a rough guidance of the course. It may be changed or modified as and when deemed necessary by the instructor. The Instructor is at liberty to best distribute number of lectures and/or change the sequence of topics to cover the entire course.

ES324 Discrete System Modeling and Simulation

Syllabus/Course Outline

Discrete System Modeling and Simulation  (ES 324)

Fall/Spring Semester 202x

Pre-Requisite(s):       ES 202, ES 3xx

Instructor:                 

Office Hours:             Posted outside office door of course instructor. Also by appointment.

Course Introduction

This course is a required course for all students specializing in “MSML” stream offered by the Faculty of Engineering Sciences.  This course covers “Discrete-Event” simulation at an introductory level, preparing students for advanced studies in these fields. The main purpose of the course is to provide an introduction to the modeling and simulation of discrete-state, discrete-event systems (DES). This course will provide an investigation of the steps of a DES simulation study, including problem formulation, conceptual model design, simulation model development, input data modeling, output data analysis, verification and validation, and design of simulation experiments.  Constructing models of a given situation appropriate for computer simulation is a part of the course.  There is an emphasis on providing the mathematical skills with a working knowledge and understanding of basic concepts involved. 

Course Contents

·        Introduction to Simulations: Simulation and modeling; Types of Simulation; Uses of Simulations.

·        General Principles of DES:  Basic concepts; Review of basic probability; Standard probability distributions; Random variates and their uses in discrete event simulation.Discrete-Event System Simulations: Simulation of random numbers and random variates; Simulation of problems of discrete nature; Input modeling, Analysis of output data, Verification and validation of simulation models.

·        Simulation of Queuing Systems and Inventory Systems: Queuing systems and their simulation; M/M/1 and M/M/2 systems; Newsvendor’s problem and simulation of basic inventory systems, Simulation of computer networks.

Text and Reference Books

Text Books:

·        Discrete-Event System Simulation by Jerry Banks et al. 5th Edition 2009, Pearson USA.

·        Discrete-Event Simulation: A First Course by Lawrence M. Leemis et al. 1st Edition 2006, Pearson USA.

 

Reference Books:

 

Mapping of CLOs to PLOs

Sr. No

Course Learning Outcomes

PLOs

Bloom’s Taxonomy Level

 

After completing the course the student will be able to

 

 

CLO-1

Use Simulation Methodology to analyze different engineering systems.

PLO-4

C3 (Analyzing)

CLO-2

Perform Discrete-Event Simulation and evaluate output data for optimal decision making.

PLO-3

C3 (Analyzing)

CLO-3

Investigate real world problems employing computer simulation methods and suggest improvements.

PLO-4

C5 (Evaluate)

CLO-4

Explain the results of an investigation related to a simulation problem/method

PLO-10

A3 (Valuing)

Direct Assessment Tools for CLOs

CLOs

Assessment Tools

CLO-1

Quizzes, Assignments, Midterm Exam, Final Exam, Projects

CLO-2

Quizzes, Assignments, Midterm Exam, Final Exam, Projects

CLO-3

Quizzes, Assignments, Midterm Exam, Final Exam, Projects

CLO-4

Quizzes, Assignments, Midterm Exam, Final Exam, Projects

Overall Grading Policy

Assessment Items

Percentage

Announced Quizzes

20%

Assignments/Projects

10%

Midterm Exam

30%

Final Exam

40%

Administrative Instructions

·        According to institute policy, 80% attendance is mandatory to appear in the final examination.

·        All quizzes/examinations will be closed book.

·        There will be no retake of scheduled/surprise quizzes.

·        Students may work on home assignments in collaboration with each other, but they must submit their own work; no copying from others. Violation of this will adversely affect their quiz/exam results.

Computer Usage

This is a computer intensive course. Students are expected to have knowledge of basic computer programming techniques. They must be proficient in using the available software such as EXCEL, SIMULINK and MATLAB.

Lecture Breakdown

S/No

Topics

Lectures

1

Introduction to Simulations: Simulation and modeling; Types of Simulation; Uses of Simulations.

3

2

General Principles of DES: Basic concepts; Review of basic probability; Standard probability distributions; Random variates and their uses in discrete event simulation.

7

3

Discrete-Event System Simulations: Simulation of random numbers and random variates; Simulation of problems of discrete nature; Input modeling, Analysis of output data, Verification and validation of simulation models.

10

4

Simulation of Queuing Systems and Inventory Systems: Queuing systems and their simulation; M/M/1 and M/M/2 systems; Newsvendor’s problem and simulation of basic inventory systems, Simulation of computer networks.

9

5

Summary and Review.

1

 

Total Lectures

30

Note:   This outline serves only as a rough guidance of the course. It may be changed or modified as and when deemed necessary by the instructor. The Instructor is at liberty to best distribute number of lectures and/or change the sequence of topics to cover the entire course.

ES361 Solid State Electronics

 

ES361 Solid State Electronics

 (3 Credit Hours) – Fall 202X

Pre-Requisite: PH102

Instructors:

 Office: , Email:

Office Hours:

Course Introduction

This course introduces students to the theory and applications of solid-state electronics.  This course introduces students to the theory of solid-state electronics from basic structure to the carrier transport to pn-junction and metal-semiconductor contacts.  The course will also cover solid-state devices and applications such as field-effect transistors (FETs), metal oxide semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs), bipolar transistors and other microelectronics. The students are expected to learn the necessity as well as the basic physics governing solid-state electronics. At the end of the course, students are supposed to be knowledgeable on the theory of solid-state electronics and may implement them in their future academic as well as industrial professions.

Course Contents

•Band-structure and doping of semiconductors.

• Drift-Diffusion Equations; Density of states; Fermi function; Law of Mass Action.

• PN Junctions: Derivation of I-V characteristics; Capacitance; Breakdown; Non-idealities.

• Bipolar Junction Transistor (BJT): Operation principles; Derivation of I-V characteristics; Ebers-Moll model;

Non-idealities.

• MOSFET: Derivation of I-V characteristics; Threshold Voltage; Operating-mode.

• CMOS devices.

• Microfabrication of: BJTs; MOSFETs; CMOS; Integrated circuits.

• Quantum effects: Tunnelling effects in diodes; Tunnel FETs; Quantization of transport; Energy levels in ultra-scaled transistors.

• Optoelectronic & Photonic Devices: Direct Vs Indirect Band-gap devices.

• LEDs; Semiconductor Lasers; Photovoltaic Cells

Mapping of CLOs & PLOs

By the end of the course, the student will be able to:

CLOs

Course Learning Outcomes

PLOs

Blooms Taxonomy

CLO-1

Apply the concepts of atomic structure and quantum theory of solids

PLO_1

Engineering Knowledge

C3 (Application)

CLO-2

Calculate important parameters defining carrier statistics in semiconductor materials under equilibrium and non-equilibrium conditions

PLO_1

Engineering Knowledge

C3 (Application)

CLO-3

Apply the concepts of carrier transport phenomena in semiconductor materials.

PLO_1

Engineering Knowledge

C3 (Application)

CLO-4

Analyze working principles of fundamental semiconductor junction and devices

PLO_2

Problem Analysis

C4 (Analysis)

CLO-5

Comply with originality guidelines while submitting your assignments.

PLO_8

Ethics

A2 (Responding)

CLOs Direct Assessment Mechanism

CLO #

Assessment Tools

CLO1

Quizzes, Assignments, Viva, Midterm Exam, Final Exam

CLO2

Quizzes, Assignments, Viva, Midterm Exam, Final Exam

CLO3

Quizzes, Assignments, Viva, Midterm Exam, Final Exam

CLO4

Report + Viva + Presentation

CLO5

Assignment

 

 

Overall Grading Policy

Assessment Tools

Percentage

Quizzes (Surprise + Scheduled) + Viva

15%

Assignments + Viva

12%

Midterm Examination

20%

Course Project (Complex Engineering Problem)

13%

Final Examination

40%

Text and Reference Books

Besides the handouts given in class, following reference materials shall be used:

Text Book:

•             Donald A. Neamen, “Semiconductor Physics and Devices – Basic Principles” 4th Edition (2012)

Reference Books:

•             S. M. Sze and Kwok K. Ng, “Physics of Semiconductor Devices” 3rd Edition (2007)

•             Ben G. Streetman and Sanjay Kumar Banerjee , “Solid State Electronic Devices” 6th Edition (Indian Edition) (2006)

 

Administrative Instructions + Online Teaching SOPs

§  According to institute policy, 80% attendance is mandatory to appear in the final examination.

§  In any case, there will be no retake of (scheduled/surprise) quizzes.

§  For queries, kindly follow the office hours to avoid any inconvenience.

Online Teaching Related Instructions

·        During mandatory closure of HEIs, course is shifted to MS Teams, where lectures are given in synchronous mode according to announced schedule.

·        Lectures are also recorded for later viewing in case any students have connectivity issues.

·        Quizzes and assignments are administered through the MS Teams assignment system.

·        In order to discourage use of unfair means in quizzes, viva option has been added.

Computer Usage

Students are encouraged to solve some assigned tasks using the available engineering software, such as MATLAB

 

 

 

 

 

Lecture Breakdown

Week

Topics

1-2

Introduction to Solid State Electronics

3-5

 

·        Crystal Structure of Solids, Semiconductor Materials

·        Types of Solids, Space Lattices, The Diamond Structure

·        Atomic Bonding, Imperfections and Impurities in Solids

·        Growth of Semiconductor Materials

6-8

·        Principles of Quantum Mechanics, Wave-Particle Duality, The Uncertainty Principle

·        Schrodinger’s Wave Equation, Applications of Schrodinger Wave Equation

·        Extension of the Wave Theory of Atoms

·        Allowed and Forbidden Energy Bands

 

Mid-Term Exam

9-11

·        The Semiconductor in Equilibrium, Charge Carriers in Semiconductors

·        Dopant Atoms and Energy Levels

·        Extrinsic Semiconductor

·        Statistics of Donors and Acceptors

·        Charge Neutrality

·        Position of Fermi Energy Level

12-14

·        Electrical Conduction in Solids, Carrier Drift, Carrier Diffusion

·        pn Junction, Basic Structure of the pn Junction, Metal-Semiconductor and Semiconductor Heterojunctions, Schottky Barrier Diode,

15

·        Bipolar Transistors, Basic Principle of Operation, MOSFET, Junction Field-Effect Transistor, Basic pn JFET Operations, Device Characteristics, Optical Devices, Solar Cells, Photodetectors

16

Final Examination

 

***All the Best***

 

Benchmark:

https://www.unsw.edu.au/engineering//sites/default/files/documents/ELEC4603-T3- 020%20Course%20Outline%2011sep20.pdf

 

ES426 VLSI Design

 

ES426 VLSI Design (3 Credit Hours) – Semester(Fall/Spring)/Year(202X)

Pre-Requisite: Solid State Electronics

Instructors:

 Office: , Email:

Office Hours:

Course Introduction

To give an introduction and understanding of concepts of the implementation of VLSI designs for digital systems. To develop the understanding of Transistor-Level Logic Design, CMOS Digital Chip Design and evaluation of Gate Functions and Timing Characteristics.

Course Contents

Transistor topology, transistor equations, CMOS process steps, design rules, for custom layout; CMOS logic design, complex gates, BiCMOS circuits, pseudo, NMOS, dynamic logic, dynamic cascaded logic, domino logic, 2 and 4 phase logic, pass transistor logic; control and timing, synchronous and asynchronous, self-timed system, multiphase clocks, examples of ALU, shifters and registers; layout, hand layout, graphical layout, low-level languages, design rule checking, placement of cells, simulation of design, test pattern generation, high-level languages, structured design methodology for FLSI, hierarchical design techniques and examples. ultra-fast VLSI circuits and systems, and their design; digital and analog architectures, serial addition, bitserial multipliers, systolic arrays, future integrated circuit processing, effect of scaling circuit dimensions, physical limits of device fabrication. Clocking and Timing Issues. Layout of digital circuits. HDL Programming in Verilog.

Mapping of CLOs & PLOs

By the end of the course, the student will be able to:

CLOs

Course Learning Outcomes

PLOs

Blooms Taxonomy

CLO-1

Apply the operational principles of transistors.

PLO_1

Engineering Knowledge

C3 (Application)

CLO-2

Calculate important parameters such as  elementary data paths for microprocessors, including moderate-speed adders, subtracters, and multipliers.

PLO_1

Engineering Knowledge

C3 (Application)

CLO-3

Apply logic circuit layouts for CMOS circuits.

PLO_1

Engineering Knowledge

C3 (Application)

CLO-4

Analyze  Gate Functions and Timing Characteristics

PLO_2

Problem Analysis

C4 (Analysis)

CLO-5

Comply with originality guidelines while submitting your assignments.

PLO_8

Ethics

A2 (Responding)

 

 

CLOs Direct Assessment Mechanism

CLO #

Assessment Tools

CLO1

Quizzes, Assignments, Viva, Midterm Exam, Final Exam

CLO2

Quizzes, Assignments, Viva, Midterm Exam, Final Exam

CLO3

Quizzes, Assignments, Viva, Midterm Exam, Final Exam

CLO4

Report + Viva + Presentation

CLO5

Assignment

 

 

Overall Grading Policy

Assessment Tools

Percentage

Quizzes

15%

Assignments + Viva

5%

Midterm Examination

30%

Course Project (Complex Engineering Problem)

10%

Final Examination

40%

Text and Reference Books

Besides the handouts given in class, following reference materials shall be used:

Textbook:

1.      CMOS VLSI Design: A Circuits and Systems Perspective 4th Edition, by Neil Weste, David Harris, Pearson; (March 11, 2010).

Reference Books:

1.      Digital Integrated Circuits 2nd Edition by Jan M. Rabaey, Anantha Chandrakasan, Borivoje Nikolic, Pearson; January 3, 2003.

2.      Zainalabedin Navabi, “Verilog Computer-Based Training Course,” 1st Edition, 2002, McGraw-Hill

 

 

Administrative Instructions + Online Teaching SOPs

§  According to institute policy, 80% attendance is mandatory to appear in the final examination.

§  In any case, there will be no retake of (scheduled/surprise) quizzes.

§  For queries, kindly follow the office hours to avoid any inconvenience.

Online Teaching Related Instructions

·        During mandatory closure of HEIs, course is shifted to MS Teams, where lectures are given in synchronous mode according to announced schedule.

·        Lectures are also recorded for later viewing in case any students have connectivity issues.

·        Quizzes and assignments are administered through the MS Teams assignment system.

·        In order to discourage use of unfair means in quizzes, viva option has been added.

Computer Usage

Students are encouraged to solve some assigned tasks using the available engineering software tools.

 

 

 

 

 

Lecture Breakdown

Week

Topics

1-2

An overview of wafer fabrication, oxidation, Photolithography, Diffusion, Ion implantation

3-5

 

Overview of VLSI Design Methodology VLSI design process- Basic MOS transistors- Enhancement mode transistor operation – Drain current Vs voltage derivation -NMOS inverter- Determination of pull up to pull down ratio for an NMOS inverter-CMOS inverter – DC Characteristics- Bi-CMOS inverter-Latch up in CMOS circuits

6-8

VLSI Design Flow, MOS Layers, Stick diagram, Design rules, Layout generation Circuit concepts and characterization Sheet Resistance, Standard unit of capacitance, Delay, Driving large Capacitive

Loads,

 

Mid-Term Exam

9-11

Propagation delay, Wiring Capacitances, Fan- in and fan-out characteristics, Choice of layers, Introduction to scaling

12-14

Alternative CMOS Logic structures, Design of Adders, Parity generator s, One/Zero Detector, Comparators, Binary Counters , ALU, Multipliers, Shifters, memory elements

15

Standard Cell Array, Gate Arrays, Programmable Array Logic- PLAs, CPLDs, FPGAs

16

Final Examination

 

***All the Best***

 

Benchmark:

https://hec.gov.pk/english/services/universities/RevisedCurricula/Documents/2016-2017/ELECTRONICS.pdf

 

 

ES4XX Imaging and Displays

 

ES4XX Imaging and Displays (3 Credit Hours) – Semester(Fall/Spring)/Year(202X)

Pre-Requisite: Foundations of Photonics

Instructors:

 Office: , Email:

Office Hours:

Course Introduction

This course introduces the basic principles of two- and three-dimensional imaging systems. It begins with the mathematical description of image formation as a linear system and draws on the student’s knowledge of signals and systems to introduce the concepts of point spread function, transfer function, resolution, and restoration. Actual physical imaging systems (such as microscopes, telescopes, and copiers) operating in the gazing and scanning configurations are subsequently modeled and their resolution assessed. Interferometric imaging systems and their applications in metrology are described. Techniques for depth profiling are then introduced including point-by-point scanning (as in laser scanning fluorescence microscopy), echo ranging (as in sonar and radar imaging), and interferometry (as in optical coherence tomography). This is followed by an introduction to computational imaging, including the techniques of computed tomography (CT), range tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Hyperspectral imaging systems and their various configurations are then described including applications in detection (of tumors, for example) and classification (of different targets). Performance measures such as sensitivity and specificity are introduced. Applications for remote sensing, nondestructive testing, and biology and medicine are highlighted.

Course Contents

  1. Description of imaging systems via 2D and 3D signals and systems.
  2. Point spread function, transfer function, resolution, and restoration.
  3. Imaging instruments: microscopes, telescopes, scanners and copiers.
  4. Interferometric imaging. Optical metrology.
  5. Depth imaging: point-by-point scanning (laser scanning fluorescence microscopy), echo ranging (sonar and radar imaging), and interferometry (optical coherence tomography).
  6. Computational imaging: X-ray computed tomography (CT).
  7. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and functional imaging.
  8. Hyperspectral imaging and applications in remote sensing, medicine, and biology.
  9. Performance measures: sensitivity and specificity, ROC characteristics.

Mapping of CLOs & PLOs

By the end of the course, the student will be able to:

CLOs

Course Learning Outcomes

PLOs

Blooms Taxonomy

CLO-1

Apply the various configurations of imaging instruments, including gazing, scanning, interferometric, and tomographic systems to select appropriate imaging modalities for various imaging applications.

PLO_1

Engineering Knowledge

C3 (Application)

CLO-2

Model and simulate imaging system using linear systems principles and write simple codes for tomographic and computational imaging

PLO_3

Design and Development

C5 (Synthesis)

CLO-3

Solve the unmixing problems and estimate concentrations or two materials using data produced by a spectrophotometer.

PLO_1

Engineering Knowledge

C3 (Application)

CLO-4

Analyze/Recognize the fundamental analogies between electrical and optical systems (by virtue of the analogy between one-dimensional and two-dimensional concepts).

PLO_2

Problem Analysis

C4 (Analysis)

CLO-5

Comply with originality guidelines while submitting your assignments.

PLO_8

Ethics

A2 (Responding)

 

CLOs Direct Assessment Mechanism

CLO #

Assessment Tools

CLO1

Quizzes, Assignments, Viva, Midterm Exam, Final Exam

CLO2

Quizzes, Assignments, Viva, Midterm Exam, Final Exam

CLO3

Quizzes, Assignments, Viva, Midterm Exam, Final Exam

CLO4

Report + Viva + Presentation

CLO5

Assignment

 

 

Overall Grading Policy

Assessment Tools

Percentage

Quizzes

15%

Assignments + Viva

5%

Midterm Examination

30%

Course Project (Complex Engineering Problem)

10%

Final Examination

40%

Text and Reference Books

Besides the handouts given in class, following reference materials shall be used:

Textbook:

·        Introduction to Subsurface Imaging, B. Saleh, Cambridge University Press, 2011.

Reference Books:

1.       Flat Panel displays, ST Wu

 

Administrative Instructions + Online Teaching SOPs

§  According to institute policy, 80% attendance is mandatory to appear in the final examination.

§  In any case, there will be no retake of (scheduled/surprise) quizzes.

§  For queries, kindly follow the office hours to avoid any inconvenience.

Online Teaching Related Instructions

·        During mandatory closure of HEIs, course is shifted to MS Teams, where lectures are given in synchronous mode according to announced schedule.

·        Lectures are also recorded for later viewing in case any students have connectivity issues.

·        Quizzes and assignments are administered through the MS Teams assignment system.

·        In order to discourage use of unfair means in quizzes, viva option has been added.

Computer Usage

Students are encouraged to solve some assigned tasks using the available engineering software tools.

 

 

Lecture Breakdown

Week

Topics

1-4

Part A. Image Representation & Processing

1. An image as: a distribution of a physical quantity, a mathematical function, an array, a matrix

2. Introduction to Matlab Image Processing Toolbox

3. Image processing operations: geometric transformations, contrast manipulation

4. Linear blur. Point spread function. Resolution criteria. Matlab implementation

5. Image processing in Adobe Photoshop

6. Concept of spatial frequency. 1D and 2D Fourier transform. Matlab implementation

7. Transfer function, MTF, and spatial bandwidth

5-8

 

Part B. Image Acquisition

1. Physical models of optical imaging systems. PSF, OTF, MTF, resolution

2. Imaging instruments: microscope, camera, and telescope

3. Image scanners, copiers, laser scanning fluorescence microscopy

4. Axial imaging. Echo-based ranging (radar, sonar, and laser metrology)

5. Interferometric axial imaging. Optical metrology. Optical coherence tomography (OCT)

6. Transfer function, MTF, and spatial bandwidth

 

Mid-Term Exam

9-12

Part C. Color Imaging

1. Basic theory of color. The color cube

2. Matlab manipulation of color images

3. Multispectral imaging

13-15

Part D. Display

1. Printing, lithography and display. Contrast and resolution.

2. LCD and LED flat panel display. System characteristics and specifications

3. Color LCD and LED displays. Color rendition

 

Final Examination

 

***All the Best***

Benchmark

https://creol.ucf.edu/ose4830-imaging-and-display/

 

 

 

ES445 Biophotonics

 

ES445 Biophotonics (3 Credit Hours) – Semester(Fall/Spring)/Year(202X)

Pre-Requisite: Foundations of Photonics

Instructors:

 Office: , Email:

Office Hours:

Course Introduction

This course is an introduction to photobiology (interaction of light with biological matter), tissue optics, light-induced cellular processes, optical biosensors, and cellular and molecular imaging. Biophotonics is an emerging multidisciplinary field where light-based methods are utilized to reveal biological mechanisms and diagnose or treat several diseases. This course introduces the basics of biology and photonics and provides the most relevant and important application examples selected from chemistry, biology, pharmacology and medicine. For examples, it includes how to detect and identify new viruses and how to manipulate the brain of mouse with light, etc.

Course Contents

  1. Overview of Biophotonics
  2. Fundamentals of Biology
  3. Basics of light-matter interactions in molecules, cells and tissues
  4. Central dogma #1: DNA
  5. Central dogma #2: RNA
  6. Central dogma #3: Proteins
  7. Bioimaging #1: Non-fluorescence-based microscopy
  8. Bioimaging #2: Fluorescence-based microscopy
  9. BRAIN initiative
  10. Diagnosing diseases with light
  11. Treatment of diseases with light

Mapping of CLOs & PLOs

By the end of the course, the student will be able to:

CLOs

Course Learning Outcomes

PLOs

Blooms Taxonomy

CLO-1

Apply the basics of biophotonics to study the optical properties of Biomaterials.

PLO_1

Engineering Knowledge

C3 (Application)

CLO-2

Calculate important parameters related to DNA sequencing, DNA to RNA transcription, including Drug screening.

PLO_1

Engineering Knowledge

C3 (Application)

CLO-3

Apply fluorescence and non-fluorescence-based microscopy for bioimaging.

PLO_1

Engineering Knowledge

C3 (Application)

CLO-4

Analyze/Diagnose and treatment of diseases using light  

PLO_2

Problem Analysis

C4 (Analysis)

CLO-5

Comply with originality guidelines while submitting your assignments.

PLO_8

Ethics

A2 (Responding)

 

 

CLOs Direct Assessment Mechanism

CLO #

Assessment Tools

CLO1

Quizzes, Assignments, Viva, Midterm Exam, Final Exam

CLO2

Quizzes, Assignments, Viva, Midterm Exam, Final Exam

CLO3

Quizzes, Assignments, Viva, Midterm Exam, Final Exam

CLO4

Report + Viva + Presentation

CLO5

Assignment

 

 

Overall Grading Policy

Assessment Tools

Percentage

Quizzes

15%

Assignments + Viva

5%

Midterm Examination

30%

Course Project (Complex Engineering Problem)

10%

Final Examination

40%

Text and Reference Books

Besides the handouts given in class, following reference materials shall be used:

Textbook:

·        Introduction to Biophotonics”, Paras N. Prasad (2003)

Reference Books:

1.       “Biophotonics: Concepts to Applications”, Gerd Keiser (2016)

2.      “Physical Biology of the Cell”, Rob Phillips (2012)

3.      “Fundamentals of Biomedical Optics”, Caroline Boudoux (2017)

 

Administrative Instructions + Online Teaching SOPs

§  According to institute policy, 80% attendance is mandatory to appear in the final examination.

§  In any case, there will be no retake of (scheduled/surprise) quizzes.

§  For queries, kindly follow the office hours to avoid any inconvenience.

Online Teaching Related Instructions

·        During mandatory closure of HEIs, course is shifted to MS Teams, where lectures are given in synchronous mode according to announced schedule.

·        Lectures are also recorded for later viewing in case any students have connectivity issues.

·        Quizzes and assignments are administered through the MS Teams assignment system.

·        In order to discourage use of unfair means in quizzes, viva option has been added.

Computer Usage

Students are encouraged to solve some assigned tasks using the available engineering software tools.

 

 

 

Lecture Breakdown

Week

Topics

1

Overview of Biophotonics

    • Biology and Biophotonics
    • Medicine/Clinics and Biophotonics

2

 

Fundamentals of Biology

    • The facts of life (Building blocks, central dogma, components of cells…)
    • Biology by the numbers

 

3-4

Basics of light-matter interactions in molecules, cells and tissues

    • Nature of light
    • Refraction, reflection, interference, diffraction
    • Intensity, phase, polarization, scattering, Raman, fluorescence
    • Optical properties of bio-materials

 

5-8

Central dogma #1: DNA

    • How to use light to find out information of our genomes: DNA sequencing
    • DNA replication/repair
    • Illumina and PacBio sequencing
    • Virus detection and identification using PCR

Central dogma #2: RNA

    • Why is each tissue different from others?
    • DNA to RNA transcription
    • Count RNA numbers in cells/tissues: qPCR and RNA-FISH

Central dogma #3: Proteins

    • Enzyme, antibody
    • Every cell has different gene expression level: Flow cytometry
    • Dissect folding dynamics of proteins: Single molecule FRET
    • Drug screening: SPR sensor

 

Mid-Term Exam

9-12

Bioimaging #1: Non-fluorescence-based microscopy

    • Bright-field/Phase contrast/Dark-field/DIC microscopy
    • Raman imaging (SRS microscopy)

Bioimaging #2: Fluorescence-based microscopy

    • Fluorophores (Green fluorescent proteins…)
    • Epi/Confocal/TIRF microscopy
    • Super-resolution fluorescence imaging
    • Tissue engineering with light

 

13

BRAIN initiative

    • Interrogate brain with light: Optogenetics
    • Deep tissue imaging with multi-photon microscopy & light-sheet microscopy

 

14

Diagnosing diseases with light

    • Endoscopy
    • Optical coherence tomography (OCT): Application to ophthalmology
    • Photoacoustic tomography: Application to early cancer detection

 

15

Treatment of diseases with light

    • Killing cancer cells with light: Photodynamic therapy

 

 

Final Examination

 

***All the Best***

 

Benchmark:

https://creol.ucf.edu/ose4721-biophotonics/

 

 

ES444 Geometric Optics

ES444Geometric Optics (3 Credit Hours) – Fall 202X

Pre-Requisite: Linear Algebra and Differential Equations (MT201) and Foundations of photonics (ES2XX)

Instructors:

 Office: , Email:

Office Hours:

Course Introduction

Geometric optics is the study of light in its simplest form by treating light as rays. Light rays travel in straight lines until they encounter an interface (such as a mirror or a lens) where they may be redirected by reflection and refraction. This course describes the physical principles that determine how rays behave at various interfaces. These principles are then used to model simple optical systems with varying degrees of fidelity. Natural optical phenomena (rainbows, mirages, total-internal reflection, etc.) and classic optical systems (prisms, telescopes, cameras, etc.) will be analyzed throughout the course. Linear systems will be introduced to analyze more complex optical systems. This course provides the fundamentals needed for optical system design.

Course Contents

Course Outline will be composed of the following topics:

1.     Introduction to Geometric Optics – Light as Rays: Wave nature of light, propagation in homogeneous media, wavefronts and rays, radiometry, limits of geometrical optics.

2.     Planar Optical Surfaces: Refractive index, optical path length, Fermat’s principle, Snell’s law, reflection and refraction, plane parallel plates, prisms, optical materials.

3.     Curved Optical Surfaces: Image formation, lenses, optical spaces, image types, shape of optical surfaces, ray tracing, paraxial approximation.

4.     Imaging: Lens design, thin lens model, magnification, ZZ’ diagram, cardinal points, Gaussian optics, thick lenses, mirrors.

5.     Apertures: Aperture stop, field stop, F-number, numerical aperture, depth of focus.

6.     Example Optical Systems: Telescopes, cameras, microscopes, luminaires, concentrators, displays.

  1. Aberrations: Diffraction limit, chromatic and monochromatic aberrations.

Mapping of CLOs & PLOs

By the end of the course, the student will be able to:

CLOs

Course Learning Outcomes

PLOs

Blooms Taxonomy

CLO-1

To explain the physical principles underlying geometrical optics, especially the relationship between rays, wavefronts and electromagnetic waves.

PLO1

(Engineering Knowledge)

C2 (Comprehension)

CLO-2

Examine the behavior of a ray (reflection/refraction angles and amplitudes) at any optical surface.  To be able to analyze and design simple optical systems such as telescopes, imagers, luminaires and concentrators.

PLO2

(Problem Analysis)

C4 (Analysis)

CLO-3

Design an imaging system with a desired resolution, field-of-view and magnification.

PLO3

(Design/Development of solutions)

C5 Synthesis)

CLO-4

Model a complex optical system using paraxial ray tracing.

PLO1

(Engineering Knowledge)

C3 (Application)

CLO-5

Identify fundamental limits and aberrations in an optical system.

PLO4

(Investigation)

C4 (Analysis)

CLOs Direct Assessment Mechanism

CLO #

Assessment Tools

CLO1

Quizzes, Assignments,  Midterm Exam

CLO2

Quizzes, Assignments, Midterm Exam, Final Exam

CLO3

Quizzes, Assignments, Midterm Exam

CLO4

Report + Presentation, , Final Exam

CLO5

Assignment, , Final Exam

 

 

Overall Grading Policy

Assessment Tools

Percentage

Quizzes (Surprise + Scheduled)

15%

Assignments

10%

Midterm Examination

20%

Course Project (Complex Engineering Problem)

15%

Final Examination

40%

Text and Reference Books

Besides the handouts given in class, following reference materials shall be used:

Text Book:

•             Geometrical and Trigonometric Optics, 1 ed., E. L. Dereniak, and T. D. Dereniak, Cambridge University Press 2008

Reference Books:

•                   Introduction to Optics, 3rd ed., F. L. Pedrotti, L.S. Pedrotti and L. M. Pedrotti, Prentice-Hall, 2009.

•                   Geometrical Optics and Optical Design, P. Mouralis and J. Macdonald, Oxford University Press, 1997.

 

Administrative Instructions + Online Teaching SOPs

§  According to institute policy, 80% attendance is mandatory to appear in the final examination.

§  In any case, there will be no retake of (scheduled/surprise) quizzes.

§  For queries, kindly follow the office hours to avoid any inconvenience.

Online Teaching Related Instructions

·        During mandatory closure of HEIs, course is shifted to MS Teams, where lectures are given in synchronous mode according to announced schedule.

·        Lectures are also recorded for later viewing in case any students have connectivity issues.

·        Quizzes and assignments are administered through the MS Teams assignment system.

·        In order to discourage use of unfair means in quizzes, viva option has been added.

Computer Usage

Students are encouraged to solve some assigned tasks using the available engineering software, such as MATLAB

 

 

Lecture Breakdown

Week

Topics

1

Intro. Geometrical Optics: Course overview, nature of light, electromagnetic waves

2

Rays and wavefronts, limits of geometrical Optics, radiometry

3

Planar Optics: Refractive index, optical path length, reflection and refraction, Snell’s law, Fermat’s principle, reversibility, total internal reflection, Fresnel coefficients

4

Planar Optics: Brewster angle, plane parallel plates, plane mirrors, image parity

5

Prisms, dispersion,

Optical materials, abbe number, Sellmeier equation

6

Curved Optical Surfaces: Pinhole camera, image formation, refraction at curved surfaces

7

Focusing, curvature, optical power, graphical ray tracing

Objects and images, optical spaces, spherical surfaces, paraxial ray tracing, transfer equations, focal length

8

Imaging 1: Lens shapes, thin lenses, lens-maker’s equation, Gaussian equation

Mapping object-to-image space, magnification, ZZ’ diagram

 

Mid-Term Exam

9

Imaging 1: Sequential imaging,

Combinations of thin-lenses, Gullstrand’s equation, principle points

10

Imaging 2: Thick lenses, cardinal points

Multiple lenses, Gaussian optics

11

Curved mirrors,

ABCD Matrices

12

Apertures: Aperture stop and field stop, F-number, numerical aperture, Chief and marginal rays, field-of-view, resolution, depth of focus

13

Apertures: Imaging systems, optical zoom, vignetting

14

Aberrations: Diffraction, point-spread-function, chromatic aberrations

15

Aberrations: Monochromatic aberrations

 

Final Examination

 

Benchmark:

https://creol.ucf.edu/ose3200-geometric-optics/

ES443 Laser Engineering

ES443 Laser Engineering (3 Credit Hours) – Fall 202X

Pre-Requisite: Foundations of photonics (ES2XX)

Instructors:

 Office: , Email:

Office Hours:

Course Introduction

It is an introductory course on lasers which covers principles of laser amplification and oscillations, design of lasers, and general characteristics of excitation systems. It is suitable for students with backgrounds in physics, electrical engineering, materials and other disciplines who require a fundamental knowledge of lasers and how they operate. The course covers the basic physics of laser operation, and includes understandings of resonator theory, pulsed and continuous wave operation of lasers. Most popular lasers are described, as well as a pulsed techniques such as Q-switching, mode-locking and harmonic generation. The student is also introduced to the exciting types of new lasers being developed.

Course Contents

Course Outline will be composed of the following topics:

 

1.     Introduction, History, Properties of Laser Light

2.     Blackbody Radiation, Planck’s Theorem

3.      Absorption, Spontaneous & Stimulated Emission, Rate Equations

4.     Line Broadening Mechanisms, Non-radiative transitions, degenerate levels,

5.     Saturation

6.     Energy levels: atoms, molecules, solid-state

7.     3 and 4 level systems

8.     Semiconductor Quantum Wells

9.     Matrix Formulation of Geometrical Optics: Reflection and transmission at an interface

10.  Fabry-Perot Interferometer: Diffraction in the Parametric Approximation

11.  Gaussian Beams, modes: ABCD matrices

12.  Properties of Resonators, Stable resonators Unstable resonators

13.  Incoherent Light pumping

14.  Laser pumping: laser diode pumping

15.  Electrical and optical pumping

16.  Rate Equations

17.  Threshold conditions : 3 and 4 level systems

18.  Single mode selection

19.  Laser threshold and cw operation, Quasi-3 level lasers, optimum output coupling, ASE

20.  Paraxial beams, cavity modes, ABCD matrices, Stable and unstable resonators

21.  Relaxation Oscillations

22.  Q-Switching

23.  Mode-locking and Ultra-fast lasers

24.  Crystal lasers

25.  Glass and fiber lasers

26.  Semiconductor lasers: Homo-junction lasers, Double Hetero-junction lasers

27.  Quantum well lasers and VCSELs

28.  HeNe, CO2 and Excimer Lasers

 

 

Mapping of CLOs & PLOs

By the end of the course, the student will be able to:

CLOs

Course Learning Outcomes

PLOs

Blooms Taxonomy

CLO-1

To characterize the difference between laser and thermal radiation, and to recognize the principles of operation of the most common laser types.

PLO1

(Engineering Knowledge)

C2 (Comprehension)

CLO-2

To become conversant with the Einstein treatment of absorption and emission and to be able to model laser media with rate equations, and to solve these.

PLO3

(Design/Development of solutions)

C3 (Application)

CLO-3

To understand gain saturation and broadening and to calculate CW laser output powers.

PLO1

(Engineering Knowledge)

C4 (Analysis)

CLO-4

To analyze stability of laser cavities and calculate Gaussian laser cavity modes, as well as how they propagate in free space and how they are focused.

PLO4

(Investigation)

C4 (Analysis)

CLO-5

To review and calculate pulsed laser outputs.

PLO5

(Modern Tools Usage)

C2 (Comprehension)

CLOs Direct Assessment Mechanism

CLO #

Assessment Tools

CLO1

Quizzes, Assignments,  Midterm Exam

CLO2

Quizzes, Assignments, Midterm Exam, Final Exam

CLO3

Quizzes, Assignments, Midterm Exam

CLO4

Report + Presentation, , Final Exam

CLO5

Assignment, , Final Exam

 

 

Overall Grading Policy

Assessment Tools

Percentage

Quizzes (Surprise + Scheduled)

15%

Assignments

10%

Midterm Examination

20%

Course Project (Complex Engineering Problem)

15%

Final Examination

40%

Text and Reference Books

Besides the handouts given in class, following reference materials shall be used:

Text Book:

•             Orazio Svelto “Principles of Lasers” 5th Ed.,2010, Springer

Reference Books:

•                   Joseph T. Verdeyen “Laser Electronics” 3rd ed., 1995, Prentice Hall

•                   William T. Silfvast “Laser Fundamentals” 2nd Edition, 2008, Cambridge University Press

 

Administrative Instructions + Online Teaching SOPs

§  According to institute policy, 80% attendance is mandatory to appear in the final examination.

§  In any case, there will be no retake of (scheduled/surprise) quizzes.

§  For queries, kindly follow the office hours to avoid any inconvenience.

Online Teaching Related Instructions

·        During mandatory closure of HEIs, course is shifted to MS Teams, where lectures are given in synchronous mode according to announced schedule.

·        Lectures are also recorded for later viewing in case any students have connectivity issues.

·        Quizzes and assignments are administered through the MS Teams assignment system.

·        In order to discourage use of unfair means in quizzes, viva option has been added.

Computer Usage

Students are encouraged to solve some assigned tasks using the available engineering software, such as MATLAB

 

 

Lecture Breakdown

Week

Topics

1

Spontaneous and Stimulated Emission, Absorption

Properties of Laser Beams such as Monochromaticity, Coherence, Directionality, Brightness, Short Time Duration

Blackbody Radiation Theory

Modes of a Rectangular Cavity

2

Spontaneous Emission

Absorption and Stimulated Emission

Line Broadening Mechanisms

Homogeneous and Inhomogeneous Broadening

Mechanisms of Nonradiative Decay, Degenerate or Strongly Coupled Levels, Gain Saturation, Amplified Spontaneous Emission .

3

Energy Levels, Radiative and Nonradiative Transitions in Molecules and Semiconductors

4

Ray and Wave Propagation Through Optical Media

Matrix Formulation of Geometrical Optics

 Wave Reflection and Transmission at a Dielectric Interface

5

The Fabry-Perot Interferometer as a Spectrometer

Diffraction Optics in the Paraxial Approximation

6

Gaussian Beams

Lowest-Order Mode

Space Propagation

Gaussian Beams and the ABCD Law

Higher-Order Modes

7

Q-Switching

·       Passive resonators, eigenmodes, cavity Q

·       Transient behavior, relaxation oscillation

·        Q-switching and mode-locking, short pulse characterization

8

Semiconductor lasers: Homo-junction lasers, Double Hetero-junction lasers

·       Semiconductors: band structure & density of states, Bulk Semiconductors

·       Absorption and gain spectra, low-dimensional semiconductors

Semiconductor diodes, homojunction and heterojunction lasers

 

Mid-Term Exam

9

HeNe, CO2 and Excimer Lasers

·       Gas lasers: amplification in atoms, ions and molecules

·       Frequency conversion: SHG,

·       Sum frequency, parametric amp

10

Passive Optical Resonators

Stable Resonators

Eigenmodes, Eigenvalues, Standing- and Traveling-Waves in a Two-Mirror Resonator

11

Pumping Processes and Systems

Pump Efficiency and Pump Rate

Laser Pumping

Laser Diode Pumps

12

Longitudinal Pumping

Transverse Pumping

Pump Rate and Pump Efficiency

Electrical Pumping

13

Rate Equations, Level Laser and Quasi-Three-Level Laser

Space-Independent  and Space-Dependent Model

14

Transient Laser Behavior

Relaxation Oscillations, Q-Switching, Gain Switching, Mode-Locking

 

15

Solid-State, Dye, and Semiconductor Lasers

·       Solid-State Lasers

·       The Ruby Laser

·       Neodymium Lasers

·       Er:YAG and Yb:Er

·       GlassFiber Lasers

Gas, Chemical, Free Electron, and X-Ray Lasers

·       Gas Lasers

·       Neutral Atom Lasers

·       Helium-Neon Lasers

·       The CO2 Laser

 

Final Examination

Benchmark:

https://creol.ucf.edu/ose6525-laser-engineering/

ES474 Optoelectronics

ES474 Optoelectronics (3 Credit Hours) – Fall 202X

Pre-Requisite: Solid State Electronics

Instructors:

 Office: , Email:

Office Hours:

Course Introduction

This course is an introduction to the principles, design, and applications of optoelectronic devices. The course begins with a description of the interaction of light with semiconductor materials in a p-n junction configuration. This includes the phenomena of absorption, electroluminescence, and stimulated emission. The distinction between direct and indirect compound semiconductors materials is noted. Basic devices are then described: photodiodes, light emitting diodes (LEDs), semiconductor optical amplifiers, and laser diodes are then described. Array detectors, including complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) and charge-coupled devices (CCD) arrays, and array LEDs are then introduced. Basic specifications and applications of each of these devices are described, including solar cells, imaging with array detectors, and LED displays.

Course Contents

•          pn Junction Principles: Open Circuit, Forward Bias and the Shockley Diode Equation, Minority Carrier Charge Stored in Forward Bias, Recombination Current and the Total Current

•          pn Junction Dynamic Resistance and Capacitances: Depletion Layer Capacitance, Recombination Lifetime, Direct Recombination, Indirect Recombination

•          Light-Emitting Diodes: Principles, Homojunction LEDs, Heterostructure, Output Spectrum

•          Quantum Wells, High Intensity LEDs, LED Efficiencies and Luminous Flux, Basic LED Characteristics, LEDs for Optical Fiber Communications, Phosphors and White LEDs

•          Laser Diodes, Laser Diode Equation

•          Vertical Cavity Surface Emitting Lasers

•          Semiconductor Optical Amplifiers 

•          pn Junction Photodiode: Basic Principles, Energy Band Diagrams and Photodetection Modes, Current-Voltage Convention and Modes of Operation, Shockley–Ramo Theorem and External Photocurrent

•          Absorption Coefficient and Photodetector Materials

•          Quantum Efficiency and Responsivity

•          Photodiodes: pin Photodiode, Avalanche photodiode, heterojunction photodiodes, Schottky Junction Photodetector

•          Phototransistors

•          Photoconductive Detectors and Photoconductive Gain

•          Basic Photodiode Circuits

•          Noise in Photodetectors

•          Photovoltaic Devices: Solar Cells

•          Optical Modulators

Mapping of CLOs & PLOs

By the end of the course, the student will be able to:

CLOs

Course Learning Outcomes

PLOs

Blooms Taxonomy

CLO-1

Explain principles and applications of optoelectronic devices, such as, optical modulators, optical sources, optical detectors, optical amplifiers, solar cells, etc.

PLO1

(Engineering Knowledge)

C2 (Comprehension)

CLO-2

Apply understanding of optoelectronic devices and carry out calculations of the respective performance parameters.

PLO1

(Engineering Knowledge)

C3 (Application)

CLO-3

Analyze the difference between various type of optoelectronic components and systems.

PLO1

(Engineering Knowledge)

C3 (Application)

CLO-4

Use modern to tools to design and analyze the optoelectronics devices

PLO5

(Modern Tools Usage)

C4 (Analysis)

CLO-5

Design and analyze Opto-electronics systems to be used in energy and telecommunications such as photo-voltaic devices and wavelength division multiplexing.

PLO5

(Modern Tools Usage)

C4 (Analysis)

CLOs Direct Assessment Mechanism

CLO #

Assessment Tools

CLO1

Quizzes, Assignments, Viva, Midterm Exam, Final Exam

CLO2

Quizzes, Assignments, Viva, Midterm Exam, Final Exam

CLO3

Quizzes, Assignments, Viva, Midterm Exam, Final Exam

CLO4

Report + Viva + Presentation

CLO5

Assignment

 

 

Overall Grading Policy

Assessment Tools

Percentage

Quizzes (Surprise + Scheduled) + Viva

15%

Assignments + Viva

12%

Midterm Examination

20%

Course Project (Complex Engineering Problem)

13%

Final Examination

40%

Text and Reference Books

Besides the handouts given in class, following reference materials shall be used:

Text Book:

•             Optoelectronics and Photonics: Principles and Practices, S. O. Kasap, 2nd Edition, Pearson, NJ, USA, 2013. ISBN: 9781299924482

Reference Books:

•             Fundamentals of Photonics, B. E. A. Saleh and M. C. Teich, 3rd Ed., Wiley, 2019. ISBN: 978-1-119-50687-4

 

Administrative Instructions + Online Teaching SOPs

§  According to institute policy, 80% attendance is mandatory to appear in the final examination.

§  In any case, there will be no retake of (scheduled/surprise) quizzes.

§  For queries, kindly follow the office hours to avoid any inconvenience.

Online Teaching Related Instructions

·        During mandatory closure of HEIs, course is shifted to MS Teams, where lectures are given in synchronous mode according to announced schedule.

·        Lectures are also recorded for later viewing in case any students have connectivity issues.

·        Quizzes and assignments are administered through the MS Teams assignment system.

·        In order to discourage use of unfair means in quizzes, viva option has been added.

Computer Usage

Students are encouraged to solve some assigned tasks using the available engineering software, such as MATLAB

 

 

Lecture Breakdown

Week

Topics

1-2

Introduction to Optoelectronics:

Course overview

Nature of light, electromagnetic waves, Rays and wavefronts

3-5

 

PN Junction Principles:

Heterojunctions Shockley Diode Equation, Band Diagram,

6-8

Light-Emitting Diodes: Principles, Quantum Well High Intensity LEDs, Homojunction LEDs, Heterostructure High Intensity LEDs, Output Spectrum,  Laser Diodes, Phosphors and White LEDs, Vertical Cavity Surface Emitting Lasers

 

Mid-Term Exam

9-11

·        Semiconductor Optical Amplifiers,

·        Optical Modulators

12-13

·        PN Junction Photodiodes

·        Photovoltaic Devices: Solar Cells

·        Absorption Coefficient and Photodetector Materials

·        Quantum Efficiency and Responsivity

14-15

•             Phototransistors

•             Photoconductive Detectors and Photoconductive

·        Active-Matrix Array and CMOS Image Sensors

·        Charge-Coupled Devices

16

Final Examination

 

***All the Best***

 

Benchmark:

https://www2.creol.ucf.edu/Academics/Courses/ViewSyllabus.aspx?CourseScheduleID=1970

ES323 Foundation of Photonics

ES323 Foundation of Photonics (3 Credit Hours) – Fall 202X

Pre-Requisite:

Instructors:

 Office: , Email:

Office Hours:

Course Introduction

Some of the main growth areas in the “high-tech” sectors are centered on the branch of optics known as “Photonics”, examples are; displays, data storage, telecommunication systems. This is not a temporary phenomenon. Continued growth of optics and photonics-based industries means that there will be a growing and permanent need for engineers and scientists with some training in optics. Other areas of optics, such as bio-photonics, laser machining, laser marking, infrared imaging, etc. are growing strongly also. These topics are covered in the other courses in the Photonic Science and Engineering degree program. This course provides students with the strong foundation in optics that will be needed for the subsequent courses

Course Contents

This course introduces the basic descriptions of light as waves (physical optics), and photons. Interference of optical waves is described along with interferometers and their applications to optical metrology and sensing. Fourier series for the analysis of waves. Diffraction of optical waves propagating through apertures is examined and the effects on the resolution of imaging systems and the spreading and focusing of optical beams are covered. Diffraction gratings and grating spectrometers. Introduction to Fourier analysis for treating diffraction. Brief introduction to polarization and polarization devices. Regarding light as photons, a brief introduction to absorption, emission, and luminescence phenomena is followed by a brief description of photonic devices such as light emitting diodes, lasers and optical detectors.

Mapping of CLOs & PLOs

By the end of the course, the student will be able to:

CLOs

Course Learning Outcomes

PLOs

Blooms Taxonomy

CLO-1

Describe the basic principles of physical optics and photonics.

PLO1

(Engineering Knowledge)

C2 (Comprehension)

CLO-2

Apply the principles of superposition, polarization, and diffraction.

PLO1

(Engineering Knowledge)

C3 (Application)

CLO-3

Apply the principles of interferometry.

PLO1

(Engineering Knowledge)

C3 (Application)

CLO-4

Use modern to tools to use and analyze the photonic principles.

PLO5

(Modern Tools Usage)

C4 (Analysis)

CLO-5

Design and analyze the basic optical systems (Lasers/LEDs and Photodetectors)

PLO5

(Modern Tools Usage)

C4 (Analysis)

CLOs Direct Assessment Mechanism

CLO #

Assessment Tools

CLO1

Quizzes, Assignments, Viva, Midterm Exam, Final Exam

CLO2

Quizzes, Assignments, Viva, Midterm Exam, Final Exam

CLO3

Quizzes, Assignments, Viva, Midterm Exam, Final Exam

CLO4

Report + Viva + Presentation

CLO5

Assignment

 

 

Overall Grading Policy

Assessment Tools

Percentage

Quizzes (Surprise + Scheduled) + Viva

15%

Assignments + Viva

12%

Midterm Examination

20%

Course Project (Complex Engineering Problem)

13%

Final Examination

40%

Text and Reference Books

Besides the handouts given in class, following reference materials shall be used:

Text Book:

•             Fundamentals of Photonics, B. E. A. Saleh and M. C. Teich, 3rd Ed., Wiley, 2019. ISBN: 978-1-119-50687-4

Reference Books:

•             Optoelectronics and Photonics: Principles and Practices, S. O. Kasap, 2nd Edition, Pearson, NJ, USA, 2013. ISBN: 9781299924482

 

 

Administrative Instructions + Online Teaching SOPs

§  According to institute policy, 80% attendance is mandatory to appear in the final examination.

§  In any case, there will be no retake of (scheduled/surprise) quizzes.

§  For queries, kindly follow the office hours to avoid any inconvenience.

Online Teaching Related Instructions

·        During mandatory closure of HEIs, course is shifted to MS Teams, where lectures are given in synchronous mode according to announced schedule.

·        Lectures are also recorded for later viewing in case any students have connectivity issues.

·        Quizzes and assignments are administered through the MS Teams assignment system.

·        In order to discourage use of unfair means in quizzes, viva option has been added.

Computer Usage

Students are encouraged to solve some assigned tasks using the available engineering software, such as MATLAB

 

 

Lecture Breakdown

Week

Topics

1-2

Introduction to Photonics:

Course overview

Nature of light, electromagnetic waves, Rays and wavefronts,

3-5

 

Superposition of waves, interference of optical waves, interferometers

6-8

Geometrical optics, Lenses, Mirrors, Apertures, Diffraction of optical waves propagating through apertures

 

Mid-Term Exam

9-11

Introduction to polarization and polarizers, Electro-optic effect, magneto-optic effect

12-14

Absorption, emission, and luminescence phenomena

15

Photonic devices such as light emitting diodes, lasers and optical detectors

Photonic materials.

16

Final Examination

 

***All the Best***

 

Benchmark:

https://www2.creol.ucf.edu/Academics/Courses/ViewSyllabus.aspx?CourseScheduleID=1963

 

ES425 Fiber Optic Communications

 

ES425 Fiber Optic Communications (3 Credit Hours) – Fall 202X

Pre-Requisite: Introduction to Photonics

Instructors:

 Office: , Email:

Office Hours:

Course Introduction

This course is related to the principles of optical fiber communication systems. The course covers three topics: 1) The optical fiber as a transmission channel. 2) Optoelectronic devices used in transmitters, receivers, and multiplexers. 3) Design of the overall communication system and assessment of its performance. In part 1, step-index and graded-index multimode and single-mode optical fibers are described and their attenuation and dispersion characteristics are determined. The transfer function of the fiber system is determined. Part 2 introduces the basic principles of interaction of light with semiconductor materials, including absorption and electroluminescence. Light emitting diodes, laser diodes, and photodiodes are introduced as the basic components of optical transmitters and receivers. Semiconductor and fiber optical amplifiers are also introduced. Part 3 deals with the design of the digital fiber communication system, including derivation of the bit error rates for attenuation- and dispersion-limited systems and determination of the maximum data rates possible for a given length. Introductions to wavelength-division multiplexing (WDM) and optical fiber networks are also provided.

Course Contents

•          Overview of Optical Fiber Communications

•          Optical Fibers: Structures, and Waveguiding

•          Attenuation and Dispersion

•          Optical Sources

•          Power Launching and Coupling

•          Photodetectors

•          Optical Receiver Operation

•          Digital Links

•          WDM Concepts and Components

•          Optical Amplifiers

•          Optical Networks

 

Mapping of CLOs & PLOs

By the end of the course, the student will be able to:

CLOs

Course Learning Outcomes

PLOs

Blooms Taxonomy

CLO-1

Describe how  optical  fibers  guide  light,  including  the concepts  of  guided  modes  and  group velocity.

PLO1

(Engineering Knowledge)

C2 (Comprehension)

CLO-2

Describe how to compute the attenuation and pulse broadening encountered when optical pulses at a given wavelength travel in long fibers.

PLO1

(Engineering Knowledge)

C2 (Comprehension)

CLO-3

Apply the operational principles and the limitations of light sources and detectors used in optical communication.

PLO1

(Engineering Knowledge)

C3 (Application)

CLO-4

Use modern to tools to design and analyze a fiber link

PLO5

(Modern Tools Usage)

C4 (Analysis)

CLO-5

 

 

 

CLOs Direct Assessment Mechanism

CLO #

Assessment Tools

CLO1

Quizzes, Assignments, Viva, Midterm Exam, Final Exam

CLO2

Quizzes, Assignments, Viva, Midterm Exam, Final Exam

CLO3

Quizzes, Assignments, Viva, Midterm Exam, Final Exam

CLO4

Report + Viva + Presentation

CLO5

Assignment

 

 

Overall Grading Policy

Assessment Tools

Percentage

Quizzes (Surprise + Scheduled) + Viva

15%

Assignments + Viva

12%

Midterm Examination

20%

Course Project (Complex Engineering Problem)

13%

Final Examination

40%

Text and Reference Books

Besides the handouts given in class, following reference materials shall be used:

Text Book:

•             Optical Fiber Communications, 4th Edition G. Keiser, McGraw-Hill

Reference Books:

•             Introduction to Optical Fiber Communication Systems, W. Jones, Jr., Oxford University Press.

•             Fiber-Optic Communication Systems, G. Agrawal, Wiley.

•             Fundamentals of Photonics, B. E. A. Saleh and M. C. Teich, 3rd Ed., Wiley, 2019. ISBN: 978-1-119-50687-4

 

Administrative Instructions + Online Teaching SOPs

§  According to institute policy, 80% attendance is mandatory to appear in the final examination.

§  In any case, there will be no retake of (scheduled/surprise) quizzes.

§  For queries, kindly follow the office hours to avoid any inconvenience.

Online Teaching Related Instructions

·        During mandatory closure of HEIs, course is shifted to MS Teams, where lectures are given in synchronous mode according to announced schedule.

·        Lectures are also recorded for later viewing in case any students have connectivity issues.

·        Quizzes and assignments are administered through the MS Teams assignment system.

·        In order to discourage use of unfair means in quizzes, viva option has been added.

Computer Usage

Students are encouraged to solve some assigned tasks using the available engineering software, such as MATLAB

 

 

Lecture Breakdown

Week

Topics

1-2

Course overview

Nature of light, electromagnetic waves, overview of Optical Fiber Communications

3-5

Optical Fibers: Structures, and Waveguiding, Attenuation and Dispersion

6-8

Optical Sources, Light-Emitting Diodes: Laser Diodes, Optical couplers,

 

Mid-Term Exam

9-11

·        Optical Receiver Operation, Photodetectors

12-14

·        WDM Concepts and Components

15

•             Optical Amplifiers

•             Optical Networks

16

Final Examination

 

***All the Best***

 

Benchmark:

https://www.creol.ucf.edu/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2019/10/OSE4470Syllabus.pdf

ES361L Solid State Electronics

ES361L: Solid State Electronics (1 CH)

Lab Instructors

 

Lab Engineers

 

Email

 

Lab Hours

 

Students per workstation

 

Batch

 

Office

 

Extension

 

Semester (Fall/Spring)/Year (202X)

LAB OBJECTIVE

This lab’s aim is to investigate the semiconductor material and device properties like resistivity, conductivity type, mobility, carrier concentration, solar cell characteristics. An open source device characterization tool (nanoHub) is also introduced in this lab.

LAB CONTENTS

Crystal viewing and characterization (CLO1, CLO5)

To study and view different crystal structures and characterization of materials of your own choice.

Lab 1

Carrier statistics (CLO1, CLO5)

To study carrier’s mobility pattern of different crystals and materials.

Lab 2

Transistor Characterization (CLO3, CLO5)

To study the characterization of bipolar junction transistors

Lab 3

PN junction characterization by varying thickness parameters (CLO2, CLO5)

To characterize PN junction varying thickness parameters using Nano Hub.

Lab 4

PN junction characterization by varying Structural and Environmental parameters (CLO2, CLO5)

To characterize PN junction varying structural and environmental parameters using Nano Hub.

Lab 5

Photovoltaic Cell Characterization (CLO2, CLO5)

To characterize PV cell and observe its different characteristics.

Lab 6

Introduction to Modern Tools- Part 1-COMSOL (CLO1, CLO5)

Introduction to the COMSOL and its modeling

Lab 7

Introduction to Modern Tools- Part 2-COMSOL (CLO2, CLO5)

To design and analyze solid state electronic devices

Lab 8

Introduction to Modern Tools- Part 3-SilENSe Tools (CLO1, CLO5)

Introduction to the SilENSe and its modeling

Lab 9

Introduction to Modern Tools- Part 4-SilENSe Tools (CLO2, CLO5)

To design and analyze solid state electronic devices

Lab 10

Open Ended Lab

Problem given by instructor.

Lab 11

         

 

 

 

 

CLOs

Course Learning Outcomes

PLO’s

Taxonomy

CLO-1

To explain the working mechanism of solid state electronic devices

PLO 1

Engineering Knowledge

C-2

CLO-2

To demonstrate the working principles of pn junction devices.

PLO4

Investigation

P-3

CLO-3

To demonstrate the operation of transistors.

PLO4

Investigation

P-3

CLO-4

To demonstrate carrier statistics.

PLO4

Investigation

P-3

CLO-5

To follow SOPs outlined on notice board of semiconductors lab.

PLO8

Ethics

A-3

LAB EQUIPMENT / APPARATUS

Optical devices such as Laser, LED.

Others: Analogue and digital multi meters (ammeter, voltmeters), Rheostats, power supplies, Meter scales.

Simulation and Characterization tools: NanoHub (Opensource), Proteus, Multisim.

 

PARTICULAR

TOTAL (Tentative)

Lab Performance

 40%

Open Ended Lab

15%

Lab Final

45%

Total

100%

INSTRUCTIONS FOR STUDENTS

  • Bring your lab manuals in each lab.
  • 80% min. attendance is required to sit in the final examination.
  • Equipment Failure – If a piece of equipment fails while being used, report it immediately to your lab assistant or tutor. Never try to fix the problem yourself because you could harm yourself and others.
  • Keep your lab space clean and organized.

ES425L Fiber Optic Communication

 

ES425L: Fiber Optic Communication (1 CH)

 

Lab Instructors

Dr. ABC

 

Lab Engineers

Engr. XYZ

Email

ABC@giki.edu.pk

 

Lab Hours

Tuesday (02:30pm to 05:30pm)

Students per workstation

02

 

Batch

28

Office

G45

Extension

2719

 

SPRING 2021

 

LAB OBJECTIVE

 

Laboratory experiments cover the principles and design of optical fiber as a communication channel, coupler, transmitter and receiver using optoelectronic devices, multiplexing, and investigating overall systems performance. The objective is to familiarize student with three main topics: 1) The optical fiber as a transmission channel; 2) Optoelectronic devices used in transmitters, receivers, and multiplexers; 3) Overall communication system performance. The issues of digital and analog optical communication systems and their performances are introduced and quantified.

 

LAB CONTENTS

 

 Introduction to OptiSystem Software and designing a transmitter using External Modulated Laser (CLO1 & CLO3)

This lab includes

·        Understanding the working and commands of the software.

·        Create a transmitter using an external modulated laser. Become familiar with the Component Library, the Main layout, component parameters, and visualizers

Lab 1

 

Receiver and its characteristics using OptiSystem [CLO1, CLO2]

The objective of this lab is to investigate the characteristics of PIN Photodiodes (like responsivity and bandwidth) and understand the usage of the Lightwave Analyzer.

Lab 2

 

Designing Optical Communication System using OptiSystem [CLO1, CLO2, CLO5]

·        To simulate a fiber optic communication system using OptiSystem

·        To measure the wavelength of light-emitting devices using SiLENSe

Lab 3

 

Characterization of optical fiber transmission (CLO2& CLO3)

The experimental work involves building a point to point link, measurement of attenuation (using OTDR) for different connector types, fiber pigtail, and single mode fibers. The objectives also include fiber dispersion measurement in optical fiber links using ED-COM trainer kit

Lab 4

 

Characterization of optical transmitters for modulation (CLO3 & CLO4)

The objective of this experiment is to investigate Pulse broadening in fibers using LED vs. laser sources

Lab 5

 

Performance evaluation of optical communication link (CLO2 & CLO4)

The objective of this experiment is to build a simple optical communication network and study of eye diagrams/ bit error rates. This also include to learn how to generate and evaluate signals in terms of Eye diagram using BER (COM) trainer. This will provide an appreciation of the effects of noise, attenuation and dispersion on system’s performance.

Lab 6

 

Characterization of passive optical components (CLO2 & CLO3)

The objective of this experiment is to characterize Passive devices such as couplers, isolators, interrupters, reflection modules, scanners, fiber circulators and fiber-Bragg gratings

Lab 7

 

Gain and ASE noise analysis of Optical Amplifiers (CLO2 & CLO3)

This experiment involves the characterization of Active devices (in terms of gain and ASE noise): Erbium-doped fiber amplifiers, Semiconductor optical amplifiers.

Lab 8

 

Fiber Fusion Splicing and testing (CLO2 & CLO3)

This experiment involves the preparation of fiber for splicing, use of splicing machine and testing the loss of it using OTDR. The object is to get hands-on experience of splicing and develop the ability to interpret OTDR traces for network analysis (in terms of number of splices, faults, losses using Optosci ED-NET trainer kit for optical network)

Lab 9

 

Advanced applications of optical fiber systems (CLO1& CLO5)

The objective of this experiment is to understand, assemble characterize fiber laser and setup a system for sensing applications of fiber

Lab 10

WDM Networks (CLO3 & CLO4)

The objective of this experiment is to develop a practical understanding and knowledge of the components used in the WDM networks using ED-WDM components kit (optosci WDM trainer). It involves examination of a two channel WDM system, WDM cross-talk, effect of wavelength drift and influence of it on the Eye diagram/BER.

Lab 11

 

Open Ended Lab (CLO1 & CLO5)

Problem given by instructor.

Lab 12

 

CLO’s

Course Learning Outcomes

PLO’s

Bloom Taxonomy

 

CLO-1

To model various fiber optic components and systems using advanced simulation tools and be able to relate experimental work

PLO5 (Modern Tool Usage)

A-3

 

CLO-2

To be able to build optical fiber network by coupling light in and out of fibers, splicing, measuring loss using OTDR and dispersion analysis

PLO3 (Design/Development of Solutions)

P-3

 

CLO-3

To be able to assemble analog and digital fiber based communication links and measure its performance

PLO4 (Investigation)

P-4

 

CLO-4

Establish an integrated view of engineering by investigating the fundamental analogies between electrical and optical communication systems

PLO4 (Engineering Knowledge)

A-4

 

CLO-5

Demonstrate multiple applications of optical fiber in communication systems, sensing, computer networks and biomedical engineering through experimental practice

PLO4 (Investigation)

C-3

 

LAB EQUIPMENT / APPARATUS

 

LEDs, Laser Diodes, Optical modulators, Distributed-feedback lasers, Photodiodes, voltage source, fiber-bragg grating, WDM training kit, RF signal generator, Oscilloscope, Single Mode Fibers, Fiber Fusion Splicer and fiber preparation tools (for stripping and cleaving), Optical couplers, Optical isolators, Optical resonators, Optical multiplexer and de-multiplexer, Optical amplifers, Optisystem, Optosci ED-COM: Fiber optical communications, Optosci ED-WDM Trainer kit, Optosci ED-NET Trainer kit

Others: Optical power meter, power supplies, Optical connectors, optical fiber cleaning tools

 

               

 

PARTICULAR

TOTAL (Tentative)

Lab Performance

 40%

Open Ended Lab

15%

Lab Final

45%

Total

100%

Textbook(s):

  • Optical Fiber Communications, 4th Edition G. Keiser, McGraw-Hill.

Reference Book(s):

  • Introduction to Optical Fiber Communication Systems, W. Jones, Jr., Oxford University Press.
  • Fiber-Optic Communication Systems, G. Agrawal, Wiley.
  • Fundamentals of Photonics, 2nd edition B. Saleh and M. Teich, Wiley, 2007

Lab safety:

  • Do not look or be in the path at any laser beam or even the LED light directly.
  • Optical fibers and its connectors should be handled with extreme care to avoid any damage.
  • Electrostatic discharge protective measures should be ensured at all times.

INSTRUCTIONS FOR STUDENTS

  • Bring your lab manuals in each lab.
  • 80% min. attendance is required to sit in the final examination.
  • Equipment Failure – If a piece of equipment fails while being used, report it immediately to your lab assistant or tutor. Never try to fix the problem yourself because you could harm yourself and others.
  • Keep your lab space clean and organized.

Benchmark: https://creol.ucf.edu/ose4470l-fiber-optic-communications-laboratory/

ES443L Laser Engineering

 

ES443L: Laser Engineering (1 CH)

 

 

Lab Instructors

Dr. ABC

 

 

Lab Engineers

Engr. XYZ

Email

ABC@giki.edu.pk

 

 

Lab Hours

Monday (02:30pm to 05:30pm)

Students per workstation

02

 

 

Batch

28

Office

G45

Extension

2719

 

 

SPRING 2021

 

 

LAB OBJECTIVE

 

 

The objective is to experimentally highlight basic laser phenomena (cover photons; emission; laser cavities and modes; laser threshold; laser beams, focusing and collimation; and second harmonic generation), fundamental issues in designing a laser and its engineering applications. The students will get a hands-on experience in aligning, characterizing, analyzing and applying laser beams.

 

 

LAB CONTENTS

 

 

Gas Laser (CLO1 & CLO2)

The objective of this experiment is to understand gas laser (CO2) principles, basic resonator concepts and resonator modes.

Lab 1

 

 

Characterization of Laser Diodes by measuring the output power as a function of pump power for various cavity configurations (CLO1, CLO2 & CLO5)

The objective is to practice handling precautions and investigate properties of a laser diode as an “optical pump” and familiarize student with the tool Optosci ED-LASE.

Lab 2

 

 

The Solid State Laser (CLO2 & CLO3)

This experiment involves spectroscopy of Nd:YAG crystal, evaluation of Diode Pumped Nd:YAG Laser and study of properties of the gain medium, resonator alignment and mode matching.

Lab 3

 

 

 Nonlinear frequency conversion (CLO1 & CLO3)

The objective of this experiment is to study the property of the nonlinear crystal and the phenomena of intracavity second harmonic generation

Lab 4

 

 

Measurement of effect of intra-cavity loss and output coupling ratio for a fiber laser (CLO2 and CLO3)

The objective is to evaluate the effect of different factors such as intra-cavity loss and output coupling ratio on key performance indicators such as output power, threshold conditions and slope efficiency. This also involves determination of intra-cavity loss and finding the optimum coupling ratio using ED-Lase trainer kit

Lab 5

 

 

Investigation of laser onset time and relaxation oscillations (CLO3 and CLO4)

This experiment involves investigation of the upper state lifetime, laser onset time when pump is switched from zero to above threshold and relaxation oscillations in a fiber laser using ED-Lase

Lab 6

 

 

 Pulsed operation of the laser (CLO2 & CLO4)

This lab involves setting-up experimental setup for direct modulation of the pump laser diode, External cavity modulation and Intracavity modulation (Q-switching)

Lab 7

 

 

 Pulsed second harmonic generation (CLO2 & CLO3)

The objective is to introduce nonlinear optics by focusing pulsed laser beam to a nonlinear crystal to generate second order hormonics.

Lab 8

 

 

 Intensity dependence of the doubled frequency (CLO2 & CLO3)

The objective is to characterize beam characteristics of the residual fundamental and second harmonic beams.

Lab 9

 

EDF ring laser (CLO2 and CLO4)

The objective is to investigate the nonlinear wave mixing and observe the spectrum of an erbium-doped fiber ring laser.

Lab 10

Nonlinear Frequency Generation (CLO2 & CLO3)

The objective is to introduce advanced applications of non-linear effects and role of polarization

Lab 11

Industrial applications of Lasers (CLO4 & CLO5)

The objective is to learn the use laser for marking and engraving for industrial applications and setup a laser range finder system

Lab 12

 

CLO’s

Course Learning Outcomes

PLO’s

Bloom Taxonomy

 

CLO-1

To be able to construct an aligned laser cavity and display a laser running on a single transverse mode.

PLO1 (Engineering Knowledge)

P-3

 

CLO-2

To be able to identify the characteristics of a laser beam, measure laser power and spectral output, and estimate laser irradiance.

PLO2 (Problem Analysis)

C-2

 

CLO-3

To assemble the laser diode-pumping setup, display intra-cavity second harmonic generation phenomena and can sketch the difference between single and multiple spatial mode lasers through experimental work

PLO4

(Investigation)

P-4

 

CLO-4

To study the approach for focusing, collimation and endorse safe use of lasers for the environment in developing solution for an engineering problem

PLO3

(Design/Development of Solutions)

A-3

 

CLO-5

To be able to employ laser tools (such as Optosci ED-LASE) for analysis and operate laser for various industrial applications including cutting, engraving, marking, cleaning and surface treatment.

PLO4

(Investigation)

C-3

 

LAB EQUIPMENT / APPARATUS

 

CO2 Laser source with power supply, slides, Gratings with different number of lines, stage graticule, Optical bench, Convex lens, class IV lasers with an opaque chamber, lasers with different mode of operation, optical chopper, optical beam splitter, mirrors, Optosci ED-LASE trainer kit

 

              

 

PARTICULAR

TOTAL (Tentative)

Lab Performance

 40%

Open Ended Lab

15%

Lab Final

45%

Total

100%

Textbook(s):

  • Laser Engineering, Kelin J. Kuhn, Prentice Hall, 1998. ISBN: 0-020366921-7

Reference Book(s):

  • Principles of lasers. Vol. 4. Svelto, Orazio, and David C. Hanna, New York: Plenum press, 1998.
  • Laser Electronics, 3rd ed., J. T. Verdeyen, Prentice-Hall, 1995

Lab safety:

  • Do not look or be in the path at any laser beam or even the LED light directly.
  • Wear safety goggles. The goggles should be suitable for the power and wavelength of the light that you will use in your experiment.

INSTRUCTIONS FOR STUDENTS

  • Bring your lab manuals in each lab.
  • 80% min. attendance is required to sit in the final examination.
  • Equipment Failure – If a piece of equipment fails while being used, report it immediately to your lab assistant or tutor. Never try to fix the problem yourself because you could harm yourself and others.
  • Keep your lab space clean and organized.

Benchmark                                                                                                                          

https://creol.ucf.edu/ose4520l-laser-engineering-laboratory/

ES323L Foundations of Photonics

 

ES443L: Laser Engineering (1 CH)

 

 

Lab Instructors

Dr. ABC

 

 

Lab Engineers

Engr. XYZ

Email

ABC@giki.edu.pk

 

 

Lab Hours

Monday (02:30pm to 05:30pm)

Students per workstation

02

 

 

Batch

28

Office

G45

Extension

2719

 

 

SPRING 2021

 

 

LAB OBJECTIVE

 

 

The objective is to experimentally highlight basic laser phenomena (cover photons; emission; laser cavities and modes; laser threshold; laser beams, focusing and collimation; and second harmonic generation), fundamental issues in designing a laser and its engineering applications. The students will get a hands-on experience in aligning, characterizing, analyzing and applying laser beams.

 

 

LAB CONTENTS

 

 

Gas Laser (CLO1 & CLO2)

The objective of this experiment is to understand gas laser (CO2) principles, basic resonator concepts and resonator modes.

Lab 1

 

 

Characterization of Laser Diodes by measuring the output power as a function of pump power for various cavity configurations (CLO1, CLO2 & CLO5)

The objective is to practice handling precautions and investigate properties of a laser diode as an “optical pump” and familiarize student with the tool Optosci ED-LASE.

Lab 2

 

 

The Solid State Laser (CLO2 & CLO3)

This experiment involves spectroscopy of Nd:YAG crystal, evaluation of Diode Pumped Nd:YAG Laser and study of properties of the gain medium, resonator alignment and mode matching.

Lab 3

 

 

 Nonlinear frequency conversion (CLO1 & CLO3)

The objective of this experiment is to study the property of the nonlinear crystal and the phenomena of intracavity second harmonic generation

Lab 4

 

 

Measurement of effect of intra-cavity loss and output coupling ratio for a fiber laser (CLO2 and CLO3)

The objective is to evaluate the effect of different factors such as intra-cavity loss and output coupling ratio on key performance indicators such as output power, threshold conditions and slope efficiency. This also involves determination of intra-cavity loss and finding the optimum coupling ratio using ED-Lase trainer kit

Lab 5

 

 

Investigation of laser onset time and relaxation oscillations (CLO3 and CLO4)

This experiment involves investigation of the upper state lifetime, laser onset time when pump is switched from zero to above threshold and relaxation oscillations in a fiber laser using ED-Lase

Lab 6

 

 

 Pulsed operation of the laser (CLO2 & CLO4)

This lab involves setting-up experimental setup for direct modulation of the pump laser diode, External cavity modulation and Intracavity modulation (Q-switching)

Lab 7

 

 

 Pulsed second harmonic generation (CLO2 & CLO3)

The objective is to introduce nonlinear optics by focusing pulsed laser beam to a nonlinear crystal to generate second order hormonics.

Lab 8

 

 

 Intensity dependence of the doubled frequency (CLO2 & CLO3)

The objective is to characterize beam characteristics of the residual fundamental and second harmonic beams.

Lab 9

 

EDF ring laser (CLO2 and CLO4)

The objective is to investigate the nonlinear wave mixing and observe the spectrum of an erbium-doped fiber ring laser.

Lab 10

Nonlinear Frequency Generation (CLO2 & CLO3)

The objective is to introduce advanced applications of non-linear effects and role of polarization

Lab 11

Industrial applications of Lasers (CLO4 & CLO5)

The objective is to learn the use laser for marking and engraving for industrial applications and setup a laser range finder system

Lab 12

 

CLO’s

Course Learning Outcomes

PLO’s

Bloom Taxonomy

 

CLO-1

To be able to construct an aligned laser cavity and display a laser running on a single transverse mode.

PLO1 (Engineering Knowledge)

P-3

 

CLO-2

To be able to identify the characteristics of a laser beam, measure laser power and spectral output, and estimate laser irradiance.

PLO2 (Problem Analysis)

C-2

 

CLO-3

To assemble the laser diode-pumping setup, display intra-cavity second harmonic generation phenomena and can sketch the difference between single and multiple spatial mode lasers through experimental work

PLO4

(Investigation)

P-4

 

CLO-4

To study the approach for focusing, collimation and endorse safe use of lasers for the environment in developing solution for an engineering problem

PLO3

(Design/Development of Solutions)

A-3

 

CLO-5

To be able to employ laser tools (such as Optosci ED-LASE) for analysis and operate laser for various industrial applications including cutting, engraving, marking, cleaning and surface treatment.

PLO4

(Investigation)

C-3

 

LAB EQUIPMENT / APPARATUS

 

CO2 Laser source with power supply, slides, Gratings with different number of lines, stage graticule, Optical bench, Convex lens, class IV lasers with an opaque chamber, lasers with different mode of operation, optical chopper, optical beam splitter, mirrors, Optosci ED-LASE trainer kit

 

              

 

PARTICULAR

TOTAL (Tentative)

Lab Performance

 40%

Open Ended Lab

15%

Lab Final

45%

Total

100%

Textbook(s):

  • Laser Engineering, Kelin J. Kuhn, Prentice Hall, 1998. ISBN: 0-020366921-7

Reference Book(s):

  • Principles of lasers. Vol. 4. Svelto, Orazio, and David C. Hanna, New York: Plenum press, 1998.
  • Laser Electronics, 3rd ed., J. T. Verdeyen, Prentice-Hall, 1995

Lab safety:

  • Do not look or be in the path at any laser beam or even the LED light directly.
  • Wear safety goggles. The goggles should be suitable for the power and wavelength of the light that you will use in your experiment.

INSTRUCTIONS FOR STUDENTS

  • Bring your lab manuals in each lab.
  • 80% min. attendance is required to sit in the final examination.
  • Equipment Failure – If a piece of equipment fails while being used, report it immediately to your lab assistant or tutor. Never try to fix the problem yourself because you could harm yourself and others.
  • Keep your lab space clean and organized.

Benchmark                                                                                                                          

https://creol.ucf.edu/ose4520l-laser-engineering-laboratory/

ES474L Optoelectronics

 

ES474L: Optoelectronics (1 CH)

 

Lab Instructors

Dr. ABC

 

Lab Engineers

Engr. XYZ

Email

ABC@giki.edu.pk

 

Lab Hours

Monday (02:30pm to 05:30pm)

Students per workstation

02

 

Batch

28

Office

G45

Extension

2719

 

SPRING 2021

 

LAB OBJECTIVE

 

This lab is aim to investigate and obtain a basic specification of semiconductor optoelectronic devices including photodiodes, light-emitting diodes, laser diodes, CCDs. Applications include solar cells, displays, photodetection, and optical communications. The advantages and disadvantages of various types of diode-based photodetectors (APD vs. PIN) and light sources (LEDs vs. lasers) are quantitatively studied in the lab.

 

LAB CONTENTS

 

Characterization of LEDs  and Laser Diodes (CLO1, CLO2 & CLO3)

The objective is to practice lab safety rules and study Red, green and blue LEDs and Laser diodes in terms of

·                  Light-current characteristics and power efficiency

·                  Subthreshold and above threshold output/emission spectra

Lab 1

 

Advanced operation of LDs (CLO2 & CLO3)

The objective of this experiment is further explore the operation of LDs and investigate

·        Characteristic temperature

·        Small-, large-signal and pulse-code modulation and differential gain

Lab 2

 

Optoelectronic Receivers (CLO1 & CLO3)

The experiment involves characterization of various type of  Photoconductors and understand the Optoelectronic effect for light detection

Lab 3

 

Optoelectronic numerical displays (I) (CLO2 & CLO3)

The objective of this experiment is to characterize LED numerical displays

Lab 4

 

Optoelectronic numerical displays (II) (CLO2 & CLO3)

The objective of this experiment is to characterize LCD numerical displays

Lab 5

 

Fabrication and characterization of a Photovoltaic Cell (CLO2 & CLO3)

The objective of this experiment is to fabricate and characterize a solar cell and its usage in practical applications such as power generation

Lab 6

 

Free-space Optical transmitter (CLO3 & CLO4)

This experiment involves the investigation of optical modulation and measurement of optical output for free space transmission

Lab 7

 

Characterization of Free-space optical channel and receiver (CLO3 & CLO4)

This experiment involves the experimental measurements related to free-space channel for an optical signal and its detection using a Quadrant photodiode

Lab 8

Open Ended Lab (CLO4 & CLO5)

Problem given by instructor.

Lab 9

 

CLO’s

Course Learning Outcomes

PLO’s

Bloom Taxonomy

 

CLO-1

To experimentally assemble various optoelectronic systems, measure their figure of merits by complying with the safety instructions.

PLO1 (Engineering Knowledge)

P-3

 

CLO-2

To be able to demonstrate light-current characterization of semiconducting light sources (LEDs and LDs) and discover their emission spectra

PLO4

(Investigation)

C-3

 

CLO-3

To be able to analyze advanced specifications (such as modulation bandwidth) of optoelectronic devices and identify them for industrial applications

PLO3 (Design/Development of Solutions)

C-4

 

CLO-4

To be able to organize and learn measurement techniques to characterize optoelectronic devices (LED, laser diodes, LCD and photodiodes) in different modes of operation.

PLO4

(Investigation)

P-3

 

CLO-5

Contribute to an optoelectronic system based multi-disciplinary project consisting of a transmitter and receiver

PLO8

(Ethics)

A-3

 

LAB EQUIPMENT / APPARATUS

 

LEDs, Laser Diodes, Photodiodes, LCDs, current source, voltage source, solar cells, free space optics setup (beam transmitter, mirrors, beam detector, quadrant photodiode), Oscilloscope

Others: Analogue and digital multi meters (ammeter, voltmeters), power supplies

 

               

 

PARTICULAR

TOTAL (Tentative)

Lab Performance

 40%

Open Ended Lab

15%

Lab Final

45%

Total

100%

  • Textbook:

Optoelectronics and Photonics: Principles and Practices, S. O. Kasap, 2nd Edition, Pearson, NJ, USA, 2013. ISBN: 9781299924482

  • References:
    Semiconductor Optoelectronic Devices, P. Bhattacharya, 2nd Ed., Prentice Hall, 1997. Fundamentals of Photonics, B. E. A. Saleh and M. C. Teich, 3rd Ed., Wiley, 2019.

Lab safety:

  • Do not look or be in the path at any laser beam or even the LED light directly.
  • Wear safety goggles. The goggles should be suitable for the power and wavelength of the light that you will use in your experiment.
  • Electrostatic discharge protective measures should be ensured at all times.

INSTRUCTIONS FOR STUDENTS

  • Bring your lab manuals in each lab.
  • 80% min. attendance is required to sit in the final examination.
  • Equipment Failure – If a piece of equipment fails while being used, report it immediately to your lab assistant or tutor. Never try to fix the problem yourself because you could harm yourself and others.
  • Keep your lab space clean and organized.

Benchmark: https://creol.ucf.edu/ose4410l-optoelectronics-laboratory/

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